Cornerstone Pre-School

Education institution number:
55012
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
32
Telephone:
Address:

1 Ida Road, Kaiti, Gisborne

View on map

Cornerstone Pre-School

1 ERO’s Judgements

Akarangi | Quality Evaluation evaluates the extent to which this early childhood service has the learning and organisational conditions to support equitable and excellent outcomes for all learners. Te Ara Poutama Indicators of quality for early childhood education: what matters most are the basis for making judgements about the effectiveness of the service in achieving equity and excellence for all learners. Judgements are made in relation to the Outcomes Indicators, Learning and Organisational Conditions. The Evaluation Judgement Rubric derived from the indicators, is used to inform ERO’s judgements about this service’s performance in promoting equity and excellence.

ERO’s judgements for Cornerstone Pre-School are as follows:

Outcome Indicators

(What the service knows about outcomes for learners)

Whakaū Embedding

Ngā Akatoro Domains

 

Learning Conditions
Organisational Conditions

Whakaū Embedding

Whakaū Embedding

2 Context of the Service

Cornerstone Pre-School is governed by the Kingdom Kids Education Trust. The centre manager oversees strategic operations. She works closely with the head teacher who has responsibility for curriculum delivery and supporting teacher practice. The programme is based on Christian values and Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum.

3 Summary of findings

Children’s sense of security and wellbeing as confident, capable learners are foundations for learning. Strong, respectful, reciprocal relationships and partnerships with whānau, parents, children and the wider community promote a sense of belonging. Leaders and kaiako collaborate to develop and progress the service’s philosophy, vision, values and priorities. Children are empowered learners.

A well-resourced environment is set up purposefully to encourage children’s exploration and inquiry. Kaiako work effectively alongside children to progress their ideas and thinking, and respond to their individual needs and interests.

Children’s learning is effectively supported through the intentional and culturally responsive curriculum. Their learning experiences include te reo me ngā tikanga Māori within an inclusive environment. Kaiako draw on a range of resources to inform planning for children that acknowledges Māori and Pacific cultures, languages and identities. Children experience equitable opportunities that enhance their learning.

Learning assessment stories effectively acknowledge children’s challenges and successes. Kaiako focus their planning from Te Whāriki and whānau aspirations to inform learning goals for individual children. Through these goals and use of the learning outcomes, they recognise children’s efforts and make their learning visible over time. Assessment practices enhance children’s mana and their learner identities.

Leaders are embedding learning conditions that enable collaboration for improvement. Ongoing professional development provides opportunities to build teacher capability. A shared leadership approach allows teachers to use each other’s strengths to develop practice.

Effective systems, processes and internal evaluation are positively impacting on children’s learning. Leaders are continuing to grow consistency of kaiako practice and implementation of professional growth cycles.

4 Improvement actions

Cornerstone Pre-School will include the following actions in its Quality Improvement Planning:

  • continue to strengthen internal evaluation to evaluate the impact of improvement actions on learning outcomes for tamariki

  • embed the professional growth cycle to support consistency of kaiako practice.

5 Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cornerstone Pre-School completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; safety checking; teacher registration; ratios)

  • relevant evacuation procedures and practices.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

28 July 2022 

6 About the Early Childhood Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Cornerstone Pre-School

Profile Number

55012

Location

Kaiti, Gisborne

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

30 children aged over 2

Percentage of qualified teachers

80-99%

Service roll

29

Ethnic composition

Māori 24, Pacific 5

Review team on site

May 2022

Date of this report

28 July 2022

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, September 2018; Education Review, September 2015

Cornerstone Pre-School - 03/09/2018

1 Evaluation of Cornerstone Pre-School

How well placed is Cornerstone Pre-School to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cornerstone Pre-School is situated in Gisborne and provides education and care for up to 30 children, aged from two to five years. Six-hour daily sessions are offered five days a week, including school term holidays.

The service is governed by the Kingdom Kids and Education Trust and is supported by a management team consisting of the service provider, centre manager, teachers and parents. A centre manager was appointed in early 2017 and oversees the strategic operation. She is supported by a supervisor, who has responsibility for the delivery of the curriculum and supporting teacher practice. There have been a number of changes to the teaching team. The programme is based on Christian values and Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. The centre philosophy prioritises kaupapa Māori values of whakawhanaungatanga, manaakitanga, mana whenua and whakamana to inform curriculum decisions. A high number of Māori children attend the pre-school.

The Review Findings

Children and whānau benefit from a warm, welcoming environment that promotes the service's philosophy. The Christian values and priorities for learning are integrated throughout the curriculum. A strong sense of whanaungatanga and manaakitanga underpins practice.

Children demonstrate a sense of security as they confidently participate in spontaneous play. They are encouraged to take on leadership roles and contribute to planned group times. Literacy and numeracy are appropriately integrated throughout the curriculum. Teachers access a range of suitable external services to support children with diverse learning needs.

A range of effective strategies support Māori children to achieve successful outcomes. In partnership with whānau, teachers provide learning experiences that are responsive to individual needs and aspirations for their children. Te ao Māori is an integral part of all children's daily experiences. Excursions into the community provide connections to, and within, the local area.

Teachers provide a culturally responsive curriculum that successfully fosters early language development. Te reo Māori, Tongan, English and sign language are effectively used to communicate with children and whānau. Pacific children's culture, language and identities are celebrated and affirmed.

Regular visits to local schools provide valuable opportunities for children to become familiar with the school environment. Parents are encouraged to be a part of the process.

