Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road

Education institution number:
5623
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
43
Telephone:
Address:

20 Rushton Road, Morrinsville

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1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road is located in the rural township of Morrinsville. It is licensed for 40 children over the age of two years. Currently there are 45 children enrolled, including 16 who identify as Māori.

The kindergarten’s philosophy is underpinned by Te Whāriki and Te Whatu Pōkeka and is embodied in a whakairo 'Whakaaro nui'. This is a valued taonga of the kindergarten and represents commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi, and symbolises people and places from past, present and future, who are part of the kindergarten community.

The kindergarten operates under the governance and management of the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust, a community not-for-profit organisation. The overarching philosophy of the organisation is to provide kindergartens where children learn through play and are supported to reach their potential.

This review was part of a cluster of 10 kindergarten reviews in the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

The kindergarten has an inclusive curriculum that promotes positive learning outcomes for children. Literacy, mathematics and other curriculum areas are interwoven into daily learning. The environment provides many opportunities for children to be creative and use their imagination. The outside play area includes a range of equipment to provide varying levels of physical challenge. Children engage in sustained and complex learning and are supported to set their own challenges and confidently assess risk. Children with additional needs and their families are well supported. The curriculum is responsive to children’s interests, strengths and abilities.

There are strong, reciprocal relationships among children, parents and teachers. Parents and whānau feel welcome in the kindergarten and interactions are genuine and respectful. There are many opportunities for children to develop friendships. Tuakana-teina relationships support children’s learning and the development of leadership skills. Relationships foster children's sense of belonging and wellbeing.

Effective teaching interactions support children’s confidence and competence as life-long learners. Teachers are skilled at noticing children’s interests and responding to potential learning opportunities. They use a range of intentional teaching strategies that encourage children to problem solve and persevere. Children are viewed as capable and supported to develop their confidence through meaningful interactions and play.

Leadership has a strong commitment to the kindergarten philosophy. Teachers have time to reflect on their practice and contribute to centre-wide review. Internal evaluation processes need to be further developed to better understand how actions support improved outcomes for children. Leaders and teachers are committed to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and aspects of the programme reflect a bicultural approach. This could be strengthened further by increasing the confidence of teachers to use te reo Māori in their interactions.

Governance and management have comprehensive, well-established systems and practices to enable the organisation to monitor, evaluate and plan for improvement for its early learning centres. Clear guidelines and expectations for centre practice and curriculum are strongly fostered by the leadership team and trust. The vision and values support positive outcomes for children’s learning, wellbeing and that of their whānau.

Key Next Steps

Next steps for the kindergarten are to:

  • refine internal evaluation processes to be more systematic, to analyse evidence, and to more clearly identify improved outcomes for children
  • strengthen assessment processes to include personalised planning for all children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

In order to improve practice, Central Kids Kindergarten management needs to ensure observations of teacher practice are undertaken as part of the appraisal process.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road will be in three years.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

1 February 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Morrinsville, Waikato

Ministry of Education profile number

5623

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, aged over 2 years

Service roll

45

Gender composition

Girls 24 Boys 21

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other European
Other

16
22
4
3

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

December 2018

Date of this report

1 February 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

December 2015

Education Review

August 2012

Education Review

November 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road operates under the umbrella of Central North Island Kindergarten Trust (CNIKT). The kindergarten is located in Morrinsville, and is licensed to cater for 40 children from two years to school age. At the time of this ERO review, 74 children were attending, including 12 who are identified as Māori. The kindergarten is open from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm for five days a week.

There have been changes to the operation of the kindergarten since the 2012 ERO review. At the beginning of 2015 the kindergarten changed from a sessional to an all-day programme, and introduced flexible enrolment for children from two years of age. An additional teacher was appointed to the kindergarten to cater for the additional children now attending. These changes have been made to meet the needs of families.

The kindergarten has worked to address areas for development and review identified in the previous ERO report. With the support of the professional leader appointed by CNIKT, the head teacher and staff team have developed a collegial culture and significant improvements to their self-review practices. They are also taking a more reflective and shared approach to teaching. Teachers show a strong commitment to including a focus on te ao Māori, and this is now evident in the environment, programme, and community relationships.

