Lyttelton Street Playcentre

Education institution number:
70084
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
22
Telephone:
Address:

81 Lyttelton Street, Spreydon, Christchurch

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1. Evaluation of Lyttelton Street Playcentre

How well placed is Lyttelton Street Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Lyttelton Street Playcentre is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

This playcentre operates under the guidance of the Canterbury Playcentre Association. The playcentre is a parent cooperative. The parents are encouraged to be involved in all aspects of the programme and centre operation.

Lyttelton Street Playcentre has five morning sessions and one afternoon session. ‘Babies Can Play’ is a special programme for infants and parents that operates from this centre.

Since the October 2011 ERO review, the centre has developed better procedures for self review and introduced practical initiatives to improve children’s assessments and planning.

This review was part of a cluster of 11 playcentre reviews in the Canterbury Playcentre Association.

The Review Findings

Children and parents experience a welcoming, settled and vibrant learning environment. They make good use of the well-resourced indoor and outdoor areas to play and learn together.

Parents are active partners in children’s play. They let children decide what should happen next, ask good questions to help children develop their ideas and use the resources in creative ways. Children are happy, motivated and confident.

Parents readily identify mathematics in children’s play and help children to better understand mathematical concepts. They have recently completed a review of mathematics in the programme. They developed a useful list of words that parents might use to extend children’s knowledge and enjoyment of mathematics.

The parents are making good progress in increasing the inclusion of te reo and tikanga Māori in the programme. Centre self review and training provided by the Canterbury Playcentre Association is well used to support parents with this important aspect of the curriculum.

The centre operates effectively as a parent cooperative. There are well-established systems and practices for the daily operation of the playcentre. The centre support person provides significant assistance. Parents make effective use of the playcentre parent training programmes to increase their knowledge of children’s learning and the operation of the playcentre.

Key Next Steps

The centre parents and ERO agree that the next steps for the centre include:

  • continuing to increase the inclusion of te reo, tikanga Māori and the home cultures of all children, particularly in the programme and learning stories
  • building on recent initiatives for child assessment and planning by identifying children’s learning more clearly, and including ways that parents help children learn.

Canterbury Playcentre Association

This is the third cluster review of a number of playcentres that ERO has undertaken in collaboration with the association. Each of the previous cluster reviews has identified emerging strengths from all playcentres reviewed. This process has resulted in key next steps for the association to further support playcentres to improve learning outcomes for children.

The association has made some good progress in addressing the recommendations from the previous two cluster reviews. This includes:

  • supporting children’s transitions to school
  • re-establishing the centre managers’ appraisal system
  • improving feedback from the centre support team to parent groups about the quality of teaching and learning.

Further work is required to develop a stronger understanding of the government’s focus on priority learners so that the association can better support parent groups to respond to these children.

There continues to be significant change occurring in the structure of governance and management at association and federation levels. This has had a major impact on the association’s positive response to ERO’s recommendation from the previous cluster review, to document future planning.

Key Next Steps for the Canterbury Playcentre Association

During this cluster review the association has identified, and ERO agrees, that the next steps for the association include:

  • helping parent groups more effectively sustain the developments in bicultural practices, and strengthening the focus on Māori achieving success as Māori
  • reviewing assessment and planning processes to help adults identify children’s learning and the ways that adults can help children with their learning
  • developing a clear understanding of the process of strategic planning at association level and sharing this with parent groups
  • continuing to support and grow emergent leaders in playcentres.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Lyttelton Street Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Lyttelton Street Playcentre will be in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

12 November 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2. Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

70084

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

24 children, including up to 10 aged under two

Service roll

51

Gender composition

Girls 26

Boys 25

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Chinese

French

South African

3

41

2

3

2

Reported ratios of adult to children

Under 2

1:1

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:5

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

12 November 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

October 2011

 

Education Review

June 2007

 

Education Review

June 2004

3. General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Lyttelton Street Playcentre is one of 50 playcentres administrated by the Canterbury Playcentre Association. After the February 2011 earthquake, the playcentre responded positively to the needs of the community by increasing the roll and opening hours. It now operates five morning sessions each week as a parent cooperative.

An enthusiastic and dedicated team of coordinators and parents is responsible for the effective day-to-day operation of the playcentre. Adults work well together to provide a learning environment that values parents as the children’s first educators.

