Te Anau School - 07/08/2019

School Context

Te Anau School is a rural school in Fiordland for students in Years 1 to 6. It has a roll of 265 students. The school’s vision of ‘climbing our way to the top’ is supported by the school’s valued outcomes for students. These are being connected to their world, living the Fiordland values, having a can do attitude, having an inquiring mind and being effective communicators.

The school’s strategic goals include excellence in learning, engaging with their community and connecting with their changing world.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics
  • progress and achievement in relation to school targets for mathematics and in writing
  • achievement in health and science in relation to The New Zealand Curriculum
  • achievement in relation to aspects of their valued outcomes.

Since the 2015 ERO review, the school has experienced significant roll growth. Staff and teachers have been involved in school-wide professional development in mathematics and literacy.

The school is part of the FiNS Col Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is working positively towards achieving equitable outcomes for all students.

School information from 2016 to 2018 shows that most students achieved at or above the school’s expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori students overall achieved at similar levels to NZ European students within the school in reading and mathematics.

In 2018

  • the majority of students achieved at or above the school’s expectations in health

  • most students achieved at or above the school’s expectations in science

  • the majority of students achieved at or above the school’s expectations in ‘connecting with the world’ and ‘having a can do attitude’.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school has had some success in accelerating the progress of students in writing, reading and mathematics over the last three years.

Between 2016 and 2018 the disparity of achievement was closed between boys and girls in reading and writing, and NZ European and Māori students in mathematics.

In 2017, almost half of those students targeted to made accelerated progress in writing, did so.

In 2018, the majority of targeted students made accelerated progress in mathematics.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Students experience a rich and responsive curriculum. The curriculum effectively incorporates the school’s valued outcomes for its learners. They benefit from a range of opportunities to learn within local and cultural contexts and increased opportunities to learn about tikanga and te reo Māori. Students are well engaged in their learning and support each other in meeting their own and other students learning goals. Tailored interventions and meaningful parent engagement are in place to effectively help students who need additional learning support. Students have equitable opportunities to learn.

Leaders are effectively building teachers’ professional capability and their collective capacity as a team. Teachers are well supported to continuously improve their teaching practice through relevant professional development, useful appraisal, and allocated time for reflective practice and professional dialogue. A range of effective teaching strategies are used by teachers to promote positive student learning. Teachers plan collaboratively to ensure cohesive learning across the school. Good systems ensure that leaning about quality teaching practice is sustained.

Trustees and school leaders are highly committed to enabling equitable and excellent outcomes for all students and accelerating learning for those students who need it. The school’s evaluation framework supports a focus on ongoing improvement and includes seeking the aspirations of parents/whānau and students. Trustees and leaders have high expectations for teachers and staff. Strategic resourcing from the board and the wider community ensure adequate resourcing for initiatives designed to raise student achievement. Leaders ensure sufficient systems are in place to maintain the focus on priority learners and to build a shared responsibility for their learning.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Some further developments are needed in school processes and practices for ensuring continued positive learning outcomes for all students.

The board should be better informed about the rates of progress and achievement of all students. School leaders need to draw on existing data to understand the sufficiency of progress and achievement of all students, including significant groups within the school, in relation to the school’s expectations for achievement across all curriculum areas and other valued outcomes the school has for its students.

Reporting schoolwide data on progress and achievement will support the board to allocate resources effectively to ensure equitable and excellent outcomes for students.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Te Anau School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Well placed.

ERO’s Framework: Overall School Performance is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • providing equitable learning opportunities within a responsive, rich curriculum that engages learners
  • effectively building teachers’ professional capability and their collective capacity for well-coordinated and consistent teaching practices that support positive student learning outcomes
  • stewardship and leadership which is highly committed to enabling equitable and excellent outcomes for all students and accelerating learning for those students who need it.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • improving systems to monitor and report on the sufficiency of progress and achievement of all students that will inform the school’s internal evaluation
  • reporting on students’ progress and achievement in relation to the school’s other valued outcomes.

Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services Southern
7 August 2019

About the school

Location

Te Anau

Ministry of Education profile number

4206

School type

Contributing Primary (Year 1- 6)

School roll

265

Gender composition

Boys 56%, Girls 44%

Ethnic composition

Māori 21%

NZ European/Pākeha 65%

Asian 6%

Other ethnicities 8%

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

No

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

May 2019

Date of this report

7 August 2019

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review November 2015

Education Review July 2012

Education Review October 2008