Cottle Kindergarten

Education institution number:
5317
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
47
Telephone:
Address:

117 Thackerary Street, Upper Hutt CBD, Upper Hutt

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Cottle Kindergarten - 23/05/2017

1 Evaluation of Cottle Kindergarten

How well placed is Cottle Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cottle Kindergarten is located in Upper Hutt City. It operates Monday to Friday from 8:30am until 2:30pm. Daily sessional places are available for children aged two to five years.

The kindergarten philosophy emphasises the importance of creating a community of learners that values diversity and respects the environment through agreed core values that include: relationships, social competence, risk taking, sustainability and literacy and numeracy knowledge.

Cottle Kindergarten is one of 85 kindergartens and three home-based education and care networks governed and managed by He Whānau Manaaki o Tararua Free Kindergarten Association Incorporated (the association). This is a new kindergarten association created from joining the Rimutaka and Wellington Kindergarten Associations in 2014. This is the first review for this kindergarten since the merger.

The board and managers provide governance for the organisation. Senior teachers have delegated kindergartens. Their role is to provide regular support and a range of professional learning and development opportunities for teachers.

In 2012, the Wellington association developed a framework to guide the implementation of its curriculum, Te Manawa. This document outlines criteria for curriculum delivery including expectations for assessment and planning for children’s learning. Its introduction within this and other ex-Rimutaka Kindergartens occurred during 2015 with each kindergarten adapting it to respond to its community. 

The November 2013 ERO report for Cottle Kindergarten identified areas for review and development in relation to assessment practices, provision for Māori and Pacific children and self review. These areas continue to be areas of ongoing focus for improvement.

This review was part of a cluster of nine reviews in the He Whānau Manaaki o Tararua Free Kindergarten Association Incorporated. 

The Review Findings

Children experience a child-initiated, play-based curriculum. They are mostly busy, purposeful and active learners. Teachers encourage emerging interests, and support their inquiries and investigations. Children’s risk-taking within a safe environment is well supported. They make choices from the wide range of rich learning experiences.

Teachers continue to refine assessment and planning processes and increasingly make use of Te Manawa to guide their practice. They should further consider how assessment, planning and use of deliberate teaching strategies extends and challenges children’s thinking and learning.

Children develop skills that supports them to be capable and confident lifelong learners. Early literacy and numeracy experiences are meaningfully included throughout the programmes. Each child's learning and development is celebrated and shared between teachers and parents.

Teachers focus on developing strong relationships between homes and the kindergarten. Children with specific learning needs are welcomed and supported by close partnerships with whānau and external agencies. Teachers know each child and their personalities well. Parent involvement is valued. Regular communication with parents encourages increased sharing of aspirations for their child and contributes to programme decision-making.

Te ao Māori perspectives that allow children to experience te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are increasingly evident in the programme. Teachers recognise that further developing skills and strategies to successfully support Māori learners in their language, culture and identity is a next step.

Children’s sense of belonging is promoted when they start at this kindergarten. Adults support parents to settle children according to their needs. Teachers’ participation in cluster meetings with local schools and early learning centres supports establishing and building closer links with a range of schools. This involvement helps children moving to school.

The senior teacher provides termly written feedback on agreed development priorities and the quality of teaching and learning. An annual internal evaluation supports strengthening of these termly reports. There is a deliberate focus on outcomes for children and teacher/leader performance.

The head teacher provides capable professional leadership and welcomes initiative. The teaching team is collaborative. Each teacher plays an active role in the kindergarten's development. A strengthened appraisal model is being implemented across the kindergartens. This includes focused goals that build teacher and leader capability, and clearer links with the Practising Teacher Criteria.

Internal evaluation practices are becoming embedded as teachers become aware of the purpose to improve teaching and learning. There is a sound framework in place for review. Teachers have opportunities to contribute to and lead these inquiries. The senior teacher has identified key aspects of this process to continue to strengthen to improve educational outcomes for children. ERO's evaluation agrees with these findings. 

Key Next Steps

Leaders, teachers and ERO agree the following key next steps are to continue to:

  • refine and embed assessment and planning practices
  • build on practices that support a culturally responsive curriculum and Māori children's success as Māori learners
  • develop shared understanding of processes for effective internal evaluation to enhance teaching and learning.

The association should continue to support the development of formal critique of teaching practice and strengthening responsiveness to Māori children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cottle Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist.  In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. 

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Cottle Kindergarten will be in three years. 

Patricia Davey
Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

23 May 2017 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Upper Hutt

Ministry of Education profile number

5317

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children aged over 2

Service roll

48

Gender composition

Boys 25, Girls 23

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Tongan
Cook Island
Indian
Fijian Indian
Other ethnic groups

  3
29
  1
  2
  1
  3
  3
  6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

23 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

October 2013

Education Review

April 2010

Education Review

January 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service. 

