Murupara Area School

Education institution number:
658
School type:
Composite
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
171
Telephone:
Address:

84 Pine Drive, Murupara

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Murupara Area School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 6 months of the Education Review Office and Murupara Area School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Murupara Area School, located in the rural township of Murupara, is within the boundaries of Ngāti Manawa. It has students in Years 1 to 13. An acting principal and leadership team lead the school. To build capability for change, the Ministry of Education is providing support within the school through the appointment of a Limited Statutory Manager.  

Murupara Area School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are to: 

  • develop quality teaching and learning programmes that reflect a localised, ākonga-centred curriculum 

  • improve student attendance 

  • improve student engagement to ensure all students achieve their potential. 

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Murupara Area School’s website. 

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate the extent to which leaders and staff are developing coherent learning pathways to respond to students’ learning needs, and in ways that enhance learners’ identity as Māori. 

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • to further empower students to take responsibility for their own learning 

  • to develop a consistent and coherent language of learning across the school that leaders, teachers, students and whānau understand 

  • to further strengthen the ways that programmes of work engage students and enhance their identity as Māori and as Ngāti Manawa. 

The school expects to see greater numbers of students attending regularly, engaged in learning, and making accelerated progress, particularly those learners who are at risk of not achieving. 

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support its goal to evaluate the extent to which coherent, responsive learning pathways are developed, and the identity of Māori learners enhanced: 

  • strong links with the local iwi, Ngāti Manawa 

  • strong networks with a range of community agencies who provide specialist support to individuals and groups of students 

  • students who demonstrate a strong sense of belonging and connection to the school. 

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise the development and use of:  

  • a schoolwide learning progressions framework in literacy and mathematics to ensure targeted teaching and learning for improved learner outcomes 

  • a coherent schoolwide approach to the teaching of Ngāti Manawa history and traditions to enhance Māori learner identity 

  • teaching strategies that provide opportunity for student voice and agency in their learning. 

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.  

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

3 November 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Murupara Area School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2023 to 2026

As of February 2023, the Murupara Area School, School Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Actions for Compliance  

ERO and the board have identified the following areas of non-compliance during the board assurance process:  

  1. establish a comprehensive framework of policies, procedures that are regularly reviewed  

  2. consult with the community on the health curriculum. 

[Education and Training Act 2020] 

The board is addressing the areas of non-compliance identified. 

Further Information

For further information please contact Murupara Area School, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

3 November 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Murupara Area School - 28/05/2018

Findings

Murupara Area School has made significant progress in all areas identified for review and development. The leadership team is working cohesively with staff, trustees, whānau, iwi and the community to provide better educational outcomes for students. Students are working in a calm, settled environment conducive to learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

Murupara Area School opened as a new re-designated school in 2013 as a result of the merger between the local primary and secondary schools. In 2014, as part of ERO’s New School’s Assurance process, the review found the board and staff faced significant operating challenges. This continued to be an issue in the ERO review of 2015. A new senior leadership team including the principal, deputy principal and assistant principal was subsequently appointed. During this period, a Limited Statutory Manager (LSM), appointed by the Ministry of Education, has supported the board and principal with governance, finance and personnel matters.

Most students affiliate to Ngāti Manawa and the values of integrity, respect, aroha, whanaungatanga, kotahitanga and ako are highly evident in the school. The school is supported by the whakaruruhau that are active in the community, providing pastoral care networks as well as advising in all aspects of Ngāti Manawatanga kawa, reo and tikanga Māori. In 2016, innovative learning facilities, including the gymnasium built in partnership with the community, were completed to enhance teaching and learning and the physical environment.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development
  • assessment capability and moderation in Years 1-13
  • targets and action plans to accelerate at-risk learners
  • curriculum review and delivery
  • student agency
  • teaching and learning practices
  • governance
  • internal evaluation
  • performance management including appraisal.
Progress

There has been significant progress made in all areas identified for review and development including some noticeable improvements in school culture. ERO observed students working in a calm and settled environment. New appointments to the senior leadership team bring a range of complementary skills and leaders work well together. The new board chair and trustees have established a positive working relationship with the LSM. The school has set clear, specific and achievable targets.

