Kerikeri Kindergarten

Education institution number:
5550
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
49
Telephone:
Address:

Hone Heke Road, Kerikeri

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1 Evaluation of Kerikeri Kindergarten

How well placed is Kerikeri Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Kerikeri Kindergarten is very well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kerikeri Kindergarten is governed and supported by Northland Kindergarten Association (NKA). It is one of 22 Kindergartens managed by the Association. It provides for up to 40 children aged two years and over, in an increasingly diverse community. Approximately one-third of the children are Māori. There is a smaller group of children who have Pacific heritage.

The kindergarten's philosophy emphasises the importance of strong relationships based on whanaungatanga, manaakitanga and ako. Teachers embrace te ao Māori and value partnerships with whānau, hapū and iwi. The philosophy also states that teachers foster a deep respect for the natural environment. This is particularly evident in the Ngāhere programme where older children regularly visit local native bush as part of their learning. The Kindergarten has gained a 'Silver Enviroschools' award for sustainable environmental practices.

The kindergarten has a positive ERO reporting history. Since the 2015 ERO review, a new head teacher has been appointed from within the team. A new teacher has also been appointed. The 2015 report noted many areas of effective practice that have been maintained and strengthened. Very good progress has been made to internal evaluation and systems for documenting programme planning.

This review was part of a cluster of nine kindergarten reviews in the NKA.

The Review Findings

High quality teaching practices support children to be confident, creative, self-motivated learners who are purposefully engaged in play and inquiry for learning. Children experience respectful, nurturing relationships with their teachers and each other. These relationships help to foster a strong sense of belonging and wellbeing for children, whānau and teachers.

Many children enjoy leading their learning in the thoughtfully presented, and very well resourced indoor and outdoor environments. They are encouraged to explore and take well managed risks to build their confidence and skills. Children have many meaningful opportunities to discuss their wonderings and findings with attentive teachers. Their inquiry learning experiences provide potential for discovery through teachers' skilful questioning that deepens understanding and adds complexity to play and learning.

Teachers know each child and whānau very well. They respect and use children's prior knowledge. Teachers view children as capable, competent and powerful learners. They purposefully focus their interactions with children on developing these and other qualities of lifelong learners. Teachers listen carefully and give children time to think about their responses. They deliberately foster the skills children need to engage in meaningful conversations.

Teachers have strong connections to whānau Māori and local iwi. Māori children are very well supported to achieve success as Māori within the kawa of the kindergarten. Teachers naturally incorporate tikanga and te reo Māori into the daily programme. Whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, ako and aroha form the basis of teaching practices and children's learning experiences.

Children's work is highly valued by teachers and whānau and is regularly documented and celebrated. This is clearly displayed in children's portfolios and in the environment. Teachers' ongoing collaborative team discussions help to ensure that planning involves deliberate decision making about each child's priorities for further learning.

The head teacher has made a smooth transition into her new role and has introduced a number of useful processes. The teachers' review of the philosophy created shared understandings and consolidated their ways of being with children, whānau and each other. Internal evaluation is well established and results in improvements across all aspects of kindergarten operations. Teachers could more clearly evaluate the effectiveness of their annual plans in relation to outcomes for children.

The Association provides a comprehensive policy and procedure framework that sets clear expectations and guides teachers’ practice. It has developed relevant appraisal and teacher inquiry processes that reflect the Teaching Council’s guidelines. Each kindergarten’s annual plan aligns to the Association’s strategic vision, values and goals. NKA employs a speech language therapist and seconds a social worker from Family Works to provide targeted support for children, whānau and teachers.

Professional practice managers (PPM) regularly visit kindergartens to provide leadership and curriculum guidance for teachers. A Pou Whakarewa Tikanga Māori Advisor works closely with teachers to increase their understanding of and focus on authentically threading te ao Māori into learning programmes. There is an organisation-wide emphasis on providing high quality resources and equipment for children. Leaders and teachers value and respect the thoughtful use of natural resources.

Key Next Steps

Leaders and teachers agree that the key next steps include:

  • continuing to refine and deepen the design-for-learning process to make learning and teaching more visible

  • further strengthening the evaluative aspects of internal evaluation and annual planning to measure the impact of changes on outcomes for children.

