Cherry's Early Learning Centre

Education institution number:
70342
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
61
Telephone:
Address:

45 Riverview Street, Beckenham, Christchurch

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Cherry's Early Learning Centre - 09/09/2019

1 Evaluation of Cherry’s Early Learning Centre

How well placed is Cherry’s Early Learning Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Cherry's Early Learning Centre is very well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cherry's Early Learning Centre is one of two early learning services owned and operated by a family business in Christchurch. The centre caters for the learning and education of children aged one to six- years-old within a home-like environment.

The centre philosophy gives emphasis to Enviroschools principles, and to values that include a commitment to sustainability, promoting children's understanding of nature and respect of the earth, valuing children as unique individuals, encouraging curiosity, fostering partnerships with families, respecting parents as first educators, and integrating te ao Māori.

The core vision and values endeavour to teach children 'a sense of guardianship of their environment to protect our limited resource'. In regard to this, the children's aspirations are that 'together we are caring for and protecting our Earth and each other'.

The centre has been awarded, and has sustained, the Enviroschools' green/gold award for its strong reflection, in practice, of the principles of Enviroschool over a number of years.

All leaders and teachers are qualified, registered teachers. Leaders and teachers have been very responsive to the areas identified for further improvement in the 2015 ERO report. Together they have further strengthened learning partnerships with parents, and appraisal processes.

The Review Findings

Leaders and teachers demonstrate a strong commitment to the centre's philosophy, vision, values and the principles of Enviroschools. These values and principles are highly evident in practice. Children benefit from the provision of a rich bicultural curriculum within a unique, natural learning environment.

Leaders and teachers actively foster respectful, reciprocal relationships within the centre and the local community. They model care and respect for one another, for children, families and the environment. Parents are highly valued as first teachers of their children and partners in their child's learning journey.

The home cultures, language and identity of children and families are highly respected. Bicultural practices are well integrated in ways that are meaningful to children and respectful of Māori culture. Transitions into the centre, between the infants and toddlers and the older children's areas are personalised and well-paced to meet the needs of individual children and their families.

Teachers promote an inclusive and culturally responsive environment. They take collective responsibility for children's learning and wellbeing. Children are actively involved in a wide range of interesting learning experiences that inspire their curiosity and exploration, particularly in science. Teachers are very responsive to the individual interests, strengths and capabilities of each child. Children with additional learning needs are well supported to succeed in their learning.

Key teachers and consistent practices in the nursery area promote a positive sense of wellbeing and belonging for infants and toddlers. Teachers are sensitive to each child's needs and preferences. They provide calm, unhurried routines and caring interactions.

Parents are well informed about their child's learning and wellbeing through daily conversations and well written learning records that capture significant happenings and progress in the child's learning.

Leaders have developed a systematic approach to the effective operation of the service. They have high expectations for teaching practices and for children's learning. Robust appraisal processes and targeted professional development help to build on teacher capability and leadership capacity. Well-developed reflective practices and internal evaluation are strongly focused on ongoing improvement and positive learning outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

Leaders and the ERO team agree that the next steps are to:

  • refine strategic planning to clearly identify key annual priorities, and regularly monitor, evaluate and report on progress in relation to strategic goals
  • include parents and whānau in consultation about the centre's philosophy.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cherry’s Early Learning Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Director Review and Improvement Services Te Tai Tini

Southern Region

9 September 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

70342

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 14 aged under 2

Service roll

75

Gender composition

Girls 38, boys 37

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnicities

67
8

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2019

Date of this report

9 September 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2015

Education Review

May 2012

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Cherry's Early Learning Centre - 09/09/2015

1 Evaluation of Cherry's Early Learning Centre

How well placed is Cherry's Early Learning Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cherry’s Early Learning Centre provides for children from babies to school age. The centre has separate indoor and outdoor areas for infants and toddlers and for older children. The teachers are qualified. The majority of staff have worked at the centre for a number of years.

