Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc

Education institution number:
55005
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
36
Telephone:
Address:

423 Ormond Road, Mangapapa, Gisborne

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Gisborne Hospital Childcare and Education Centre Inc

ERO’s Akanuku | Assurance Review reports provide information about whether a service meets and maintains regulatory standards. Further information about Akanuku | Assurance Reviews is included at the end of this report.

ERO’s Judgement

Regulatory standards

ERO’s judgement

Curriculum

Meeting

Premises and facilities

Meeting

Health and safety

Meeting

Governance, management and administration

Meeting

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed non-compliances and is now taking reasonable steps to meet regulatory standards.

Background

Gisborne Hospital Childcare and Education Centre Inc is a community-based, non-profit service. It serves the families of Gisborne Hospital staff and the wider community. A new centre manager was appointed in December 2021 with responsibility for day-to-day operation, teaching and learning. A committee is responsible for centre governance.

Summary of Review Findings

Children learn together in a mixed-age setting. Teachers interact positively with children to enhance learning and nurture relationships. Children’s preferences are respected. They are involved in decisions about their learning experiences.

The curriculum is informed by assessment, planning and evaluation practice that demonstrates an understanding of children’s learning and interests. Strategies are in place to respect and acknowledge parent aspirations for their children. Teachers know about children’s learning and development and relevant theories and practice in early childhood education.

A philosophy statement guides the service’s operation.

Actions for Compliance

Since the onsite visit the service has provided ERO with evidence that shows it has addressed the following non-compliance.

  • equipment, premises and facilities are checked on every day of operation for hazards to children.

[Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS12]

Consideration of hazards must include but is not limited to, all areas listed in the licensing criteria (HS12).

Next ERO Review

The next ERO review is likely to be an Akarangi | Quality Evaluation.

Shelley Booysen
Acting Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui
29 March 2022 

Information About the Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Gisborne Hospital Childcare and Education Centre Inc

Profile Number

55005

Location

Gisborne

Service type

Education and care service

Number licensed for

 40 children, including up to 12 aged under 2

Percentage of qualified teachers

100%

Service roll

48

Ethnic composition

Māori 21, NZ European/Pākehā 11, Indian 9, Other ethnic groups 7

Review team on site

February 2022

Date of this report

29 March 2022

Most recent ERO report(s)

 Education Review, July 2018; Education Review, July 2015

General Information about Assurance Reviews

All services are licensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The legal requirements for early childhood services also include the Licensing Criteria for Education and Care Services 2008.

Services must meet the standards in the regulations and the requirements of the licensing criteria to gain and maintain a licence to operate.

ERO undertakes an Akanuku | Assurance Review process in any centre-based service:

  • having its first ERO review – including if it is part of a governing organisation

  • previously identified as ‘not well placed’ or ‘requiring further development’

  • that has moved from a provisional to a full licence

  • that have been re-licenced due to a change of ownership

  • where an Akanuku | Assurance Review process is determined to be appropriate.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

All early childhood services are required to promote children’s health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. Before the review, the staff and management of a service completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO assesses whether the regulated standards are being met. In particular, ERO looks at a service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher certification; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

As part of an Akanuku | Assurance Review ERO also gathers and records evidence through:

  • discussions with those involved in the service

  • consideration of relevant documentation, including the implementation of health and safety systems

  • observations of the environment/premises, curriculum implementation and teaching practice.

Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc - 16/07/2018

1 Evaluation of Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc

How well placed is Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc is a community-based, non-profit service located adjacent to the hospital. All-day education and care is provided for 40 children, including 12 children aged up to two years. The centre serves the families of Gisborne Hospital staff as well as the wider community. Approximately half of the children on the roll identify as Māori.

The centre is governed by a parent committee and an executive subcommittee of members with specific support roles. Day-to-day operation and curriculum leadership is delegated to a centre manager, who was appointed in 2016. Most teachers are fully qualified and registered. Support staff are also employed.

In 2017, the service's community identified curriculum priority statements. These emphasise relationships, challenge, confidence, responsibility and belonging.

The areas for development identified in the July 2015 ERO report have been suitably progressed. A number of changes to governance, leadership, staff and centre processes have occurred since that time. The outdoor environment has recently been redeveloped.

The Review Findings

Children and their families enjoy close relationships with teachers. Children aged up to two years benefit from warm, responsive relationships and unhurried care moments. Teachers liaise appropriately with whānau and outside agencies to support children with diverse learning needs.

