Countrylife Educare Ltd

Education institution number:
60118
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
33
Telephone:
Address:

83 Woodburn Drive, Tawa, Wellington

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ERO’s Akanuku | Assurance Review reports provide information about whether a service meets and maintains regulatory standards. Further information about Akanuku | Assurance Reviews is included at the end of this report.

ERO’s Judgement

Regulatory standards
ERO’s judgement

Curriculum

Meeting

Premises and facilities

Meeting

Health and safety

Not meeting

Governance, management and administration

Meeting

At the time of the review, ERO identified non-compliance with health and safety standards that must be addressed.

Background

CountryLife Educare Ltd is a privately owned service in a rural setting in the Takapu Valley. The owners purchased the service in October 2017. The centre is licensed to provide education and care for up to 35 children, including five under two years. The owners manage the day-to-day operation of the service.

Summary of Review Findings

The service curriculum is consistent with Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. Strategies are in place to involve parents and whānau in their children’s learning. Teachers are responsive to individual children’s interests and preferences and promote their developing social competence. Collaboration with external agencies to support children is evident.

The design and layout of the premises support the provision of different types of indoor and outdoor experiences. Consistent implementation of health and safety practices is required to meet all aspects of regulatory compliance.

Actions for Compliance

ERO found areas of non-compliance in the service relating to:

  • a current fire evacuation scheme approved by the New Zealand Fire Service
  • identifying, eliminating, minimising or isolating hazards, including the fixing of equipment that could topple and cause harm
  • a written emergency plan includes a list of safety and emergency supplies and resources sufficient for the age and number of children and adults at the service, and details of how these will be maintained and accessed in an emergency. Evidence of review of the emergency plans on, at least, an annual basis and implementation of improved practices as required
  • an evaluation of the drills to inform the annual review of the service’s emergency plan
  • the analysis of accident and incident records to identify hazards and appropriate actions are taken
  • evidence of parental permission and approval of adult: child ratios for special excursions
  • assessment and management of risk when children leave the premises on a regular or special excursion
  • records of all food served, showing the type of food available for inspection for 3 months after the food has been served.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Services, 2008, HS4, HS6, HS7, HS8, HS12, HS17, HS19.

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed the following non-compliances:

  • equipment not stored safely
  • stretchers not made of or securely covered by a non-porous material
  • the designated sleep space not designed to minimise fluctuations in temperature
  • monitoring the temperature of warm water delivered from taps to children
  • ensuring rooms are kept at a comfortable temperature no lower than 16 degrees at 500 mm above the floor
  • the availability of the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008 for parents and visitors to access.

Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Services, 2008, PF8, PF30, PF37, HS13, HS24, GMA1.

Recommendation to Ministry of Education

ERO recommends the Ministry follows up with the service provider to ensure that non-compliances identified in this report are addressed promptly.

Next ERO Review

The next ERO review of CountryLife Educare Ltd will be in consultation with the Ministry of Education.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Director Review and Improvement Services (Southern)

Southern Region | Te Tai Tini

29 October 2020

Information About the Service

Early Childhood Service Name

CountryLife Educare Ltd

Profile Number

60118

Location

Wellington

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

35 children, including up to 5 aged under 2

Percentage of qualified teachers

50-79%

Service roll

32

Gender composition

Male 14, Female 18

Ethnic composition

Māori 5
NZ European/Pākehā 16
Other ethnicities 11

Review team on site

September 2020

Date of this report

29 October 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

First ERO review of the service.

General Information about Assurance Reviews

All services are licensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The legal requirements for early childhood services also include the Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008.

Services must meet the standards in the regulations and the requirements of the licensing criteria to gain and maintain a licence to operate.

ERO undertakes an Akanuku | Assurance Review process in any centre-based service:

  • having its first ERO review – including if it is part of a governing organisation
  • previously identified as ‘not well placed’ or ‘requiring further development’
  • that has moved from a provisional to a full licence
  • that have been re-licenced due to a change of ownership
  • where an Akanuku | Assurance Review process is determined to be appropriate.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. Before the review, the staff and management of a service completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO assesses whether the regulated standards are being met. In particular, ERO looks at a service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher certification; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO also gathers and records evidence through:

  • discussions with those involved in the service
  • consideration of relevant documentation, including the implementation of health and safety systems
  • observations of the environment/premises, curriculum implementation and teaching practice.