The centre has been awarded the enviro school green/gold award for its commitment to the principles of enviro school. These are evident in the centre’s natural, well presented and bicultural environment, and its sustainable practices.

Since the 2012 ERO review, the managers and staff have extensively and thoughtfully redesigned the interior of the centre to provide modern, inviting and well used play and work spaces for children and staff.

The recommendation in the 2012 ERO report, to further refine planning and evaluation to improve learning outcomes for all children, has been met to a very high standard.

The Review Findings

The centre has a well developed and shared philosophy that focuses on the ‘enviro school’ philosophy. This is very evident in learning and teaching practices and in the centre environment. The staff regularly review centre practices to make sure they help meet the centre's strategic vision and goals.

Teachers successfully use children’s interests within the programme to extend their learning. Children are prompted to inquire, wonder, ask questions and problem solve. The centre’s curriculum is broad and includes mathematics, literacy, music and science very well within the enviro school philosophy. Teachers foster strong positive social relationships with children and between children. These approaches result in high levels of engagement and enjoyment in learning for all children.

Children under two years old are very well supported to settle into the centre and to build their confidence to learn and relate to other children. The programme is very individualised to meet the needs of each child. The internal and external learning environment stimulates children’s curiosity to explore, test themselves and develop new skills and confidence. Teachers have developed a strong home-centre partnership. Information is sought from parents and whānau. This is valued and well used.

New Zealand’s bicultural heritage is effectively integrated into all aspects of the centre’s programme. Parents of Māori children are well supported to share their culture and to understand how they could support their children's learning.

Transitions of children into the centre, within the centre and on to school are well planned, organised and effective. Parents are encouraged to spend time with their children to make sure they are settled and secure.

Planning and child assessment practices are of high quality and they strongly reflect the interests of children. Planning processes are consistent with the principles of Te Whāriki, the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum. Teachers' work with children is well guided by clearly identified learning outcomes and useful plans for group learning. There are good levels of consistency across teaching staff. Ongoing planning is well based on the review of current planning outcomes.

Learning stories are effective in guiding and evaluating children’s learning. Goals are set for individual children. A range of appropriate learning opportunities and teaching approaches that are likely to help children to achieve them are provided. Learning steps and expected progress are also identified. Teachers are increasing opportunities for parents to share aspirations for their children’s learning and wellbeing, and to contribute to successful learning outcomes.

Leaders are focussed on improving the quality of education and care. Their roles and responsibilities are well supported by job descriptions. Leaders work collaboratively with staff, value and respect their input and set high expectations for learning and teaching. Teachers are supported to grow their leadership abilities and receive professional development to ensure high quality teaching.

The service provider has developed realistic annual planning processes. Outcomes for children’s learning and wellbeing are clearly stated and regularly evaluated. A comprehensive policy framework supports children’s wellbeing and safety. Policies are regularly reviewed.

Centre self review is well developed, highly effective and closely linked to strategic goals. There are well established review processes that are understood and effectively implemented by staff. Centre wide review is further supported by the reflective practices of individual staff. Changes made as a result of review are carefully monitored and evaluated.

Key Next Steps

Teachers have trialled different ways to establish partnerships that better support children’s learning. The next step is to fully implement this initiative so that all children can benefit from learning partnerships between parents, teachers and themselves.

Recent changes to teachers’ appraisal processes are supporting improvements that benefit children’s learning and wellbeing. Appraisal could be further strengthened through:

  • extending goal setting by teachers to include goals that are better linked to strategic goals
  • using observations of teachers to provide them with feedback that strengthens their individual reflection and evaluation practices
  • seeking outside appraisal opportunities for the centre manager.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cherry's Early Learning Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Cherry's Early Learning Centre will be in four years.

Chris Rowe

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Acting)

9 September 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

70342

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 14 aged under two

Service roll

85

Gender composition

Boys 49; Girls 36

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other ethnicities

2
77
6

Percentage of qualified teachers 0-49% 50-79% 80% Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2015

Date of this report

9 September 2015

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

May 2012

 

Education Review

October 2008

 

Education Review

September 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.