Tamatea Playcentre

Education institution number:
55059
Service type:
Playcentre
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
16
Telephone:
Address:

23 Ranfurly Street, Tamatea, Napier

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1 Evaluation of Tamatea Playcentre

How well placed is Tamatea Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Tamatea Playcentre is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Tamatea Playcentre is in Napier and operates under the umbrella of Playcentre Aotearoa. The service is licensed to provide mixed-age sessional education and care for 25 children, two days a week. This includes 15 children up to the age of two.

Since the November 2016 ERO report, the New Zealand Playcentre Federation has restructured by amalgamating all associations to form Playcentre Aotearoa. Tamatea Playcentre is part of the Lower North Island regional hub, supported by a regional manager and support persons.

Centre support workers and centre administrators employed by Playcentre Aotearoa regularly visit playcentres. Their role is to provide professional advice and feedback to strengthen practice and promote improvement. Responsibility for day-to-day operation is undertaken by centre-elected office holders. Centre members share the duties associated with implementing the programme.

The previous ERO report for Tamatea Playcentre identified that the following areas required development:

  • assessment knowledge and practice

  • curriculum and resources to respond to infants' and toddlers' needs

  • increasing parents' conversations and questioning during play to prompt children's exploration of their interests.

Centre members have made progress in responding to these areas.

This review was part of a cluster of nine reviews in Playcentre Aotearoa, Lower North Island.

The Review Findings

The Playcentre Aotearoa philosophy of 'whānau tupu ngātahi – families growing together' guides centre practices. Centre members acknowledge that it is timely to review the service's philosophy to develop shared understanding, specific to Tamatea Playcentre, as many families are new to the playcentre.

Children experience positive, warm and respectful interactions with adults. They enthusiastically engage in an environment that is well resourced to meet their individual interests and learning needs. These include early literacy, mathematics and science experiences and opportunities to engage with the wider community. Children and their families are encouraged to share their first languages and cultures. Infants and toddlers are provided with developmentally appropriate resources that support their participation and learning.

Centre members have refined and developed assessment and planning processes to better support their responses to children’s interests. These include wall displays that show children’s current interests and ways adults can provide resources and activities to promote these. Further development should include a stronger emphasis on identifying and responding to children’s learning.

Some te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are incorporated into daily practices. Centre members have identified that further support is required to build adults' confidence and use of te reo Māori to support children's learning.

Experienced centre members are modelling language interactions during play that contribute to extending children's learning. Parents provide collaborative leadership and value the skills and knowledge of each other. Office holders have recently implemented a session coordination role that supports all members to increase their contribution and share responsibilities. The growing participation in the adult education programme impacts positively on the quality of the sessions.

There is a deliberate commitment to improving internal evaluation. Centre members' recent involvement in professional learning, related to effective internal evaluation processes, is helping them to grow their understanding. Planned and spontaneous reviews are used to reflect on aspects of practice.

Annual planning is not yet guiding centre operation. Centre members require further support to develop, implement and monitor an annual plan. Assistance for centre members is also required to consistently implement Playcentre Aotearoa procedures that ensure ongoing regulatory compliance.

Playcentre Aotearoa are reviewing their strategic plan. The 2014 to 2019 plan identifies useful priorities and goals towards achieving the Playcentre vision. Further consideration by centre members is needed to develop useful objectives and success criteria for Tamatea Playcentre that will align to the service's annual plan. Playcentre Aotearoa and members should continue to use internal evaluation to identify how well their practices improve outcomes for children.

The centre support worker provides written reports that generally affirm environmental developments and programme practices. These records are beginning to focus on outcomes for children and next steps for centre members to improve teaching and learning. Reports should focus on providing centre members with evaluative feedback that assists them to sustain and further enhance the good practice.

Appraisal for the centre support workers, centre administrators and session facilitators requires improving. Further attention should be given to developing deliberate strategies for working towards educators' inquiry goals and making links to relevant professional learning and development. Supporting staff to strengthen their knowledge of high-quality practice should be a key next step.

Key Next Steps

Playcentre Aotearoa should further support centre members to:

  • develop an annual plan to guide centre operation

  • align the centre's annual plan and objectives with the Playcentre Aotearoa strategic plan to strengthen internal evaluation and improve outcomes for children

  • improve understanding of the legislative and regulatory requirements of a licensed early learning service

  • embed assessment, planning and evaluation practices to guide future teaching and learning.

Playcentre Aotearoa should:

  • improve appraisal processes for the centre support workers, centre administrators and session facilitators to enhance their professional growth

  • continue to support leaders to build centre members' understanding of effective internal evaluation through ongoing mentoring that helps them to measure the impact of practices on children’s learning.

