Te Matauranga

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Education institution number:
6741
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Bilingual Year 7 and Year 8 School
Total roll:
359
Telephone:
Address:

206 Finlayson Avenue, Clendon Park, Auckland

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Summary

Te Mātauranga, in Clendon Park, Manurewa, is a contributing primary school, with some Year 7 and 8 classes. Currently there are 412 children on the roll. Māori children make up 30 percent of the roll and 60 percent have Pacific heritage. Samoan children are the largest group in the school. Puna’oa o Le Atamai, the school’s Samoan bilingual unit, includes four classes and caters for children up to Year 8.

The board has an experienced chairperson and elected trustees from diverse community backgrounds. The experienced co-principals work alongside two recently appointed school leaders who are responsible for literacy and mathematics. Since the 2012 ERO evaluation, a staff member has been appointed to teach te reo me ōna tikanga Māori to all children in the school.

The school has a clear vision for future-focused education that values all children as capable learners. Most children, including those in Te Puna’oa o Le Atamai, achieve very well in relation to the National Standards. There has been sustained improvement in achievement levels over the past five years.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school’s processes that enable achievement of equity and excellence are highly effective. Leaders and teachers have developed the capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children at risk of not achieving their potential. Small levels of disparity between Māori learners and the rest of the school have been systematically reduced over time.

Leaders and teachers are committed to deliberate actions that support any child whose learning is at risk. Staff professional development continues to be targeted to support improved teaching practices and learning outcomes.

Tracking systems, internal moderation and evaluation are used well to support teachers’ judgements about achievement in relation to the National Standards. There are also opportunities for assessment moderation with other local schools and across the wider Auckland network of Samoan bilingual units.

To enhance the school’s processes for achieving equity and excellence for all, it would be beneficial to focus further internal evaluation around success for Māori learners, as Māori.

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. The school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds very effectively to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration. Achievement information shows that most children achieve very well by the end of their time at the school. Approximately 80 percent of children achieve at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

Most Māori children achieve at or above the National Standards by the end of their time at Te Matauranga. Their achievement levels have consistently improved since 2012. Leaders and teachers evaluate achievement data deeply and plan deliberate actions with their staff at team and class teacher levels.

Target learners and groups are identified quickly at the beginning of and throughout the year. Leaders recognise the importance of prompt, planned responses to accelerate learning progress. Tracking and monitoring systems rigorously follow children’s progress towards achievement.

School leaders and teachers place a high value on knowing their learners and whānau well. Affirming and caring relationships are at the heart of children’s learning success.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s processes that enable achievement of equity and excellence are highly effective. Systems and processes are systematically evaluated to ensure good outcomes for children.

Children enjoy creative and innovative learning opportunities that engage them closely and contribute to their high levels of achievement in relation to the National Standards. School approaches promote student ownership of learning and children confidently articulate their ideas and opinions.

Curriculum programmes are inclusive and designed to enable all children, including those with additional learning needs, to participate and contribute. Parents are becoming increasingly involved with their children’s learning and participate in conferencing for goal-setting and home learning.

Learning activities are increasingly future-focused and solutions driven. Collaborative programmes that heighten critical and creative problem solving are positioned in the curriculum as essential for success. The digital environment in the school supports and enhances children’s connection to learning. Several classes now have opportunities to use robotics as a key driver for learning that stimulates students’ thinking and creativity. Children move quickly from local to global understandings that equip them to develop capabilities and competencies for the future.

The Puna’oa o Le Atamai unit offers clear benefits for children who are affirmed in their language, culture and identity. Readiness for learning and resilience to persevere are developed through school processes that support all learners. School leaders and teachers proactively support children and their families through pastoral care systems that utilise community organisations and agencies to address needs.

Through targeted professional development, teachers continue to strengthen their practices and adapt and use approaches and strategies that have the potential to make a difference for all learners. They openly reflect on and share best practice. All teachers engage in professional learning communities within the school.

The board is focused on its stewardship responsibilities. Trustees ensure that school policies and procedures guide and reflect school practices. They work hard to resource the requirements of leaders, teachers and learners so that all children have equitable opportunities to learn.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

School processes promote equity and excellence effectively for all learners, through high quality practices that are sustainable, coherent and forward thinking.

ERO identified and discussed with school leaders and the board how further consideration could be given to internal evaluation of the school’s responsibility to promote Māori learners’ success. Using Hautū: Māori Cultural Responsiveness Self Review tool for Board of Trustees is likely to support this process.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. The school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

7 September 2017

About the school 

Location

Clendon Park, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

6741

School type

Contributing

School roll

412

Gender composition

Boys 53%

Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori 30%

NZ Pākehā 1%

Samoan 38%

Tongan 9%

Cook Islands Māori 7%`

Indian 5%

Fijian 5%

other 4%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

7 September 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, September 2012

Education Review, December 2009

Education Review, October 2006

 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Te Mātauranga in Clendon Park, Manurewa, is a contributing primary school with a predominantly Māori and Pacific student roll. The school includes a Samoan bilingual programme that provides learning through gagana Samoa and retains students through to Year 8.

