BestStart Montessori Mosgiel

Education institution number:
80081
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
90
Telephone:
Address:

65 Murray Street, Mosgiel

View on map

1 Evaluation of BestStart Montessori Mosgiel

How well placed is BestStart Montessori Mosgiel to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

BestStart Mosgiel Montessori is a purpose-built centre providing full-day education and care for up to 70 children, including 15 under two year olds. Children play and learn in three Montessori classrooms, according to their age and readiness for the next area. Older children share a large outdoor play area. There is a separate outdoor area for younger children. Children come from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Since this centre's last ERO review in 2015, a new manager was appointed to oversee the daily programme and operations. She is supported by a teaching team of two head teachers, classroom teachers and caregivers. Most are qualified early childhood teachers.

This service is owned by the BestStart organisation. It maintains oversight of the centre operation and supports leadership, staff development and business management.

The service leaders, staff, and whānau and children (tamariki) have formed a vision and philosophy that are consistent with the Montessori values and principles for equipping tamariki with the needed skills and dispositions for life within and beyond the centre.

The Review Findings

This service effectively supports tamariki and their whānau to feel valued, welcome and involved. Dedicated teachers ensure infants and toddlers are well cared for and settle easily. Parents and whānau are very well informed about the centre programme and the learning of their tamariki. Their opinions are regularly sought to inform planning for individual tamariki and centre improvement. Centre leaders are working on ways to build parents’ understanding of the Montessori curriculum.

Tamariki who require extra care are closely monitored and very well supported. Leaders and teachers work collaboratively to ensure that the diverse needs of tamariki and their whānau are met. Tamariki are very well supported by teachers as they transition into, through and out of the centre. Infants and toddlers experience calm, nurturing environments for learning.

Tamariki are active participants in and contributors to their learning. They are supported to achieve the centre aims to develop independence and responsibility for themselves, each other and their environment. With teacher support tamariki have created a food pantry and book library for community use. They learn through activities that are relevant to the life around them. Resources are thoughtfully presented so that tamariki have choice in the level of learning they feel ready for.

Tamariki have many opportunities for wider learning, such as social and physical development, and experiencing and applying learning in the community context. The outside areas provide good opportunity for physical play. Trips outside the centre and whānau focused events at the centre, provide meaningful opportunities for tamariki to interact with their community. Leaders are working on more closely aligning the indoor and outdoor programmes.

The teaching team is well supported by service leaders to develop teaching practices that achieve the centre's aims and aspirations for tamariki. Planning and assessment have been strengthened so that the progress of individual tamariki is regularly monitored and effectively planned for.

The teaching team and centre leaders are intentionally strengthening the way that Māori, Pacific and other cultures within the community are valued, learnt about and celebrated. This is evident, for example, in children’s enjoyment, ease and skill in using te reo and tikanga Māori in their daily learning. These are being increasingly incorporated into the daily programme and teaching practices. Children prepare kai and share karakia and waiata, particularly at times of cultural celebrations for all whānau, such as Matariki, Polyfest and the Chinese New Year.

The centre manager, with support from BestStart managers, has established a solid platform for centre development and improvement. Leaders and the teaching team have a shared commitment to the Montessori philosophy and centre vision for tamariki. The outcomes valued for tamariki guide strategic planning and decision making. Internal evaluation practices have been strengthened and are regularly undertaken and acted on for improvement. Teacher development is targeted to ensure best practice models are followed. Teacher collaboration and peer and manager support are significant contributors to improvement.

Key Next Steps

The centre has identified, and ERO agrees, that its next steps are to further improve:

  • how individual children's plans show progress in learning

  • the way teachers and the centre curriculum incorporates te ao Māori

  • aspects of internal evaluation, including better evaluation of the impact of teaching strategies.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of BestStart Montessori Mosgiel completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of BestStart Montessori Mosgiel will be in four years.