Older children engage in meaningful inquiry project work, where they explore group interests through a range of media. A range of resources is available for self-directed exploration for the majority of the day. The mixed-age outdoor space offers opportunities for tuakana teina interactions.

Consultation with families informed decisions about the service's priority learning outcomes, in order to localise the delivery of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. These valued aspects are becoming embedded in documentation. The manager agrees with ERO, that creating ways to link these outcomes to teaching practices is a useful next step.

Practice relating to the care and learning of infants and toddlers is under review. The service is consulting with the community and looking at current research to develop a specific philosophy of practice for these young children. Leaders agree that this philosophy should align with the service's valued learning outcomes and defined teacher actions. Particular attention should also be paid to strategies that empower and support the social competence of very young learners.

Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are valued, and well integrated within the programme, especially through kapa haka and waiata Māori. Teachers continue to strengthen their understanding of local tikanga and kawa. Leaders and teachers have identified that strengthening their understanding of culturally responsive teaching practices, in partnership with whānau Māori, is a priority area for development.

Transitions in to and within the centre are flexible for children and their families. A continuity-of-care model, where teachers transition through the centre alongside their key children, has recently been introduced. This is likely to positively impact on children's wellbeing, in line with the service's curriculum priorities.

Well-considered strategies are in place to support children and families to confidently transition from the centre to school. Parents and whānau are given useful transition information, which reflects both Te Whāriki and The New Zealand Curriculum. Narratives that celebrate children’s unique learning dispositions are shared with school staff, further promoting a smooth transition between learning environments.

Teachers are building their capacity to assess, plan and evaluate their impact on children’s ongoing learning. Very useful frameworks and systems support this process. Regular observations and whānau aspirations form the basis of clear assessments of children’s progress. ERO and leaders agree that the next step is for teachers to show how their strong knowledge of children and whānau, including cultural contexts, informs their planning. Assessments should be used by teachers to inform specific, challenging teaching strategies that can be subsequently implemented, documented, and evaluated for their impact on children's learning.

Teachers collaborate on useful reviews of their practice, consulting with a range of stakeholders and current research to inform decisions about improvements across the curriculum. A next step for the service is to refine the evaluative aspect, by using measureable indicators to show how well current practices serve particular groups. This should help the teaching team to know how well they are achieving intended outcomes.

Teachers’ implementation of the appraisal system is variable, and requires strengthening. To meet Education Council expectations, leaders and teachers should develop:

  • clear guidelines to ensure consistency of practice
  • portfolios of evidence, sufficient to show how their practice reflects all Standards for the Teaching Profession, and how improvements to their practice have positively impacted on children's learning outcomes
  • shared accountability for the completion of an annual appraisal cycle to support the attestation of teachers' practising certificates.

The manager uses a range of positive strategies to build teacher capability and cohesion in the teaching team. Collaboration, distributed leadership and individual accountability are promoted. She supports teachers to use inquiry and research, and to explore the use of child-led teaching practices that are more clearly aligned with the service's learning priorities and the intent of Te Whāriki. ERO's evaluation affirms this direction.

The parent committee is supportive of management and teachers. Members' focus has been on establishing the financial sustainability of the service. They agree that it is timely to strengthen and extend their governance role. A stronger focus on achieving and monitoring the outcomes of the strategic plan should better equip the committee to realise the priorities and aspirations the learning community has identified.

Key Next Steps

A number of systems and processes still need to be fully implemented and embedded in practice. ERO and management agree that priorities for development are:

  • defining, using and monitoring agreed teaching strategies
  • assessment, planning and evaluation, in partnership with whānau
  • teacher appraisal.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

ERO's evaluation identified an area of non-compliance. The service provider must ensure that systems and processes are consistently implemented according to policy, particularly in relation to:

  • timely notification of the Ministry of Education when a serious injury occurs involving a child.
    [Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS34]

To improve current practice, the service provider and committee should revisit and strengthen a number of policies and procedures and monitoring systems, with particular attention paid to changes in relevant legislation.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc will be in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

16 July 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Gisborne

Ministry of Education profile number

55005

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 12 aged under 2

Service roll

49

Gender composition

Boys 32, Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

25
23
1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2018

Date of this report

16 July 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

July 2015

Education Review

August 2012

Education Review

April 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.