The Canterbury Playcentre Association provides parent education and training to build on parents’ knowledge of child development and learning.

New parents are warmly welcomed by a supportive and inclusive parent group. Children have good opportunities to make new friends and play together.

Other positive features of this playcentre include:

  • the family-group setting where children of mixed ages, including siblings, can play and learn together
  • the high number of parents who stay during session who show an interest in being involved in children’s play
  • a child-focused approach where the child’s emerging interests and preferences are noticed and valued
  • spacious outside play areas that provide a wide range of physical challenges and opportunities for children to learn about the natural world.

The playcentre association provides a specialist team, He Waka Eke Noa, to support understanding and use of tikanga and te reo Māori. The coordinators and parents demonstrate a good understanding of the value to all children of incorporating the Māori culture in the programme. Some parents are making good use of tikanga and te reo Māori during their interactions with children.

The playcentre coordinators and parents have identified, and ERO agrees, that the next steps are to focus on identifying children’s learning in assessment, programme planning and evaluation processes and to increase self-review understandings, capability and sustainability in the parent group.

Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interest of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

2. Review Priorities

The Focus of the Review

Before the review, the management of Lyttelton Street Playcentre was invited to consider its priorities for review using guidelines and resources provided by ERO. ERO also used documentation provided by the centre to contribute to the scope of the review.

The detailed priorities for review were then determined following a discussion between the ERO review team and the management and staff. This discussion focused on existing information held by the centre (including self-review information) and the extent to which potential issues for review contributed to positive outcomes for children atLyttelton Street Playcentre .

All ERO education reviews in early childhood focus on the quality of education. For ERO this includes the quality of:

  • the programme provided for children;
  • the learning environment; and
  • the interactions between children and adults.

ERO’s findings in these areas are set out below.

The Quality of Education

Background

The Lyttelton Street Playcentre philosophy states that parents are the first educators of their children. They will therefore work as a team and include all centre whānau in decision making. They further recognise that children reach their full potential when parents understand their development and take part in the learning process.

Areas of strength

Parent participation

Parent involvement in the centre strongly reflects the playcentre philosophy. Coordinators on each session provide a good level of support to parents. Adults communicate effectively and work well together to foster a positive learning environment for children. They value the diverse skills parents bring to the playcentre community.

The playcentre association offers many opportunities for parent education and training. Adults notice children’s interests and are consistently involved in children’s play.

Relationships

Relationships between children and adults are warm and caring. Children play well with and alongside other children. Siblings can attend the same session. Children enjoy group experiences and the opportunity to develop friendships with one another.

Parents and the coordinators work well together and share information to support children’s learning and well-being. They show a genuine interest in their own and other children’s play. New parents are warmly welcomed by a positive, supportive and inclusive parent group.

Child focused programme

Adults follow children’s emergent interests and preferences in the programme. They offer choices and follow children’s lead in play. The programme provides large periods of uninterrupted time for children to follow interests and extend on play ideas.

Language

Adults listen actively to children and respond to children’s verbal and non-verbal attempts to communicate. Adults affirm and extend children’s language skills. Children enjoy being read and sung to by adults who take time to encourage children’s interest in the stories and music.

Some parents are skilled at supporting the development of children’s knowledge and understanding of te reo and tikanga Māori.

Learning environment

Children benefit from a well-organised learning environment. Children choose from a good variety of resources and play experiences, including natural materials. Adults change the environment and provide additional resources to build on children’s ideas and interests during the session.

Children make good use of the spacious, outdoor area that provides a wide range of physical challenges and opportunities for them to learn about the natural world.

Areas for development and review

Children’s interests and participation in the programme are well documented by adults. The playcentre coordinators and parents have identified, and ERO agrees, that the next steps are to focus more on identifying children’s learning in assessment, programme planning and evaluation, and to develop self review further.

The coordinators and parent group, with the support of the association, now need to:

strengthen the analysis of children’s learning and next steps adults can consider to extend children’s learning

  • show how children’s learning progresses over time
  • use assessment information to plan the programme
  • ensure that programme planning and evaluation focuses on:
  • identifying appropriate learning outcomes for children
  • developing strategies for adults to use when supporting children’s learning.