Key next steps for Association-wide development include:

  • further developing assessment, planning and evaluation processes

  • deepening understanding of evaluative thinking and internal evaluation processes to measure the effectiveness of systems and practices across the Association.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kerikeri Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services Northern

Northern Region

15 August 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Kerikeri, Northland

Ministry of Education profile number

5550

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children aged over 2 years

Service roll

50

Gender composition

Boys 26 Girls 24

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
other European
other ethnic groups

16
21
5
8

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2019

Date of this report

15 August 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2015

Education Review

May 2012

Education Review

January 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Kerikeri Kindergarten

How well placed is Kerikeri Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kerikeri Kindergarten operates within the Northland Kindergarten Association (NKA). It provides all day education for children over the age of two years, in a warm, welcoming and settled environment.

Children have many opportunities to contribute to decisions, manage routines and initiate play. They have a strong sense of belonging and ownership of the centre. Respectful interactions are evident amongst children and adults.

The experienced, mostly long serving teachers are a cohesive team. They maintain close relationships and effective communication with families. Parent feedback affirms the centre’s valuing of family and cultures, and the care and education provided for their children.

As the kindergarten has increasing numbers of children who are two years of age, the NKA plans to provide staff with professional development focused on catering for younger children in a mixed age setting.

The kindergarten has a positive ERO reporting history. Staff have responded well to recommendations from the 2012 ERO review.

The Review Findings

Kerikeri Kindergarten’s philosophy and programmes follow the Reggio Emilia approach to learning by responding to and provoking children’s participation and extending their learning. Teachers interweave this approach with Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, to develop high quality learning programmes.

Teachers use their in-depth knowledge of children to plan learning programmes. They include early literacy and numeracy learning in meaningful ways. The curriculum has a strong focus on sustainability and community impact, through the Enviro Education programme. High quality documentation of children’s learning is used to ensure programmes reflect and extend children’s individual needs and strengths. Teachers are continuing to trial innovative approaches to assessment and planning.

High quality teaching practices are evident. Teachers use good questioning to encourage higher order thinking and encourage complex play. They offer children frequent opportunities for problem solving and creative play. Sustained conversations enrich children’s vocabulary and general knowledge.

Children are supported to be articulate, capable and confident learners. They show high levels of engagement in both independent and collaborative play. They interact very effectively with adults and initiate conversations about their own learning. They engage with other children and support each other well in tuakana/teina relationships.

The attractive learning environment is well resourced, with largely natural materials that children can use in a variety of ways. The outdoor environment offers many opportunities for children to extend their physical skills.

Parents have opportunities to share their aspirations for their children and to contribute to planning decisions. They are well informed about their children’s learning and development. Teachers support children and their parents as children transition to school.

Teachers honour the cultural uniqueness that Māori and other children bring with them. They make good use of community resources and networks to promote te reo me ngā tikanga Māori in the kindergarten. Teachers are participating in the Pumanawatanga initiative to develop further understanding of the identity, language and culture of Māori children and their whānau.

The head teacher provides strong leadership. Staff work collaboratively in a culture of continuous improvement where they question, trial and innovate. A good appraisal model is being developed to encourage more formalised teacher reflection. Professional learning and development is purposeful and well considered.

The kindergarten’s long-term and annual plans align with NKA frameworks. Kindergarten staff have a clear vision and direction that is informed by their philosophy. Teachers make good use of self review and input from staff and parents to inform the kindergarten’s decision-making.

The NKA provides good systems and support for kindergarten administration and operation. A regularly reviewed and up-dated policy framework guides centre operations. The NKA offers teachers opportunities to contribute to, and have leadership in, the association and in other educational forums.

Key Next Steps

ERO and kindergarten staff agree that key next steps to extend current good practice could include:

  • continuing to review and redesign systems for documenting programme planning
  • further developing the evaluative nature of self review processes.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kerikeri Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they select ‘have’ or ‘have not’ taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Kerikeri Kindergarten will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Northern

19 June 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Kerikeri

Ministry of Education profile number

5550

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children over the age of 2

Service roll

52

Gender composition

Boys 30

Girls 22

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

British

Tongan

other

15

30

3

1

3

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

n/a

 
 

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

19 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2012

 

Education Review

January 2009

 

Education Review

February 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years

Well placed – The next ERO review in three years

Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years

Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.