Childspace Early Learning Centre -Wilton

Education institution number:
55348
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
36
Telephone:
Address:

213 Wilton Road, Wilton, Wellington

View on map

Childspace Early Learning Centre -Wilton

1 ERO’s Judgements

Akarangi | Quality Evaluation evaluates the extent to which this early childhood service has the learning and organisational conditions to support equitable and excellent outcomes for all learners. Te Ara Poutama Indicators of quality for early childhood education: what matters most are the basis for making judgements about the effectiveness of the service in achieving equity and excellence for all learners. Judgements are made in relation to the Outcomes Indicators, Learning and Organisational Conditions. The Evaluation Judgement Rubric derived from the indicators, is used to inform ERO’s judgements about this service’s performance in promoting equity and excellence.

ERO’s judgements for Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton are as follows:

Outcome Indicators

(What the service knows about outcomes for learners)

Whakaū Embedding

Ngā Akatoro Domains

 

Learning Conditions
Organisational Conditions

Whakaū Embedding

Whakaū Embedding

2 Context of the Service

Childspace Early learning Centre – Wilton is one of four privately owned early childhood centres with shared governance.  Many toddlers transition from Childspace Karori to this service. The service roll is culturally diverse and includes a small number of Māori tamariki. Progress towards the key next steps identified in ERO’s 2018 report is ongoing. This evaluation was one of a cluster of four reviews of the Childspace Early Learning Centres.

3 Summary of findings

Tamariki benefit from a rich curriculum and thoughtfully resourced environment that reflect the service’s philosophy and priorities for learning. This includes a strong focus on exploring nature within the local community. Kaiako develop responsive, positive relationships with tamariki and whānau. They intentionally empower tamariki to independently make choices, be curious, lead their own learning and develop their learning in more complex ways, including opportunities for mathematical, science and literacy learning.

Kaiako provide a range of opportunities to support tamariki understandings of the dual heritages of Aotearoa /New Zealand. Aspects of tikanga Māori and te reo Māori are visible in the teaching and learning environment. Some progress has been made in relation to developing targeted strategies for Māori learners to experience success as Māori. Deepening understanding across the organisation about Māori success as Māori is ongoing. 

Recent improvements have been made to assessment practices that make tamariki languages, cultures and identities more consistently visible and these are ongoing. Assessment documentation makes links to the learning outcomes in Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. Tamariki learning over time in relation to the outcomes is increasingly evident. Whānau aspirations and regular home and centre communications inform assessment, planning and evaluation of the curriculum.

Leaders implement effective systems for monitoring and reporting how well the service is meeting regulatory requirements. A useful internal evaluation process is in place. It informs decision making about curriculum design and results in ongoing improvement to aspects of practice.

Governance and management leaders are improvement focused. They evaluate aspects of the strategic goals and vision for the service however could more clearly show the impact on outcomes for tamariki. They provide a high level of guidance and support for leaders and kaiako including ongoing support for new staff and leaders and regular opportunities for ongoing study and professional learning and development.  

4 Improvement actions

Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton will include the following actions in its Quality Improvement Planning:

  • continue to build kaiako capability to increase the opportunities for tamariki to hear and use te reo Māori 

  • respond consistently to the languages, cultures, and identities of all learners in curriculum planning and assessment information

  • governance and management to continue to use review and internal evaluation to scrutinise all aspects of operation and more clearly show the impact on outcomes for learners.  

5 Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton completed an ERO Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; safety checking; teacher registration; ratios)

  • relevant evacuation procedures and practices.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Dr Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services (Southern)
Southern Region | Te Tai Tini

23 December 2022 

6 About the Early Childhood Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton

Profile Number

55348

Location

Wellington

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

34 children, including 0 aged under 2

Percentage of qualified teachers

80-99%

Service roll

40

Review team on site

9 August 2022

Date of this report

23 December 2022

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, April 2018; Education Review February 2014

Childspace Early Learning Centre -Wilton - 30/04/2018

1 Evaluation of Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton

How well placed is Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton is an all-day education and care service, licensed for 34 children aged over two years. Many children transition to the centre from Childspace Karori which caters to infants and toddlers. The two centres having a strong relationship.

The service is one of four in the area that are governed by a board of directors with considerable knowledge and expertise in early childhood education and environment design.

Staff (kaiako), resources and learning spaces are divided into two age-related groups. The groups regularly spend time together. A centre manager oversees the curriculum, kaiako and day-to-day operation. The governance group employs a principal to offer further professional and operational support. They also provide professional development and resources to others in the early childhood sector. A kai creator is employed to provide nutritious meals for the children. Childspace is committed to gender balance in its staffing, and employs a number of male kaiako.

The philosophy emphasises the values of empathy, wonder, creativity, respect, love and gentleness. Kaiako focus on resourcing the environment, with particular attention paid to natural materials, rituals and real-life experiences.

Next steps identified in the service’s February 2014 ERO report have been progressed. This includes transition to school processes and provision for Pacific learners. However, cultural responsiveness to Māori learners and internal evaluation remain areas requiring development.

This review was one of a cluster of four reviews of the Childspace Early Learning Centres.