The coordinators and parent group, with the support of the association, need to:

  • increase self-review understandings, capability and sustainability in the parent led team
  • develop a strategic approach to self review to guide the regular review of policies and in-depth reviews with a focus on teaching and learning.

3. National Evaluation Topic

Overview

ERO provides information about the education system as a whole through its national reports. This information will be used as the basis for long-term and systemic educational improvement.

Partnerships with Whānau of Māori Children in Early Childhood Services

As part of this review, ERO evaluated the extent to which:

  • this service understands and values the identity, language and culture of Māori children and their whānau, particularly when the child and whānau transition to the service
  • managers and educators have built relationships with whānau of Māori children
  • this service works in partnership with whānau of Māori children.

Background

The playcentre association has specific policies that outline the association’s responsibilities towards implementing bicultural partnerships in all the Canterbury playcentres. The association provides a specialist team, He Waka Eke Noa, to support playcentre parents’ understanding and use of tikanga and te reo Māori.

Areas of strength

The centre culture strongly reflects Māori values. The coordinators and parents demonstrate a good understanding of the value to all children of incorporating the Māori culture in the programme. Some parents are making good use of tikanga and te reo Māori during their conversations with children. Excursions into the community provide further opportunities for children and their families to be involved in celebrations significant to Māori and to hear legends retold by the bicultural support team.

4. Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff of Lyttelton Street Playcentre completed an ERO CentreAssurance Statement andSelf-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • administration
  • health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial and property management.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s documentation, including policies, procedures and records of recent use of procedures. ERO also checked elements of the following areas that have a potentially high impact on outcomes for children:

  • emotional safety (including behaviour management, prevention of bullying and abuse)
  • physical safety (including behaviour management, sleeping and supervision practices; accidents and medication; hygiene and routines; travel and excursion policies and procedures)
  • staff qualifications and organisation
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

In order to improve current practice the parent group should:

  • consistently monitor the documentation of health and safety practices, such as excursions, to ensure that centre procedures are consistently followed
  • secure shelving to prevent injury in the event of an earthquake.

5. Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interest of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

About the Centre

Type

All Day Early Childhood Education and Care Centre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Centres) Regulations 1998

Number licensed for

25 children, including up to 10 under two years

Roll number

61

Gender composition

Boys 32;

Girls 29

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Pākehā 56;

Māori 5

Review team on site

June 2011

Date of this report

19 October 2011

Previous three ERO reports

Education Review June 2007

Education Review June 2004

Accountability Review December 1997

To the Parents and Community of Lyttelton Street Playcentre

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Lyttelton Street Playcentre .

Lyttelton Street Playcentre is one of 50 playcentres administrated by the Canterbury Playcentre Association. After the February 2011 earthquake, the playcentre responded positively to the needs of the community by increasing the roll and opening hours. It now operates five morning sessions each week as a parent cooperative.

An enthusiastic and dedicated team of coordinators and parents is responsible for the effective day-to-day operation of the playcentre. Adults work well together to provide a learning environment that values parents as the children’s first educators.

The Canterbury Playcentre Association provides parent education and training to build on parents’ knowledge of child development and learning.

New parents are warmly welcomed by a supportive and inclusive parent group. Children have good opportunities to make new friends and play together.

Other positive features of this playcentre include:

  • the family-group setting where children of mixed ages, including siblings, can play and learn together
  • the high number of parents who stay during session who show an interest in being involved in children’s play
  • a child-focused approach where the child’s emerging interests and preferences are noticed and valued
  • spacious outside play areas that provide a wide range of physical challenges and opportunities for children to learn about the natural world.

The playcentre association provides a specialist team, He Waka Eke Noa, to support understanding and use of tikanga and te reo Māori. The coordinators and parents demonstrate a good understanding of the value to all children of incorporating the Māori culture in the programme. Some parents are making good use of tikanga and te reo Māori during their interactions with children.

The playcentre coordinators and parents have identified, and ERO agrees, that the next steps are to focus on identifying children’s learning in assessment, programme planning and evaluation processes and to increase self-review understandings, capability and sustainability in the parent group.

Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interest of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again in three years.

When ERO has reviewed an early childhood centre we encourage management to inform their community of any follow up action they plan to take. You should talk to the management or contact person if you have any questions about this evaluation, the full ERO report or their future intentions.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the centre or see the ERO website, http://www.ero.govt.nz. 

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region