The kindergarten is well supported by the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust. The trust’s strategic direction sets out the service’s vision, expected educational outcomes, and values. It also defines the strategies for delivering the principles and strands of the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, and for respecting Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The trust works positively to provide equitable opportunities to families by extending its hours of opening.

Professional leaders monitor the kindergarten’s compliance with policies and procedures to ensure it meets regulation requirements and management expectations. They work alongside head teachers to support and their leadership and provide guidance, and to mentor teachers as part of the appraisal process. Kindergarten teachers have generous opportunities to attend professional development opportunities to grow their teaching and leadership skills.

The trust has undertaken a long-term review of teacher appraisal in consultation with teachers. This is enabling them to respond to the expectations of the Education Council and increase the depth of teachers’ reflections about their practice. The trust has also responded effectively to the Vulnerable Children’s Act, and is well-placed to complete required changes to policies and practices for the protection of children.

This review was part of a cluster of eight reviews within the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Children are learning in a positive and inviting environment where they are welcomed and included. They have warm, caring and trusting relationships with teachers and adults. Children explore the environment actively, and are encouraged to challenge themselves and take safe risks. They are provided with a rich variety of learning opportunities that enable them to explore, discover and experiment. Tuakana-teina relationships are evident, and particularly older children support younger children to participate in play.

Teachers know children well and have a good understanding of their interests and preferences. They engage with children at their level, responding to their play and developing conversations that are responsive to children’s ideas and inquiries. Teachers support children’s creativity and developing knowledge. Literacy and numeracy are included naturally as part of everyday learning. Teachers support the progress of children with diverse needs, seeking external advice and assistance as appropriate.

The curriculum is based on the early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, and increasingly reflects Māori perspectives. The kindergarten takes an active role in the Piako Cultural Festival, involving children in learning to perform waiata in a community context. Aspects of te reo and tikanga Māori are evident in the kindergarten environment. This includes a whakaaro hui, which represents the kindergarten philosophy and is appreciated by parents and children. A playhouse in the form of a wharenui is used to introduce children to Māori tikanga and protocols. Teachers are becoming increasing confident in using te reo Māori in their conversations with children. The kindergarten promotes an inclusive environment that celebrates the cultures of children from a number of ethnicities.

Parents appreciate receiving information and support as their children prepare to transition to school. Children are able to recognise future classmates from a display of former kindergarten attendees.

Planning and assessment has been an area of development. The recent introduction of weekly meetings is enabling teachers to share children’s current learning and discuss possible teaching interactions. By linking observations and assessments, teachers will be increasingly able to make ongoing growth and development visible to children and their parents through their well-presented individual learning journals.

Teachers are using a range of strategies to enhance their partnership with parents. These include newsletters, parents’ ready access to children’s learning portfolios, and online portfolios that assist parents to respond to teachers’ entries about children’s learning. Parents are welcome to spend time in the kindergarten and contribute to the programme.

The team has well-developed processes for self review. They work hard to identify areas where they can improve outcomes for children and develop their professional skills to respond to changing needs and circumstances. This has assisted them to respond successfully to recent changes to the ages of children and their hours of attendance.

The head teacher is experienced, well informed and keeps up to date with best practice in early childhood education. She has taken a key role in developing a positive team culture where there is a shared sense of responsibility within the kindergarten. The head teacher also promotes positive relationships with whānau and the community. She is well supported by a professional leader who is well placed to provide advice, support and direction.

Key Next Steps

ERO and kindergarten leaders agree that the teachers should continue to sustain and develop the current initiatives in the areas of:

  • self review, to inform and set directions for ongoing improvement
  • appraisal, to include lines of inquiry for each teacher, and a focus on demonstrating improvement in teaching practice over time
  • planning and assessment, in order to be able to illustrate and support continuity in learning and demonstrate children’s progress in a range of contexts.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rushton Road will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

22 December 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Morrinsville

Ministry of Education profile number

5623

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

74

Gender composition

Boys 38 Girls 36

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

South East Asian

Indian

Other European

12

56

4

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

22 December 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2012

 

Education Review

November 2009

 

Education Review

September 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.