VIDEO: Te Kura Huanui: Te Kaiaratakinga - Leadership

Published: 08 Jul 2021
Audience:
Māori-medium

Summary

A common condition present in Māori-medium education is leaders as visionaries. Leadership is effective, strategic, aspirational, inspirational and innovative, and they encourage these characteristics among staff. 

Understanding and implementing tikanga Māori and kawa are key aspects of leadership. Leaders must have a knowledge of regional expectations and have a responsibility to uphold those expectations. Leadership is aware of regional and iwi-based tikanga Māori, iwi histories, and ancestral narratives. Leadership have knowledge of, and participate in, key regional/iwi events.

Leaders are champions of:

  • The revitalisation of te reo Māori and tikanga Māori
  • The transformation of whānau, and successful educational outcomes for tauira, grounded in te ao Māori
  • Being role models of affection and empathy for others, supportive of learner aspirations.
     

Leaders have an intimate understanding of, and actively practise whanaungatanga. Kaiako, kaimahi and tumuaki are well known within the local and wider communities and maintain key relationships in the community. Ultimately, leadership acts in service to whānau, iwi and communities.

 

Te Kura Huanui: Te Kairatakinga - Leadership

Summary

A common condition present in Māori-medium education is leaders as visionaries. Leadership is effective, strategic, aspirational, inspirational and innovative, and they encourage these characteristics among staff. 

Understanding and implementing tikanga Māori and kawa are key aspects of leadership. Leaders must have a knowledge of regional expectations and have a responsibility to uphold those expectations. Leadership is aware of regional and iwi-based tikanga Māori, iwi histories, and ancestral narratives. Leadership have knowledge of, and participate in, key regional/iwi events.

Leaders are champions of:

  • The revitalisation of te reo Māori and tikanga Māori
  • The transformation of whānau, and successful educational outcomes for tauira, grounded in te ao Māori
  • Being role models of affection and empathy for others, supportive of learner aspirations.

Leaders have an intimate understanding of, and actively practise whanaungatanga. Kaiako, kaimahi and tumuaki are well known within the local and wider communities and maintain key relationships in the community. Ultimately, leadership acts in service to whānau, iwi and communities.

In this video, filmed with leaders and some of the original  founders of the Māori-medium movement, we find out more about how leadership builds capability across whānau and encourages distributive, sustainable and collective decision making.

 “As a school, as a principal, your teaching faculty is very important. If your community is part of your initiative, whether it’s past students, elders, marae, kōhanga, iwi, business, large community groups – that’s the vehicle that will propel us to achieve excellence.” Hare Rua: Tumuaki, Te Wharekura o Hoani Waititi

Watch: Te Kura Huanui: Te Kairatakinga (In te reo Māori with English captions)

Remote video URL