Cottle Kindergarten - 31/10/2013

1 Evaluation of Cottle Kindergarten

How well placed is Cottle Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Cottle Kindergarten is located in Upper Hutt and caters for children aged from two to five years. It is an all-day service licensed for 30 children and operates sessionally five days a week. It is moving to a single session for 40 children in early September 2013. At the time of this review 51 children are enrolled.

The Rimutaka Kindergarten Association (the association) governs the kindergarten effectively, and provides senior teacher support. The association is committed to maintaining the ratio of 100% qualified teachers. Well-developed policy guidelines clearly outline association expectations for developing the programme and managing day-to-day operations.

The teaching team, comprises a head teacher and three fully qualified teachers. Two are full time and one part time. They have been together for three years.

The philosophy emphasises the importance of respectfully working in partnership with families and whānau to enhance children's learning with a focus on relationships, social competence, risk taking, technology, and literacy and numeracy knowledge.

The association coordinates the Upper Hutt Professional Learning Community (UPLC) cluster. This includes teachers from the early childhood and primary sectors meeting regularly to support positive transitions to school for children. Cottle Kindergarten is part of this cluster.

The kindergarten has a positive reporting history with ERO.

This review was part of a cluster of eleven kindergarten reviews in the Rimutaka Kindergarten Association.

The Review Findings

The core values of the kindergarten philosophy are highly evident in practice. Close relationships between teachers, children and families assist the provision of a warm and caring environment. Children are supported to manage their own behaviour. Teachers promote exploration, risk taking, active play and physical development.

The kindergarten programme is underpinned by Te Whāriki. Parent’s aspirations for their children are gathered and considered when planning for children. They notice and recognise children’s learning and interests and discuss these at the end of each session. The interests are the vehicle for providing the learning.

Through assessment and planning in portfolios, teachers clearly show children's learning. Good learning links are made over time. Teacher, child and parent input are evident. As part of an association initiative, teachers are gathering information about assessment styles. They then write alternative types of learning stories using the child as the audience. This area is developing well.

Activities affirm and build on children’s identified learning. They enhance relationships and support leadership roles.

Well-established routines give children security as they predict what is going to happen. Play is calm, purposeful and cooperative. Children enjoy positive, respectful and friendly relationships with each other. Teachers set high expectations for children and support them to take responsibility for self and group wellbeing.

A continued strength of the kindergarten is its use of information and communications technologies (ICT). Children competently use a range of ICT tools as part of their learning.

A variety of effective teaching strategies is used. As teachers play alongside children they model and enrich children’s vocabularies, make links to children's home life and past learning. They use questioning to promote thinking, foster discussions and extend play.

A strong bicultural programme has been developed and implemented. The environment reflects a focus on Māori. Teachers take time to establish open, caring and respectful relationships with whānau. Teachers listen to and interpret needs and aspirations for each child. They also ask for feedback on each child’s assessment documentation. Teachers value Māori children’s identities and see this as a key to their success as Mäori. ERO identifies that the next step is to define what success for Māori, as Māori means to the team and to whānau.

All the cultures of children enrolled are evident in the environment. Teachers weave words from countries of origin into daily practice. There is a plan to incorporate ideas from the Ministry of Education Pasifika Plan into the curriculum. ERO agrees this should assist in strengthening provisions for Pacific children.

Teachers support children’s transition to school well. Prior to transitioning, teachers speak with children and whānau and find out what will help them in the process.

The head teacher shares leadership effectively. Team members are supported to participate and grow as leaders using their personal interests and strengths. The kindergarten’s annual goals are aligned to association wide objectives. The teaching team regularly monitors progress against these.

The newly developed appraisal system is well implemented. This process affirms good practice and identifies teacher’s next steps for development. Teachers attend a range of professional development opportunities. The association senior teacher provides regular high quality reports and assists in developing leadership capacity.

Self review is a well understood process. A sound framework for self review has developed. Teachers value research as a tool and use review to improve the quality of practice and learning outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

ERO leaders and teachers agree that key next steps are to:

  • continue to investigate alternative ways to identify and document children’s learning in portfolios
  • develop specific and measurable indicators to assist self-review processes by strengthening analysis and evaluation
  • define what success for Māori as Māori means to the team and whānau
  • develop strategies to promote success for Pacific children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Cottle Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Cottle Kindergarten will be in three years.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region (Acting)

31 October 2013

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Upper Hutt

Ministry of Education profile number

5317

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children aged over 2

Service roll

51

Gender composition

Girls 28, Boys 23

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

Indian

Other ethnic groups

7

32

4

4

4

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

N/A

 
 

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2013

Date of this report

31 October 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

April 2010

 

Education Review

January 2007

 

Education Review

April 2003

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.