Teachers know children's interests, preferences and needs well. Their participation and engagement in the programme are recorded within their learning portfolios, enabling children to share their learning with whānau. Processes are in place to support consistent assessment for learning practices. However, there is variability in the quality of these. Continuing to strengthen teachers' capability to better identify the learning that is happening, and progression over time, remains a key next step.

A strategic plan provides clear direction for governance and management to achieve its vision and goals. A regular cycle of review has resulted in positive change. A number of policies and procedures are implemented to improve the delivery of the curriculum. It is timely for management to evaluate the effectiveness of these strategies to better monitor the progress towards achieving strategic goals. This should support further decision-making and planning.

Managers and leaders continue to build their knowledge to lead effective internal evaluation and support teachers' ongoing professional growth. Leaders and teachers are reflective practitioners who work collaboratively to improve teaching practice. Leaders have identified that observations of practice are yet to be formalised within the appraisal process. Strengthening teachers' evaluative capability across all centre operation is a key next step to determine the effectiveness of actions on improving learning outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

Leaders and ERO agree, that further strengthening evaluation capability across all centre operation is required to improve in the following areas:

  • determining the effectiveness of actions on the quality of outcomes for children and progress towards achieving strategic goals

  • the consistency of assessment, planning and evaluation practices

  • further strengthen teacher inquiry into the impact of their practice on learning outcomes for children

  • formalising observations of teachers' practice in the appraisal process.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cornerstone Pre-School completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Cornerstone Pre-School will be in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Director Review & Improvement Services Central

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

3 September 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Gisborne

Ministry of Education profile number

55012

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children aged over 2

Service roll

27

Gender composition

Boys 18, Girls 9

Ethnic composition

Māori
Tongan

21
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2018

Date of this report

3 September 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2015

Education Review

November 2012

Education Review

June 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Cornerstone Pre-School - 25/09/2015

1 Evaluation of Cornerstone Pre-School

How well placed is Cornerstone Pre-School to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cornerstone Pre-School is situated in Gisborne and provides education and care for up to 30 children aged from two to five years. Six-hour daily sessions are offered five days a week.

The preschool is governed by the Kingdom Kids and Education Trust and is supported by a management team consisting of the service provider, office manager, staff and parents. It provides a programme based on Christian values and the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, with a particular focus on numeracy and literacy.

There is a commitment to building strong relationships with whānau and the community, and a culturally responsive and respectful environment of all. A high number of Māori children attend the preschool.

The teaching team is further assisted by support staff. The preschool has a positive reporting history with ERO.

The Review Findings

Children engage in a programme that has a balance of child-led and teacher-directed learning activities. Routines provide a useful structure for the day, giving children a sense of security in knowing what will happen next. They experience positive and respectful relationships with teachers.

Children’s oral language is supported through teachers' use of effective and targeted strategies. Each child’s home language is highly valued and promoted at the preschool.

A collaborative model of leadership is in place in the preschool. Teachers have a strong commitment to the vision and direction of the service. Leaders have identified that it is timely to review the preschool’s philosophy. Developing indicators of quality practice related to the philosophy statements is a next step. This should further support the effective implementation.

The spiritual and physical development of children is valued, with a particular emphasis on health and wellbeing. Excursions into the local community and visitors to the centre preschool appropriate extensions to the curriculum.

Teachers provide a responsive curriculum that supports children with additional learning needs to participate in all aspects of the programme. Appropriate relationships have been developed with external agencies.

Positive relationships formed with whānau are reciprocal and respectful, and support children’s sense of belonging. Teachers have developed an appropriate range of ways to communicate with the community.

Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are strongly promoted and well-established. Te reo Māori is heard frequently and used in conversations between teachers and children. Planned whānau events are important aspects of the preschool.

Success as Māori and Pacific children is highly promoted through well established relationships. Teachers have drawn on the strengths of the community to support their developing understanding of how to reflect and celebrate Māori and Pacific cultures in the curriculum.

Children’s portfolios provide a record of some of the learning activities each child has engaged in. Teachers should strengthen these documents to include:

  • deeper analysis that clearly identifies the learning taking place
  • challenge and complexity that better reflects the children’s progress over time.

Planning is shared with whānau. It provides a useful focus for the programme. This can be strengthened through teachers identifying specific intentional teaching strategies to support the implementation. Regular evaluation against the stated goals of the programme is a next step.

Self review requires strengthening, particularly in relation to the curriculum. Teachers and leaders should build their capacity to evaluate the effectiveness of their practice in relation to outcomes for children.

Policies and procedures are regularly reviewed. They provide a good level of guidance for staff and whānau. The management team has identified the need to formalise their strategic plan to align it to other guiding documents.

A new approach to appraisal is being developed. Once fully established this process should include:

  • clear, specific and measurable goals that are related to teaching and learning
  • developing a shared understanding of the purpose for teacher observations.

Key Next Steps

ERO identified priorities for improvement include:

  • developing indicators of quality practice related to the philosophy
  • assessment, planning and evaluation
  • self review
  • the appraisal process.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cornerstone Pre-School completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Cornerstone Pre-School will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

25 September 2015

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Gisborne

Ministry of Education profile number

55012

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, aged over two years

Service roll

41

Gender composition

Boys 23, Girls 18

Ethnic composition

Māori
Tongan

36
5

Percentage of qualified teachers

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

25 September 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

November 2012

 

Education Review

June 2009

 

Education Review

February 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.