Assessment capability and moderation Years 1- 13

The reliability and dependability of overall teacher judgements has been strengthened. Leaders have implemented appropriate systems and processes to support teachers to build their assessment and moderation capability. Ongoing moderation across the junior school has improved the consistency and validity of teacher judgements. In the senior school, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) has improved confidence in the reliability of the school’s National Certificate of Education Achievement (NCEA) assessments and grades and has put the school back on its regular review cycle. Leaders are building teacher capability in the use of the Learning Progressions Framework (LPF) in Years 1-10.

Targets and action plans to accelerate at risk learners

The school has developed effective targets and action plans to accelerate the progress of at-risk students in Years 1 to 6. Almost all students coming in as new entrants are below expected levels in oral language, letter and number recognition. Appropriate interventions and initiatives such as an oral language programme and the play-based approach to learning have been implemented to accelerate the progress of these students. These programmes and approaches have had a significant impact on accelerating the learning and ensuring more equitable outcomes for almost all identified at-risk students. Data on accelerated progress and achievement over time shows that by the end of Year 6, 84% of students were at the expected curriculum level in reading and 75% in writing and mathematics. Work is being done to continue these positive trajectories from Years 7 to 10.

Curriculum review and delivery

Leaders have developed a more responsive curriculum informed by internal evaluation. The curriculum review has been strategic, systematic and well considered. There has been a deliberate focus on establishing community networks that broaden students’ experiences and enhance learning outcomes. These include educational partnerships with trades and tertiary providers, local community and national organisations. Students benefit from a curriculum that is more coherent and meaningful, and which provides responsive, individualised learning pathways within and beyond school.

Teaching and learning

The quality of teaching and learning has significantly improved. Leaders have developed high expectations for teaching and learning across the school. Teachers promote respectful relationships with and between students. Staff know students well and are responsive, sensitive and respectful of the individual students’ strengths and challenges. ERO observed some examples of effective practice including:

  • the use of data to inform planning and a focus on at-risk students through differentiated learning tasks to suit individual needs
  • formative assessment strategies such as sharing learning intentions, success criteria, verbal and documented feedback and feed forward
  • use of the learning progressions to develop student agency and accelerate learning.

Building the collective capacity of teachers in implementing these effective strategies across the school is an ongoing priority.

Governance

The board has made very positive progress in addressing operational and governance issues facing the school. Trustees have a positive working relationship with the principal, leadership team, staff and community. They have a clear focus on improving the retention of students to the senior school, and providing meaningful pathways for all students.

Trustees value student voice and regularly consult with students and the wider community. The board of trustees is strategically resourcing several initiatives to provide more equitable opportunities and positive outcomes for students.

Improved governance practices are supporting the school to realise its vision and values for raising levels of student achievement. Trustees are open to learning, have a clear understanding of their role as governors, and are benefiting from support and guidance provided by the LSM. The LSM will continue in his involvement with the school until the end of 2018 to support recently elected trustees.

Internal evaluation

The school has developed a useful framework and robust process for effective internal evaluation focused on improving student achievement. The senior leadership team usesdata well to inform self review and evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum, support programmes and interventions.

Appraisals and performance management

Leaders have a strategic and coherent approach to appraisal, performance management and providing professional development to build professional capability and collective capacity. Effective self review is helping to ensure that the school is responsive to the interests and needs of students.

Key next steps

Senior leaders, trustees now need to:

  • continue to explore opportunities for external moderation of assessments in the junior and senior school
  • provide ongoing professional learning and development to build coherent assessment practice across the school, especially in Years 9 and 10
  • continue to provide professional learning and development to build teacher capability in their understanding of acceleration, and the effective use of data to inform planning and implement strategies to accelerate the progress and achievement of at risk learners
  • align charter targets with at-risk learners and regularly track, monitor and report on their progress throughout the year
  • strengthen and embed the effective teaching practices evident across the school and teacher confidence and capability in the use of restorative practices
  • ensure the meaningful integration of local contexts, Māori history, te reo and tikanga Māori across the curriculum, and consult with Ngāti Manawa to ascertain the aspirations they have for their tamariki.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

Murupara Area School is now better placed to sustain and continue its performance. Factors contributing to sustainability are that:

  • the school  has a capable board which is working well with the LSM in managing school finances and personnel
  • the principal and deputy principals have gained experience in their roles and are providing strong leadership across the school
  • effective systems are in place to monitor student progress, acceleration and achievement
  • there is now greater collegiality and cooperation amongst staff
  • students are settled and have access to good quality educational opportunities.