Alan Wynyard

Director Review & Improvement Services Southern

Te Waipounamu - Southern Region

12 November 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Mosgiel

Ministry of Education profile number

80081

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

70 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

89

Gender composition

Boys: 46

Girls: 43

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
Other ethnicities

11
71
1
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2018

Date of this report

12 November 2018

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

November 2014

Education Review

June 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Montessori @ Mosgiel

How well placed is Montessori @ Mosgiel to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Montessori @ Mosgiel is a purpose-built centre providing care and education for children aged from three months to six years. Children are able to attend all day or for morning and/or afternoon sessions. Since the last review in 2011 the centre has had significant roll growth. The centre has managed this period of rapid growth very well.

The programme is based on the Montessori approach. The centre is a member of Montessori Aotearoa New Zealand (MANZ). It is the only Montessori preschool in the Taieri area. Teachers are trained, or in training, in the Montessori way.

The centre philosophy includes a strong focus on:

  • working in partnership with whānau to support the goals and aspirations for their child’s learning
  • valuing children’s learning and ensuring they have the time and space to learn
  • children viewing themselves as capable and confident learners.

Bicultural practices are evident in the centre. Te reo and tikanga Māori are woven into the daily programmes and routines.

Since the June 2011 ERO review the centre has successfully addressed the need to improve strategic planning and extend self-review practices. Developing effective planning and assessment of children’s learning continues to be work in progress.

The Review Findings

Relationships. Interactions between teachers and children are warm and caring. Teachers work well with each other and share planning and ideas to support children’s learning. Older children interact well together and support each other in their learning. Younger children play comfortably alongside each other.

Child-centred learning programmes. Children learn in settled classrooms. They know the routines well. These do not dominate but allow for the children to sustain their play for long periods of time. Teachers are very skilful at encouraging children to solve problems and work things out for themselves. They know when it is right to step back and when support is needed. There is a strong focus on building children’s independence and life skills. For example, children are expected to prepare food, take responsibility for their belongings and put equipment back in the appropriate place. Children enjoy a variety of experiences beyond the centre.

Children have access to high-quality resources to support their understanding of mathematical concepts and early literacy.

Valuing parents. Parents are well informed and involved in their children’s learning. Teachers have intentionally created an environment where parents feel welcome. Learning stories provide evidence of parents’ aspirations being gathered and responded to. The parent community was consulted in the development of the philosophy.

Self review. Review is based on a useful framework that is leading to robust evaluation and useful findings. Parents’ opinions are gathered to contribute to the self-review process. The results are then shared with the community, along with what they intend to do to improve what will happen for children.

Sustainability. The professional-service manager and business manager provide strong support to the centre manager for curriculum development and administration. Kidicorp supports teachers to develop their leadership skills through well-planned and targeted professional learning and development. Currently one head teacher is involved in a Future Leaders course to equip teachers to step up into leadership roles.

Key Next Steps

Planning and assessment. The quality of planning and assessment is inconsistent. In some learning stories and planning documentation the recorded teaching strategies are too general. These need to be more explicit and detailed to show what teachers will do to support children’s learning. The teachers could enhance planning and assessment by more consistently evaluating the impact of their teaching on children’s learning. There are some useful examples in profiles books that teachers could use as models to follow.

Programme in the Little Ferns Room. The programme in the Little Ferns room needs to be reviewed to ensure that children of all ages are engaged and motivated in their learning.

Outdoor environment. Leaders and teachers have identified that the outside area for Little Ferns is in need of review and development. ERO agrees with this.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Montessori @ Mosgiel completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

While on site ERO found that the supervision of children in Little Ferns was not always reflective of best practice. This needs to be carefully managed, especially when children have access to both indoor and outdoor areas.

The plans to manage risks when children and teachers go on trips into the community are completed. These plans need to be more detailed to ensure strategies for keeping children safe are known by all.

The Policy for Prevention of Child Abuse is ambiguous around direct reporting. This needs to be clarified.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Montessori @ Mosgiel will be in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

28 November 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Mosgiel

Ministry of Education profile number

80081

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

70 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

95

Gender composition

Girls: 50

Boys: 45

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Others

11

76

8

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

September 2014

Date of this report

28 November 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.