The school is led by two co-principals who share a belief that positive relationships make a difference to student achievement and progress. Te Mātauranga School has had a history of good ERO reports. Leaders and teachers have been responsive to recommendations and areas for development identified in the 2009 ERO report.

The board and staff are knowledgeable about their community and have developed inclusive and supportive relationships with their parents, families, whānau and aiga. Pastoral care of students is a significant feature of the school. The school’s pastoral staff work with other agencies to provide an effective wrap-around service for children needing extra support.

The board of trustees, leaders, teachers and parents, see learning as their highest priority. Teachers deliberately encourage students to learn successfully through their culture. Children and parents express a sense of belonging to the school and benefit from the philosophy and vision of the school which is to inspire and encourage learners to experience success.

2 Learning

How well are students learning – engaging, progressing and achieving?

Students at Te Mātauranga School are actively engaged and are progressing and achieving very well. Students are seen by teachers as capable learners and are well supported to achieve and value themselves as powerful thinkers. Students know about their achievements, set meaningful learning goals and are able to identify what they need to do to progress further.

School information shows that students make significant progress over their time at Te Mātauranga School. By Year 6, the majority of students achieve at National Standards for reading, writing and mathematics. Parents receive good quality information that helps them support their children’s learning.

The co principals’ leadership drives and promotes students success in learning and achievement. Effective teaching and responsive support initiatives are highly evident. School leaders and teachers understand and use National Standards to support the progress of all students. Individual Māori student achievement is analysed, discussed and used by teachers to plan programmes and design approaches for student’s specific learning needs.

Teachers know students well and are responsive to their learning needs. They design flexible programmes which are highly inclusive of children with special needs.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum effectively promotes and supports student learning. The school has a flexible, localised curriculum which reflects student’s interests and aspirations, and aligns well The New Zealand Curriculum principles. Biculturalism and multiculturalism are at the core of the school’s curriculum. Teachers and students use relevant and engaging themes that include Pacific and Māori values. Teachers promote opportunities for students to think critically and problem solve for higher level challenges.

Teachers promote student learning effectively. Students are able to use their cultural knowledge to help them understand what they are learning. There is a culture of respect and appreciation throughout the school. Students are motivated and inspired to learn and realise their potential. Teachers are focused on improvement and regularly review their teaching practice. Classroom programmes integrate literacy well across the curriculum.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school’s curriculum provides opportunities for Māori students to experience success as Māori. Māori whanau and families attend individual student conferences to discuss their children’s progress and support student goal setting. School leaders are committed to ensuring Māori students are engaged in learning. A support network operates effectively for Māori students and their whānau.

Māori students have a sense of belonging to the school, feel that teachers take an interest in them as Māori, and support them as capable learners. To enhance Māori students’ sense of belonging to the school, teachers could explore more authentic contexts for learning and encourage all students’ understanding of tikanga Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Te Mātauranga is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The school is governed by a skilled and supportive board of trustees who are committed to the school’s strategic goals and have a strong belief that students can achieve. Trustees are well informed about the community and work collaboratively with the co-principals to ensure that good employment practices are in place. The board and managers promote students’ emotional and cultural wellbeing and have high expectations for learning in the school.

Broad targets are set to raise achievement in reading, writing, and maths. The board and school leaders’ partnership with parents has resulted in the implementation of culturally responsive initiatives that support student learning. These include the naming of the school and the establishment and resourcing of the Samoan bilingual unit.

The co-principals and management team provide cohesive leadership and build relationships based on trust. Together with the board, they share a collective sense of purpose based on learning and demonstrate an enthusiastic commitment to achieving good outcomes for students. They are dedicated to ensuring that the school’s values, tone, climate and culture provide a safe and secure environment as well as promote student progress and achievement.

School leaders have a clear strategic goal to continue with their robust school-wide self review and to accelerate progress for all students. They also plan to strengthen the use of student achievement information to improve student outcomes and to monitor progress towards their strategic goals.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Makere Smith

National Manager Review Services Northern Region (Acting)

17 September 2012

About the School

Location

Clendon Park, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

6741

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

437

Gender composition

Boys 55% Girls 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

Cook Island Māori

Tongan

Indian

Fijian

30%

3%

41%

9%

7%

6%

4%

Special Features

Samoan bilingual unit Year 1 to 8

Review team on site

August 2012

Date of this report

17 September 2012

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review 

December 2009

October 2006