Key next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • targeted planning to accelerate learning
    [ERO will monitor and discuss progress with the school]
  • internal evaluation processes and practices.
    [ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop for trustees and senior leaders]

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Murupara Area School has made significant progress in all areas identified for review and development. The leadership team is working cohesively with staff, trustees, whānau, iwi and the community to provide better educational outcomes for students. Students are working in a calm, settled environment conducive to learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

28 May 2018

About the School

Location

Murupara

Ministry of Education profile number

658

School type

Composite (Years 1 to 13)

School roll

339

Gender composition

Boys 60% Girls 40%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other

96%
2%
2%

Review team on site

April 2018

Date of this report

28 May 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Special Review

February 2016
October 2014

Murupara Area School - 29/02/2016

Findings

Murupara Area School (Years 1 to 13) has a strong connection to Ngati Manawa. The new school facility promotes collaborative teaching and learning. The new senior leadership team has identified several areas for improvement. Attendance has improved as a result of a deliberate focus. Similar improvement is needed in student achievement.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years. 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Murupara Area School opened as a new school in 2013 as the result of the merger of the local primary and secondary schools. It caters for students in Years 1 to 13. Most students affiliate to Ngati Manawa. The values, tikanga and reo of Ngati Manawa are highly evident throughout the school.

The school is still operating across the two original sites. Innovative learning environments and refurbished specialist teaching areas are features of new facilities being built at the former primary school. The main teaching block is already in use. Further spaces, including a gymnasium to be built in partnership with the community, will be completed during 2016.

A limited statutory manager supports the board and principal with finance and personnel matters. A new principal and deputy principal were appointed earlier this year and an associate principal has been recently employed. This new leadership team brings renewed teaching and leadership experience to the school.

Senior leaders’ aspirations for the school are well matched to the vision that evolved from Ka Awatea, a community- driven initiative focused on raising student achievement by providing high quality teaching for Ngati Manawa students.

The 2014 ERO New Schools Assurance review found that the board faced significant challenges in managing finances, personnel, student attendance, student engagement and student achievement. Good progress has been made in relation to managing finances, personnel and student attendance.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Teachers are still not able to demonstrate that they are using student achievement information to promote positive outcomes for students. The school is still developing systems to ensure that teachers use achievement data effectively.

Concerns about student achievement are compounded by a lack of reliable and valid achievement information that can be used to monitor progress, to plan interventions that are likely to promote achievement and to evaluate the effectiveness of decisions made at all levels.

The new senior leadership team is developing plans to address concerns about student achievement. In order to improve practice trustees, senior leaders and teachers need to act urgently to:

  • establish effective, coherent assessment practices across the school
  • set targets for student achievement that focus teachers on students at risk of not achieving
  • accelerate the progress of target students
  • use information about student achievement to inform teachers’ planning
  • ensure students know about their progress and achievement so that they can plan for their next steps in learning.

Younger students are more engaged in learning than the older students. In order to support their learning particularly teachers in the junior area need also to:

  • fully implement National Standards by more accurately and consistently forming overall teacher judgements (OTJs) and ensuring anniversary reporting is in place for students after 1, 2 and 3 years at school
  • improve reporting to parents by using plain language, making achievement in relation to National Standards clear and finding ways to report about science, social studies, technology and the arts.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

There is a strong focus on Ngati Manawa tikanga throughout the school day. This focus has resulted from deliberate strategies implemented early in 2015. The emphasis on Ngati Manawa whakapapa, waiata, and korero is a significant and positive influence on the culture of the school.

Teachers have identified the need to build some students’ oral language as they begin school. This has become a focus for teaching in the Year 1 area. Literacy and numeracy are emphasised for primary age students.

Students of similar age learn together in flexible learning spaces. They learn in settled and organised environments. Teachers plan and work collaboratively to provide programmes of work for students. Students are increasingly proud of their school.

Student engagement continues to challenge trustees, school leaders and teachers. Secondary students are the group who have been most affected by the school redevelopment project. They learn from specialist teachers on the site of the former secondary school and share a flexible teaching space within the new main building. As a result it is taking some time for some of these students to engage with the new kaupapa of the school.