ERO's evaluation shows that increased oversight and guidance from the organisation is needed to progress the playcentres' areas for development and to better meet legislative requirements.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Tamatea Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Actions for compliance

To meet requirements the service needs to improve its performance in the following areas:

  • develop an annual plan that guides the service's operation.
    [Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, GMA8]

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

13 September 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Napier

Ministry of Education profile number

55059

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

25 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

23

Gender composition

Male 13, Female 10

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

7
14
2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

0-49%

Reported ratios of adults to children

Under 2

1:2

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2019

Date of this report

13 September 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

March 2016

Education Review

January 2014

Education Review

December 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Tamatea Playcentre

How well placed is Tamatea Playcentre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Tamatea Playcentre is one of ten early childhood centres administered by the Hawkes Bay Playcentre Association, (the association) which oversees governance operations. A board of governors provides guidance and support for members.

The playcentre is located in the Napier suburb of Tamatea. It offers group supervised sessions one morning per week for a maximum of 25 children, including up to 15 children up to two years of age. Of the 13 children enrolled, three identify as Māori. Parents cooperatively provide the programme and are assisted by an employed centre support person.

The January 2014 ERO report identified that significant improvement was needed in: assessment, planning and evaluation, the bicultural curriculum, self-review, supervision of children, enacting of health and safety procedures and staff appraisal. Key next steps identified for the association focused on ensuring the centre was effectively governed and managed.

Playcentre members and the board of governors at the association received targeted support through a Ministry of Education funded programme, Strengthening Early Learning Opportunities (SELO). The association has also provided ongoing support and professional development related to the key next steps.

The Review Findings

Playcentre members have made good progress in addressing and improving the key areas identified in the previous ERO report. They have participated in ongoing professional learning to build their understanding of assessment, planning and evaluation, the bicultural curriculum, self-review and staff appraisal.

Children and their parents have a positive sense of belonging with the centre. Children are supported and closely supervised during sustained, self-initiated, interest-centred play. Infants and toddlers play with their siblings and other children. Older children learn to take on leadership roles. A large area inside has been set aside for younger children's play. This is a focal point for modelling practices and parents sharing their children’s learning and development.

The curriculum is based on children’s individual and group learning. It is highly visible in the centre and accessible for children to revisit experiences and develop ideas for play. Excursions into the community are used as an extension to the learning programme. Members are committed to providing a bicultural curriculum. Some practices and learning stories reflect aspects of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori in the centre. Some whānau have shared their knowledge in the programme.

Routines are well-established. Meal times are a family-like occasion with children and parents saying karakia, and sharing food and conversations. Parents effectively support children’s wellbeing and social competence. The centre environment is often reorganised so the needs of all children can be met.

Playcentre members have increased their understanding of planning and assessment. Planning is collaboratively discussed and shared amongst parents. It is based on children’s interests and parents’ aspirations for their children’s education and wellbeing. Some parents make links with their children’s emerging learning. Evaluations of the programme inform further development of the curriculum.

Portfolios are a good record of children’s interests, learning and skill development. Learning stories reflect the children’s perspectives and at times include their voice. Some parents are starting to make links with what they observe in their child’s play and the strands of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

Useful and considered self-review and evaluation are used to make improvements. Children are central to this process when parents reflect on the outcomes that have occurred for them.

Parents welcome each other and ensure new families are supported during their transitions into the centre. Partnerships amongst families is valued. Marketing and promotion work, by office holders, has increased numbers attending the centre.

There has been good progress in establishing a committee to guide playcentre operations. A significant number of new parents are participating in playcentre training courses to increase their understanding of the curriculum, assessment and planning. This should contribute to building knowledge and expertise across the centre.

Clear operational policies and procedures are in place to guide practices specific to Tamatea Playcentre. Suitable health and safety policies and practices are evident. The centre committee has developed a new approach to the handover of office holder responsibilities. This is to ensure sustainability of systems and knowledge at the centre.

The centre support person is appraised each year based on a job description and identified goals. This role includes working with parents to develop their knowledge and practices related to their child’s education and care at the playcentre.

Improved association support has helped to embed appropriate and systematic practices for each session. This should contribute to improved sustainability of the playcentre.

Key Next Steps

Parents, with support from the association need to address and continue to improve practices related to:

  • increasing parents’ conversations and questioning during play to prompt children’s exploration of their interests
  • development of the curriculum and resources to respond to infants and toddlers specific needs
  • assessment knowledge and practice.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Tamatea Playcentre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Tamatea Playcentre will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

17 March 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tamatea, Napier

Ministry of Education profile number

55059

Licence type

Playcentre

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

25 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

13

Gender composition

Girls 7, Boys 6

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

3

9

1

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:1

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

December 2015

Date of this report

17 March 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

January 2014

 

Education Review

December 2009

 

Education Review

March 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.