The Review Findings

Children benefit from warm and respectful interactions. Kaiako work alongside children at their level, and support them to be self-managing. Children freely access a good range of learning materials linked to their own interests, for the majority of the day.

Group projects and investigations support children’s interests as well as offering valuable new experiences. A strength of the programme is its emphasis on sustainability and the natural world. Kaiako skilfully use the learning environment. Spaces and resources are thoughtfully arranged to offer children opportunities for inspiration, exploration, contemplation, challenge and discovery. Children have many opportunities to engage in tuakana-teina interactions with their older and younger peers.

Kaiako liaise with parents and outside agencies, as appropriate, to support the learning and wellbeing of children with diverse learning needs.

Positive relationships with parents are prioritised. Kaiako provide a range of opportunities for families to engage in their child’s learning programme, including regular workshops and parent-teacher discussion evenings where families' aspirations are shared.

As a next step, kaiako should clearly demonstrate in documentation how they have drawn on their close relationships with families to enrich their planning and assessment documentation. This would mean stronger acknowledgement of parent aspirations as well as children’s culture, language and identity.

Kaiako are sensitive observers. They document useful information about children’s individual interests, skills and development, as well as their engagement in the rich group curriculum. An online assessment tool is used to invite parent comments and strengthen connections between home and centre. Documentation shows clear links to Te Whāriki 2017, the early childhood education curriculum. Portfolios show that kaiako know children well. They thoughtfully relate observations to a range of theoretical lenses. Children demonstrate ownership of their portfolios and speak proudly about special moments.

However, the impact of targeted teaching on individual children’s learning outcomes is not clear in documentation. Assessment and planning requires strengthening, to better show and build children’s identities as successful, continual learners.

Transitions into, through and out of the centre are very well considered. Management provides an additional kaiako across the Childspace services to assist during transition periods. Strong rituals and useful portfolio stories support children's sense of belonging when transitioning. Kaiako have built positive relationships with local schools and support children's sense of familiarity with school environments.

Kaiako have been building their knowledge of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. They demonstrate authenticity in their commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The programme affirms all children’s identities as bicultural citizens of Aotearoa. Leaders agree that their next step is to explore and implement specific strategies for promoting the educational success of Māori learners. This is indicated in future plans.

Teaching teams collaborate on useful investigations to inform change and improve the programme. They consult with relevant stakeholders and research. A next step is to build review practices which are strongly evaluative. Leaders should support kaiako to use systematic, robust evidence-gathering to inform refinement of practices. Internal evaluations should clearly measure and monitor the impact of practices against intended outcomes for children.

Systematic processes for biannual appraisal are in place. Kaiako are highly reflective. Observations of teaching practice are part of this process. To support an improved approach these observations and other evidence should consistently inform more robust feedback and feed forward, strongly focused on children’s learning outcomes and alignment with centre goals.

Strategic planning identifies useful goals that are likely to positively affect children’s outcomes. To strengthen long-term planning, clear indicators of success should be developed, linked to each goal, to enable ongoing measurement of progress and inform actions. Since the onsite stage of ERO's evaluation, clear indicators of success have been developed that should support an improved process.

Childspace kaiako are well supported by management. A range of useful documents and resources are in place to support shared understandings. The Institute offers many opportunities for kaiako to network and take on leadership roles, in the centre as well as in the wider sector. Leaders purposefully and consistently promote team cohesion and a positive culture.

Key Next Steps

The intended goals, strategies and outcomes identified in the revised and updated 2018-2023 Childspace Strategic Plan outline the service's intended next steps in relation to the need to strengthen:

  • the focus on measurement and monitoring of the impact of practices on children's outcomes through internal evaluation processes

  • individualised assessment and planning processes, particularly in relation to building children's identities as ongoing learners, and responding to children's cultural contexts

  • all teachers' understanding and implementation of targeted strategies for the promotion of educational success for Māori learners.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

To improve practice, management should strengthen its monitoring of quality assurance processes to ensure the service consistently meets the requirements of Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008 and the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015.Since the onsite phase of the review management has taken steps to address this.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton will be in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū- Central Region

30 April 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

55348

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

24 children, aged over 2

Service roll

42

Gender composition

Girls 25, Boys 17

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

1
35
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2017

Date of this report

30 April 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2014

Education Review

August 2010

Education Review

June 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Childspace Early Learning Centre -Wilton - 07/02/2014

1 Evaluation of Childspace Early Learning Centre-Wilton

How well placed is Childspace Early Learning Centre-Wilton to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

         Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Childspace Early Learning Centre - Wilton is one of four Childspace Early Learning Centres. It caters for children over two and most transition from Childspace Karori. The director, together with the principal and centre manager, oversees the management and operation in the centre. They employ a cook who makes nutritious meals for the children.

The centre is designed to support the developmental stages of children using two different spaces. The Nga Puti Puti room is for children from two to three years of age and the Poutama room for three to five year olds. Children transition flexibly between these spaces.

Since the August 2010 ERO report, items identified as requiring development have been addressed. The outdoor environment has seen many developments aligning with the centre's sustainability focus.