Younger students are particularly keen to learn. They willingly share their enthusiasm for learning with adults and visitors. Primary students have a good understanding of the tasks they are asked to complete. Many are able to relate their achievement to relevant stages or levels. Their positive attitude to school provides a strong foundation for teachers to build on.

Attendance has improved. While attendance does drop off for some senior students, there is clear improvement across the school. This improvement is attributed to strategies designed to increase the collective responsibility of the school and community for following up absences. This good practice is ongoing. Teachers need now to consider their role in establishing effective relationships with students and how they can plan programmes that will better engage students of all ages.

There is an increased focus on creating vocational pathways for secondary students. Partnerships have been established with organisations that could potentially provide authentic and relevant learning opportunities. Senior leaders are optimistic about the impact these partnerships could have on the education and futures for senior students.

Senior leaders have identified the need to review the vision for learning to ensure:

  • the school’s curriculum reflects the innovative learning practices that are essential to the effective use of the flexible learning spaces
  • teachers develop a shared understanding of effective innovative teaching practice based on formative teaching practice, student ownership of their learning and the strategic use of digital technologies to support teaching and learning
  • NCEA course credits and achievement requirements are equitable across learning areas.

Effective induction processes for teachers will need to be in place to help embed new expectations of teaching practices.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students are affirmed in their language, culture and identity. Ngati Manawa tikanga has been considerably strengthened within the school. It is now embedded across the school day and is a source of pride for the school and community.

Whakaruruhau, a group representing Ngati Manawa and other iwi interests, supports and advises the school. They provide a strong link to the community and have the potential to transform relationships with hard to reach groups.

The strength that Ngati Manawa tikanga affords the students and teachers is a good foundation from which to build the educational success aspired to in Ka Awatea.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is not yet well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The board is effectively led. Trustees undertake training as a group and find this learning to be helpful to their governance roles. The limited statutory manager provides additional support.

Partnerships between school and home have been strengthened. As a result whānau more regularly visit the school and participate alongside their children.

The board works cohesively for the good of the school. Trustees confidently interrogate student achievement data and appropriately challenge reports they receive. They also know that better outcomes for students are necessary. Effective working relationships exist between the board and the principal. Trustees support the principal well to network with and understand the community.

The new senior leadership team has the capacity to improve teaching and learning in the school. Senior leaders bring individual strengths and experiences to their roles. They are developing a shared vision for the possibilities offered through the innovative learning environments.

Senior leaders have good awareness of the challenges the school has yet to overcome. Although the building process will continue to impose some constraints on how programmes are provided for students, urgency is essential in addressing the main areas of concern.

Reviews of some important matters have been undertaken. Self review could be strengthened by documenting and implementing a robust process for evaluating the effectiveness of programmes, initiatives, interventions and decisions.

In order to improve school performance and better promote positive outcomes for students, a concerted approach is necessary by the board and senior leaders to:

  • Improve processes that ensure the board meets its legislative objections
  • strengthen strategic and annual planning to prioritise and closely monitor areas for development
  • prioritise and complete update and review of key policies, including Education Outside the Classroom and Child Protection
  • monitor the effectiveness of programmes, interventions and initiatives such as student achievement targets, provision for children with special needs and how well teachers are meeting school expectations for teaching and learning
  • strengthen performance management so that it aligns with and supports school directions, meets teacher registration requirements and uses teaching as inquiry to reflect on and improve teaching practice.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Recommendations to other agencies

ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education support the school to better engage students in their learning and to promote student achievement.

Conclusion

Murupara Area School (Years 1 to 13) has a strong connection to Ngati Manawa. The new school facility promotes collaborative teaching and learning. The new senior leadership team has identified several areas for improvement. Attendance has improved as a result of a deliberate focus. Similar improvement is needed in student achievement.

ERO intends to carry out another review over the course of one-to-two years. 

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

29 February 2016

School Statistics

Location

Murupara

Ministry of Education profile number

658

School type

Composite (Years 1 to 13)

School roll

339

Gender composition

Boys 59% Girls 41%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

96%

4%

Special Features

Early Childhood Centre on site

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

29 February 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Special Review

October 2014