Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street

Education institution number:
5464
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
34
Telephone:
Address:

63 Woolley Street, Avondale, Christchurch

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1 Evaluation of Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street

How well placed is Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street is one of 69 early learning services governed and managed by Canterbury Westland Kindergarten Association Incorporated, trading as Kidsfirst Kindergartens.

The kindergarten provides for the education and care of young children from two years to school age. All teachers/kaiako are qualified and certified early childhood education teachers/kaiako. The association education manager (EM) provides consistent professional advice and guidance to support the effective operation of the service.

The kindergarten vision is to 'create an environment that supports children in their journey to become competent and confident lifelong learners.' The vision is supported by the values of Whanaungatanga, Manaakitanga, Aroha and Kaitiakitanga.

The curriculum priorities are: Manaakitanga, Social Competence, Justice and Inclusion and Kaitiakitanga.

Since ERO's February 2014 report, a new head teacher and teacher have been appointed. The team is continuing to address the next steps of the previous report. This includes strengthening aspects of planning and assessment, and internal evaluation.

This review was part of a cluster of eight kindergartens governed and managed by the Canterbury Westland Kindergarten Association.

The Review Findings

Children and whānau at Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street benefit from caring, supportive relationships with their teachers. Teachers create a welcoming environment where the kindergarten's vision of whanaungatanga is evident and children show a sense of belonging.

The head teacher and team demonstrate a strong commitment to improving their practice and together lead change to improve outcomes for children and their whānau. This is evident in the ways they:

  • provide support for parents in their role of parenting

  • have adapted and improved the programme, environment and routines to better suit the requirements of the range of children attending, including those with diverse needs

  • have strengthened Treaty-based practice with greater inclusion of te ao Māori world views

  • are more intentionally planning and providing programmes that support the kindergarten's curriculum, annual plan and internal evaluation priorities.

Children are well supported by their teachers to develop their social competence and skills of being a friend. Teachers foster children's agency by increasingly seeking and responding to their ideas about aspects of the programme. All children are developing knowledge and understanding of New Zealand's bicultural heritage. For Māori children this helps build their sense of identity as Māori.

The Canterbury Westland Kindergarten Association has a well-developed and clearly understood vision. It is underpinned by targeted strategic and annual planning systems. There are close links between the kindergarten plans, internal evaluation, appraisal and professional development. The teachers are well supported by association managers and leaders to achieve the priorities of the kindergarten and to promote high quality learning outcomes for all children.

Since the last ERO review, a restructure has enabled a key focus on education excellence within the kindergartens, and innovation and collaboration within the association and in the wider early childhood community. Key staff make a significant contribution to supporting other early learning services in Te Waipounamu/ South Island.

The association has a very strong commitment to providing high quality professional development to build on leadership capacity and teacher capability. It has high expectations for teaching and learning and equitable outcomes for all children. This includes promoting understandings of and respect for te ao Māori at all levels of the organisation. The association's internal evaluation practices are being well used to inform decision making and support the strong focus on continuous improvement.

Key Next Steps

A next step for the team, with the support of the EM, is to continue to embed the new system for planning for individual children. This includes, ensuring that goals are developed in collaboration with parents, and that assessments show progress over time and make children's cultural backgrounds visible.

Other next steps include:

  • strengthening evaluative thinking and internal-evaluation practices by ensuring the focus is on outcomes for children and that data is gathered from a wide range of sources

  • deepening learning-centred partnerships with parents by seeking their input and views more systematically in matters that concern them, such as determining curriculum priorities and valued outcomes for learning, and internal evaluation.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Dr Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services Te Tai Tini
Southern Region

5 August 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

5464

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, two years and over

Service roll

34

Gender composition

Boys 15, Girls 19

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnicities

8
22
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2019

Date of this report

5 August 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2014

Education Review

May 2010

Education Review

October 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street

How well placed is Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street is located in eastern Christchurch. The area was significantly affected by the Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011. This review was a part of a cluster of 11 kindergartens governed and managed by the Canterbury Westland Kindergarten Association Incorporated, trading as Kidsfirst Kindergartens.

