Harriette Vine Kindergarten

Education institution number:
5241
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
38
Telephone:
Address:

5 Watkin Street, Whanganui

View on map

1 Evaluation of Harriette Vine Kindergarten

How well placed is Harriette Vine Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Harriette Vine Kindergarten is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Harriette Vine Kindergarten is in Whanganui. Opening hours are Monday to Friday from 8:30am until 2:30pm. Full day places are available for children aged from two to six years. At the time of this ERO evaluation there are 37 children enrolled, with 13 identifying as Māori.

The philosophy statement emphasises positive relationships and personalised learning.

The October 2015 ERO report identified that self review and the promotion, use and understanding of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori required improvement. These remain areas for further development.

The Nature Discovery Programme, which has been a feature of the centre for many years, is presently on hold pending review.

Harriette Vine Kindergarten is one of 15 kindergartens governed and managed by the Whanganui Kindergarten Association Incorporated (the association). The governing board is responsible for setting the overall strategic direction for the organisation. The day-to-day running of the association is the role of the general manager, who is responsible to the board.

Since April 2018, the association's programme of professional learning and development and curriculum implementation has been managed by He Whānau Manaaki o Tararua Free Kindergarten Association Incorporated. An association senior teacher and two senior teachers from Whānau Manaaki provide regular support for teachers.

This review was part of a cluster of 15 in the Whanganui Kindergarten Association Incorporated.

The Review Findings

Children lead their own learning in an environment responsive to their group interests. Warm, reciprocal relationships foster their belonging. Children are confident, curious and play together amicably.

Teachers identify priorities for learning for children requiring additional support. Records show progress of these children over time and contribute to discussions with external agencies. However, leaders acknowledge that teachers' approach to promoting an environment that is inclusive for all children requires improvement.

Children's portfolios build a picture of their interests and engagement. Leaders are supporting teachers to strengthen their approach to on-going assessment and planning for children's learning. ERO affirms this direction that should include focus on:

  • the extent to which assessment practices are responsive to children's language, culture and identity

  • how well teachers are supporting individual children's learning

  • regular evaluation of the impact of teaching strategies.

Continuing to improve the inclusion of te ao Māori remains a key priority. Leaders recognise that teachers' bicultural practice requires strengthening. In addition, supporting teachers to develop their knowledge and understanding of promoting educational success for Māori children is an important next step.

Teachers are reflective and engage in collegial discussions to improve the programme. Strengthening understanding and use of effective internal evaluation is a priority. This should allow teachers to identify how effective their practices are in improving outcomes for children.

The governing board is future-focused and has taken appropriate steps to strengthen opportunities for teachers’ professional learning and development. An association-wide appraisal process is in place to support teacher practice in promoting positive learning outcomes for children. Consistency of its implementation across all kindergartens requires strengthening.

Key Next Steps

Association leaders and ERO agree that for ongoing and sustained improvement, staff at Harriette Vine Kindergarten should strengthen:

  • assessment, planning and evaluation processes, including responsiveness to children's cultures and languages

  • the bicultural curriculum

  • approaches to supporting success for Māori children

  • teachers' understanding and use of internal evaluation focused on outcomes for children

  • teachers' understanding and approach to promoting an inclusive environment for all children.

The senior management team of Whanganui Kindergarten Association Incorporated should continue to strengthen the implementation of teacher appraisal.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Harriette Vine Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Actions for Compliance

ERO identified areas of non-compliance in the service related to health and safety. To meet requirements the service needs to improve its performance in the following areas:

  • when children leave the premises on an excursion, the excursion must be approved by the person responsible and an appropriate assessment and management of risk undertaken

  • records of injuries, illnesses and incidents at the service include evidence that parents have been informed

  • records of medication given to children show evidence of parental acknowledgement.
    [Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS17; HS27; HS28]

In order to improve practice the association should ensure that at least one of the toilets for use by children is designed to provide them with some sense of privacy.

Since the on-site stage of the review, association leaders have provided ERO with steps taken to address these areas.

Recommendations

Leaders and teachers should evaluate the extent to which Nature Discovery planned excursions are effectively supporting children's learning and development. This evaluation should include aspects of children's health and safety and the extent to which the programme promotes inclusive opportunities for all children.

