Terrace End School - 13/04/2015

Findings

Terrace End School makes good use of achievement information to create positive changes to improve learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. The curriculum is very responsive in its promotion and support of many students’ learning. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Terrace End School caters for students in Years 1 to 6. The school’s vision based on ‘TEAM’ (trust, excellence, action and manaakitanga) is evident in all areas of the school and in relationships between students and staff.

There is a strong family atmosphere in the school and good support from the culturally diverse community. Parents and whānau are valued as important partners in their children’s learning.

Regular links with the local early childhood centres help new entrants' transition. Programmes are in place to respond to students’ social, emotional and academic needs.

Students are encouraged to be independent and take on responsibility. Learning in the local community is an important part of the school curriculum.

The board, principal and teachers have an inclusive approach to decisions about learning and resourcing, ensuring students have equitable opportunities to achieve success.

Students access a wide range of opportunities to participate in and enjoy cultural, sporting and arts activities.

The school continues to have a positive reporting history with ERO.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes good use of achievement information to create positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. Teachers use data to plan and respond to students’ strengths and needs and next steps for learning.

Student progress is well tracked and monitored. Assessment data linked to student targets is regularly reported to the board with good analysis and commentary. Teachers effectively use learning journey books with students to discuss their progress and achievement.

Information reported at the end of 2014 shows that many students achieved at or above against National Standards in writing and mathematics. Māori and Pacific students achieve better than their peers in reading, writing and mathematics. Most are at or above in relation to the Standards.

Parents and whānau receive useful information about their children’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards. Reports identify next learning steps and strategies to assist parents to help at home.

School leaders have appropriately identified, for 2015, targets to accelerate achievement in reading and writing. Senior leaders recognise the need to continue to raise student achievement in writing, especially in the senior school.

Classrooms are focused on learning and positive behaviour guidance. There is a settled and purposeful atmosphere. Student engagement is supported by respectful relationships with teachers and other students. There is an emphasis on growing students’ independence as learners and achievers.

Students with additional needs are appropriately catered for in programmes that are responsive to their individual needs. Regular communication with families, whānau and external agencies keeps a focus on their progress.

Significant numbers of English Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) students attend the school. Well planned programmes provide these students with the skills to access The New Zealand Curriculum. Students’ progress is well tracked and reported to the board and parents. Individual student reports show that all make incremental progress overtime. The school uses interpreters to help parents communicate with teachers about their children’s learning.

Senior leaders and staff develop and sustain meaningful partnerships with families and whānau. Opportunities for conversations with parents’ build positive relationships focused on children’s learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Terrace End School curriculum is very responsive in its promotion and support of many students’ learning. Decisions made in designing the school’s ‘connected’ curriculum and areas of emphasis for learning are carefully considered. Experiences that reflect the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand are given importance in the curriculum. School values are woven through learning areas and in real experiences.

Information and communication technologies are meaningfully integrated within school and class programmes to enhance student learning.

Students’ transitions into, across and beyond the school are responsive to students’ and their families and whānau aspirations.

Pacific students’ at Terrace End School are Samoan, Cook Island Māori and Tongan. They experience very good levels of success academically and in sports. Pacific students’ languages, cultures and identities are evident in the classroom curriculum. Their families engage with the school through school activities and learning conversations. This strengthens connections between learning at home and at school.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are valued in protocols and learning programmes. Māori students are encouraged and supported to lead tikanga. The school’s whānau group, Ngā Hau e Wha, are beginning to contribute and inform curriculum decisions. The November 2011 ERO report identified this as an area the board were considering. ERO agrees with trustees’ intention to continue developing this relationship in order to further strengthen understanding and knowledge of tikanga Māori.

Links with Rangitane iwi have been established through Whakapai Hauora and a marae visit.

Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013 - 2017, continues to guide decision making and practices for Māori student success across the school.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The charter and strategic plan identify priorities and actions likely to lead to improved and positive outcomes for students, teachers, families and whānau.

The board make well considered decisions that enable success for students, their families and whānau. They are very well informed through data and detailed reports. Trustees use this information to question and make careful decisions about resourcing.

There is an ongoing cycle of useful and informative review that identifies areas for improvement and change. Review shows strong alignment between the charter aims and targets, and practices in the school.

Appraisal is clearly focused on raising student achievement. Teachers think about, and share with colleagues, practices likely to improve students’ engagement and progress. They present their knowledge about strategies used to the board. Trustees question teachers closely about the impact these have on student achievement.

Staff work well together as a cohesive and supportive team. Student assessment data is used to identify professional learning and development needs for teachers and leaders.

The principal leads in a thoughtful and inclusive way. She has a clear vision for the school strongly focused on team work and maximising students’ learning opportunities.

The board and senior leaders have identified priorities for the future through their own self review. ERO's evaluation supports the direction of these intentions.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Terrace End School makes good use of achievement information to create positive changes to improve learners’ engagement, progress and achievement. The curriculum is very responsive in its promotion and support of many students’ learning. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

13 April 2015

About the School

Location

Palmerston North

Ministry of Education profile number

2466

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

114

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Asian

Pacific

Middle Eastern

Other ethnic groups

42%

19%

23%

9%

5%

2%

Review team on site

February 2015

Date of this report

13 April 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2011

November 2008

September 2005