For a short time after the 2011 earthquake, the kindergarten combined with another kindergarten in the area on the Woolley Street site.

Leaders and teachers have focused on providing a calm, secure and welcoming place for children and their families, as they cope with the many ongoing issues affecting them as a result of the earthquakes. Some positive steps taken by the teachers have led to significant improvements in children’s behaviours and relationships with others.

Since the May 2010 ERO review, a new acting head teacher with leadership experience began in Term 2, 2013.

The kindergarten has responded positively to the findings in the previous ERO report. Children now have more opportunities to use technologies, such as computers and iPads in their learning. Assessment and planning practices have been, and continue to be, improved to more clearly identify and respond to children’s learning.

The association responded sensitively to the circumstances of Canterbury and Westland communities by removing all fees. The association reports that as a result of this initiative, children’s attendance at kindergarten has increased, particularly in areas where there are high numbers of priority learners.

The Review Findings

This kindergarten’s vision of valuing and respecting children and helping them to become competent and confident learners is strongly evident in practice.

Positive and inclusive relationships between teachers and children support children’s wellbeing and give them confidence as learners. Children are well supported to take responsibility for their own learning and to care for others. These learning characteristics help children to make a successful transition to school.

Teachers know and understand children in the context of their families and community. They make good use of this knowledge to plan programmes to build on children’s strengths, interests and capabilities. For example, they:

  • regularly work with children to make shared decisions about the content and direction of their learning

  • make good links to relevant happenings in the community such as the ongoing construction of roadways

  • encourage children to solve problems

  • give children many opportunities to test their ideas and make discoveries.

The child-centred programme is well planned to engage children and promote their learning. Teachers make good use of the attractive, spacious and well-designed environment to:

  • provide many and varied experiences that motivate children to be creative and expressive

  • help children develop an awareness and understanding of the natural world and sustainable practices

  • integrate literacy and numeracy in meaningful ways

  • offer interesting and challenging activities to foster children’s physical development.

Children have benefited from recent changes to the organisation of meal times and group routines. They now have longer periods of uninterrupted learning time and, with careful supervision, can make their own decisions about when to eat.

Teachers keep parents well informed about children’s interests, learning and kindergarten focus areas through attractive wall displays and individual and group records.

Leaders are focused on making ongoing improvements to the quality of teaching and learning through systematic self review. Teachers are encouraged to critically reflect on their practice. Leaders are successfully bringing about change by sharing and modelling desired practices and promoting a collaborative approach to decision making.

The association provides effective governance and management for all of its kindergartens. The long-term vision and goals for all kindergartens are determined by the governing board. Each individual kindergarten establishes its own plan incorporating the board's goals. The association responded appropriately to the circumstances of Canterbury and Westland communities by removing all fees.

Each kindergarten is supported by education support managers (ESMs) who make regular visits and provides well-targeted professional development. In particular, teachers are well supported in developing their understanding of te ao Māori and making this more evident in documentation and practices. This remains an area for further development in this kindergarten.

The association has high expectations for teaching and learning. The use of recently developed indicators of good practice is helping to identify and spread effective practice. Appraisal is used effectively to recognise areas of strength and where further developments may be necessary.

Key Next Steps

The leaders and teachers have identified, and ERO agrees, that aspects of planning, assessment and self review could be further strengthened. The ongoing guidance and support of the ESM is likely to continue to have a positive effect on this development.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Kidsfirst Kindergartens Woolley Street will be in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

18 February 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

5464

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children over the age of two years

Service roll

46

Gender composition

Girls 24; Boys 22

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

4

41

1

Percentage of qualified teachers 0-49% 50-79% 80% Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

October 2013

Date of this report

18 February 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

May 2010

 

Education Review

October 2006

 

Accountability Review

February 2001

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.