Teachers and leaders of Harriette Vine Kindergarten will develop an action plan that details how they plan to address these priorities. Progress against this plan will be monitored by ERO.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region

29 April 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

5241

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children aged over 2

Service roll

46

Gender composition

Girls 23, Boys 23

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

13
27
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

February 2019

Date of this report

29 April 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

October 2015

Education Review

September 2012

Education Review

May 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Harriette Vine Kindergarten

How well placed is Harriette Vine Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Harriette Vine Kindergarten is situated in Whanganui. It is one of 14 kindergartens administered by the Whanganui Kindergarten Association. The kindergarten is licensed for 40 children and has a roll of 39. Sessions operate from 8.30am to 2.30pm. All teachers are qualified and registered.

The governing board is responsible for setting overall strategic direction for the organisation. The day-to-day running of the association is the role of the general manager, who is responsible to the board. Two senior teachers are employed to support the learning and development of teachers. Two cultural advisors were recently appointed to support teachers to realise potential and success for Māori and Pacific children.

There has been sustained progress in relation to areas for improvement identified in the September 2012 ERO review. This has been well supported by focussed professional learning and development.

This review was part of a cluster of seven kindergarten reviews in the Whanganui Kindergarten Association.

The Review Findings

Children participate enthusiastically in a curriculum that is predominantly led by them. They are seen as competent and capable learners. Teachers assist children in their learning, follow their interests and allow them to drive their own learning. They are skilled in knowing when to involve themselves in the children’s play, when to step back and how best to extend oral language.

The kindergarten’s philosophy focuses on 'learning and exploring, meaningful experiences, strong families, community belonging, value, respect and people’. These are highly evident in inclusive and respectful practices that foster relationships with children and their families.

Teachers are responsive to the children’s needs and interests, listen carefully and have meaningful conversations. Continuity and complexity of children’s learning is well documented and clearly linked to the kindergarten priorities for learning.

Children engage in sustained play and they develop problem solving. Exploration and discovery are supported through thoughtful resourcing. Children are encouraged to take responsibility for themselves, others and the environment. The atmosphere is calm, settled and purposeful.

Children’s literacy, mathematics and science learning is appropriately promoted through play. They use digital technologies to find information and to record and share their learning and activities.

A feature of the programme is the weekly nature-discovery programme for the older children. This programme encourages and allows children to develop independence, initiative and thinking skills. Leaders and teachers are investigating how to extend this approach across the curriculum.

The 'Priorities for Children’s Learning' initiative was guided by the senior teachers in response to a recent ERO national evaluation report. This comprehensive, sound and strategic framework is used to strengthen planning, assessment and evaluation processes in each kindergarten.

Teachers discuss and analyse assessment information to understand children’s learning and interests and plan cooperatively to continue and extend these. Children have many opportunities to take the lead and be involved in decision-making.

Parents are encouraged to contribute and lead aspects of the curriculum. Leaders and teachers continue to build on existing good practice to better incorporate parent contributions and aspirations.

Te ao Māori and Pacific worlds are highly evident in the kindergarten environment, learning activities and interactions. Teachers use te reo Māori in the programme. They are committed to ongoing professional learning to further enhance their knowledge to support Māori and Pacific learners.

Transitions into the kindergarten are well considered and foster children’s sense of belonging and wellbeing. Partnerships between the centre, schools and parents promote these successful practices.

Collaboration is a feature of the kindergarten. Teachers are highly reflective practitioners who continue to seek ways of improving their practices. The head teacher is an effective leader and is supported by a cohesive teaching team. Teachers use their curriculum knowledge to strengthen children’s learning and to take on leadership roles. Individual strengths are valued and contribute to a high quality programme.

Appraisal is purposeful and improvement focused, with appropriate links to the Practising Teacher Criteria, Professional Standards and Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners. Teachers inquire into the impact of their teaching.

Teachers clearly understand the purpose and process for self review and follow a well-structured framework. They should use self review effectively to inform practice, curriculum and changes for improvement. Leaders acknowledge that the teaching team should continue to inquire into the impact of teaching on children's learning.

Key Next Steps

The senior teacher, head teacher, staff and ERO agree that the next steps are to continue to:

  • strengthen self review to include evaluating the impact and effectiveness of review findings on children’s learning and wellbeing
  • focus on providing a curriculum that supports the promotion, use and understanding of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori.

The senior management team of the Whanganui Kindergarten Association is continuing to build teachers’ capability to be more responsive to Māori and Pacific children’s culture, language and identity to enhance cultural practice. ERO affirms this direction.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Harriette Vine Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Harriette Vine Kindergarten will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Central

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Whanganui

Ministry of Education profile number

5241

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, aged over 2

Service roll

39

Gender composition

Girls 20, Boys 19

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other ethnic groups

2

35

2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

N/A

 
 

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

13 October 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

September 2012

 

Education Review

May 2008

 

Education Review

September 2003

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.