1 Evaluation of Countrylife Daycare

How well placed is Countrylife Daycare to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

This privately owned and managed centre is located in a rural setting in the Takapu valley. The newly-formed teaching team has been together since January 2014. The number of children enrolled has grown since the start of the year.

The supervisor is fully qualified and registered. She provides advice and guidance to the provisionally registered teacher. A third teacher is primary trained. Two additional teachers, while having considerable early childhood experience, are not formally qualified.

Areas identified for improvement in ERO’s 2011 report have been, or are in the process of being addressed.

The Review Findings

The centre’s vision, philosophy and practice align well. The philosophy is evident in practice.

Children are confident to express themselves freely. Teachers show that the child’s feelings matter. Independence and self management within routines is encouraged and is shown, even by very young children. Adults closely observe and respond to infants' and toddlers' non verbal cues. Young children can observe and interact with older children during communal times. Experiences for young children are stimulating and challenging. They learn about the natural world in authentic contexts.

Programme planning is responsive to children’s observed interests, strengths and developmental needs. Recent review of assessment, planning and evaluation practices has strengthened the team’s ability to plan for individuals and groups. The newly developed planning framework is likely to lead to ongoing improvement in teacher practice.

Teachers know the children well and develop strategies to meet identified interests. Good communication with parents helps ensure that aspirations for their children are included in planning. A formalised structure for fortnightly meetings ensures that the team focus stays on children’s interests and outcomes.

Well-presented profile books identify each child’s participation, interests and learning, with friendships and sharing being common themes. Those for children up to two years of age include frequent references to children’s progress in relation to communication and exploration. Learning stories seldom include the use of parents' voices and appropriate cultural reference. This is an area for teachers to consider further.

Implementation of the bicultural programme is becoming established within the new team and is evident in the physical environment. Aspects of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are being integrated into the programme. Staff recognise that their practice in these areas require strengthening.

The supervisor demonstrates a good understanding of what success for Māori children as Māori looks like. This could be extended to include using a child’s cultural knowledge and skills to mentor peers and take leadership roles.

A strong sense of team is developing. The supervisor is the educational leader. All teachers have opportunities to take on roles of responsibility. A range of good teaching is evident.

Self-review processes have been redeveloped. Although in the early stages of implementation, improvements in the quality of programme planning, assessment and evaluation are evident. The supervisor demonstrates a good understanding of the review cycle. ERO sees the need to continue with the present focus on quality review processes.

The goals of the 2014 annual plan differ from those described in the 2011 to 2015 strategic plan. The owner, who is also the manager, has identified that these will be reviewed in consultation with new staff and parents.

Progress has been made in revising the appraisal process. ERO considers that the changes be implemented immediately and should include:

  • observations over time, by the appraiser or peers, that affirm good practice and identify constructive steps for future development
  • centre wide development goals that link to strategic and annual planning goals
  • clear links to professional development.

Key Next Steps

ERO, the manager and supervisor agree that key next steps include:

  • reviewing the strategic plan
  • strengthening teachers’ use and integration of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori
  • appointing a trained and registered teacher to oversee the infant and toddler’s room
  • maintaining the self review focus on the quality of programme planning, assessment and evaluation
  • implementing an appraisal process.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Countrylife Daycare completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

In order to improve current practice, some management processes need strengthening.

During the review ERO noted that police vetting had not occurred since the 2011 ERO review. This has since been addressed.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Countrylife Daycare will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

15 July 2014

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tawa, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

60118

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

39

Gender composition

Girls 22,

Boys 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Sri Lankan

Chinese

German

Japanese

Danish

3

27

3

2

2

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

50-79%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:6

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2014

Date of this report

15 July 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.