This service is governed by the Childspace Institute (the Institute). This organisation offers the wider early childhood sector professional development, resources and equipment. The centre is serviced by the Childspace Workshop. It has a high commitment to maintaining 80% to 100% of qualified teachers and ongoing teacher education and professional development.

This review was part of a cluster of four reviews of Childspace Early Learning Centres under the Childspace Institute.

The Review Findings

The centre philosophy is clearly evident in practice. It is based on respect, creativity, gentleness, love, empathy and wonder. Teachers recognise and value the importance of learning through play.  The daily programme provides a mixture of free play and more formal learning times. Transitions within the programme are well managed and purposeful. Children access a range of resources to extend their learning. Resources, activities and the environment promote exploration and foster children's imagination, peer relationships, creativity and movement. Children show a sense of security in a homely and inviting environment.

Responsive, positive, friendly, warm and respectful relationships are formed with parents and children, supporting their sense of belonging. Children's independence and self-help skills are nurtured and fostered. Teachers provide feedback to children that acknowledges and celebrates their successes.

Teachers use a range of strategies to support children’s social skills. They are responsive to their verbal and non-verbal cues and sensitive to their feelings. Teachers value the importance of relationships and a tuakana teina model is used well to promote peer learning. Children’s choices about individual and group activities are respected. They engage in play for sustained periods of time.

The planning framework has been strengthened as a result of an institute-wide review. Children's emerging interests and ideas underpin programme planning. The two spaces have been recently
redeveloped to reflect the needs of age groups. Environments are engaging, challenging and interest based. Key teacher roles, that foster learning, are well established. Opportunities for problem solving, curiosity and imagination feature highly in programme implementation. Regular excursions broaden children's knowledge of the wider community. Children and parents contribute to the curriculum.

Attractively presented portfolios provide a good record of children's learning over time. There are frequent links between stories. Teachers effectively recognise each child’s learning and identify next steps. Increasing use of children's views and ideas is evident. The 'journeys of discovery' records show the deepening complexity of children's learning.

Existing practices for seeking parents' aspirations include daily conversations, bi-annual formal meetings, parent education workshops, ongoing questionnaires and an online assessment tool. Strengthening parent contribution is an area identified for ongoing review and reflection. ERO affirms this focus.

Teachers, in partnership with parents, have created useful individual development plans for children with specific learning needs. They actively consult with external agencies and work with families to support and celebrate children's learning.

An effective bicultural programme is in place. Aspects of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are valued and integrated throughout the programme, including celebration of many cultural occasions. Teachers recognise that they would like to strengthen their shared understanding of what success for Māori children as Māori means. A strategic goal for 2013 is to extend their knowledge of provision for Māori and Pacific children.

The 'Kotiri Hui' for children aged over four assists teachers to seek the interests and views of this group and promote independence. Hui sessions provide opportunity to follow the interests and views of the group in more depth, and support the acquisition of skills and knowledge of literacy, numeracy, arts and science. Transition to school has been identified as an area for review. ERO’s evaluation confirms the need to strengthen the process.

Centre self-review processes are well developed and focused on quality improvement. Reviews provide opportunities for teachers to reflect on what they are doing. As a result, what is offered to children and families is improved and extended. Teachers are now ready to shift the focus of reviews from what they are doing, to how well they are doing it. This shift would strengthen their reviews and better align with the intent of the Institute's process.

The principal, based at the Institute, is involved with the aspirations, learning programmes and developments within the centre and provides ongoing support to the teaching team. Leadership is a strength and well promoted. The appraisal system provides a clear process for staff. This is currently under review. There is a good quality of feedback from appraisers to promote growth in professional practices.

The Institute provides a high level of guidance and support for teachers for the continuous improvement of teaching and learning. This includes:

  • robust policies and procedures developed in consultation with teachers and parents
  • well-considered assessment and planning frameworks
  • clear processes and expectations for continuous review
  • professional learning and leadership opportunities for staff.

Centre management plans clearly link to the Institute’s strategic plan. There is a focus on improvement through reflection, review and professional development. Many opportunities for teachers to further their education are provided.

Key Next Steps

Centre leaders and the principal have outlined in an action plan the priority areas for further development. These are to:

  • extend the transition-to-school process, with a focus on strengthening relationships with schools
  • strengthen shared understandings with Māori whānau about success for Māori children as Māori, so teachers can measure the effectiveness of their practice
  • shift the focus of self review from what teachers are doing, to how well they are doing it
  • review provisions for Pacific children.

ERO's evaluation affirms these priorities to further enhance teaching practice and outcomes for children and whānau.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Childspace Early Learning Centre-Wilton completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist.  In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. 

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Childspace Early Learning Centre-Wilton will be in four years. 

Joyce Gebbie
National Manager Review Services
Central Region (Acting)

7 February 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

55348

Licence type

Education and Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

34 children aged over 2 years

Service roll

42

Gender composition

Girls 21, Boys 21

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Pacific
Other ethnic groups

  3
30
  3
  6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

N/A

Choose an item.

Over 2

1 : 6

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2013

Date of this report

7 February 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

August 2010

Education Review

June 2007

Education Review

February 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.