Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī

Education institution number:
5205
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
53
Telephone:
Address:

21 Frederick Street, Taupo

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1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī operates under the umbrella of Central North Island Kindergarten Trust (CNIKT). The kindergarten is licensed to cater for 40 children from two years to school age. A high proportion of children enrolled are Māori. The kindergarten is open from 8.45 am to 2.45 pm, five days a week.

The kindergarten philosophy describes the centre as a village where children experience strong family-like bonds with teachers. Children learn naturally, supported by an environment that is carefully developed to invite involvement in sustained, complex play. The dual heritage of Aotearoa is woven in the village, in partnership with whānau.

Since the 2013 ERO review, the head teacher, with the support of the teaching team and the CNKIT professional leader, has continued to develop the consistent use of high quality teaching practice. Self-review processes identified a variety of areas for development that were then included in the centre's strategic plan and addressed.

The centre is well-supported by the CNIKT. The trust’s strategic direction sets out the service’s vision, expected educational outcomes, and values. It also defines the strategies for delivering the principles and strands of the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, and for respecting Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The trust works positively to provide equitable opportunities to families by extending its hours of opening.

Compliance and regulatory requirements are well monitored by professional leaders. Policies and procedures ensure the kindergarten meets regulation requirements and management expectations. The professional leaders work alongside head teachers to support their leadership roles and provide guidance, and mentor teachers as part of the appraisal process. Kindergarten teachers have appropriate opportunities to attend professional development opportunities to grow their teaching and leadership skills.

Personnel matters are well managed. The trust has undertaken a long-term review of teacher appraisal in consultation with teachers. This is enabling them to respond to the expectations of the Education Council and increase the depth of teachers’ reflections about their practice. The trust has also responded effectively to the Vulnerable Children’s Act, and is well placed to complete required changes to policies and practices for the protection of children.

This review was part of a cluster of six reviews in the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Children are highly involved in meaningful freely chosen, self-directed play. They display creativity and persistence as they enjoy the company of others, engage in many episodes of sustained imaginative play and share books and stories. Children engage freely in both indoor and outdoor play and enjoy trusting relationships with teachers and support staff. They are skilled at using a variety of readily available construction materials, showing well-developed social skills as they negotiate with one another. Children are developing as confident, competent and responsible learners who know how to make good choices.

Teachers have positive, sensitive and supportive relationships with children. Their inclusive practice and recognition of culture and identity enables children to feel at home and participate fully in the life of the centre. Aspects of te reo and tikanga Māori are integrated in centre practice.

Teachers are highly skilled at empowering children to take responsibility for their wellbeing and learning. They support children to problem solve and experiment, and ask open questions that challenge their thinking. Teachers listen to children, explore their deep interests, and make extensive use of conversations to support children's oral language, including the use of te reo Māori. Literacy and numeracy are naturally integrated in a variety of contexts, and art, music and waiata are important features of the daily programme. Children are learning and growing in an environment that is responsive to who they are and what they bring to their learning.

The curriculum offers children a wide selection of experiences. It is based on Te Whāriki, early childhood curriculum, and strongly supports the centre's philosophy that children's play should be highly regarded, uninterrupted and unhurried. The environment is carefully prepared to be safe for children, and to encourage children's critical thought, wonderings and creativity. Teachers get to know children well, discuss their ongoing development at staff meetings and develop strong, positive partnerships with parents. Children with additional learning needs are well supported and fully included alongside others. Parents' aspirations for their children are integrated into planning decisions, and they share information about children's growth and development in individual portfolios and on-line assessments. Children benefit from teachers' commitment to providing a curriculum that responds to them as individuals and equips them well to take responsibility for their ongoing participation and learning.

Children experience positive transitions into and within the service, and on to school. The centre has established the role of primary caregiver that is highly successful in supporting children and parents during their time in the centre. Positive relationships have been developed with the neighbouring school, and this is resulting in feelings of connectedness and familiarity that help to promote continuity of learning.

The skilled and experienced head teacher provides strong leadership. She has undertaken professional development to further develop her leadership skills, and has developed a high level of trust and collaboration among staff. The head teacher shares her expertise and professional knowledge with the teaching team and the wider community. There is a high level of trust among staff, and teachers have an agreed understanding and ownership of the vision, values and goals of the centre. Together, they share responsibility for maintaining a culture where children are first and foremost valued, celebrated and affirmed for who they are and what they bring to their learning.

The well-informed professional leader provides effective support and leadership to the head teacher. Through her regular visits she maintains a deep awareness of the quality of the kindergarten's service to children and parents/whānau. She regularly monitors the fulfilment of the Trust's expectations and strategic direction for development. Her knowledgeable advice and guidance contributes to the kindergarten's self-review initiatives and their effectiveness in enhancing practice.

Key Next Steps

ERO and centre leaders agree that a next step for the centre is to review bicultural practice. Reviewing and aligning aspects of the centre’s bicultural practice with its child-led philosophy would be likely to further enhance the focus on te reo and tikanga Māori in the centre.

Teachers should also consider making more planned use of provocations and intentional teaching to add complexity to children's investigations and learning in the outdoor playground.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements. 

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipāhīhī will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

17 February 2017 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Taupō

Ministry of Education profile number

5205

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, aged over 2

Service roll

47

Gender composition

Boys 32 Girls 15

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other European

Other

Tokelau

Tongan

14

23

4

1

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2016

Date of this report

17 February 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

July 2013

Education Review

December 2010

Education Review

December 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipahihi

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipahihi to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Central Kids Kindergartens – Waipahihi is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipahihi is located in the suburb of Richmond Heights, Taupo, adjacent to Waipahihi School within the rohe o Ngāti Tuwharetoa It is licensed for a maximum of 40 children over the age of two. The kindergarten’s current roll is 43. Of the 21 children who are identified as Māori a significant number whakapapa to Ngāti Tuwharatoa. It provides education and care for children from 8.45am to 2.45pm daily. In 2012 the kindergarten was relicensed under the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. The kindergarten operates under the umbrella organisation Central North Island Kindergarten Trust (known as Central Kids).

The kindergarten’s philosophy places high priority on establishing close and respectful relationships with children and their whānau. It states a commitment to developing a sense of whānaungatanga and partnership with parents, family, and whānau, and recognises the important place of tangata whenua.

Since the previous ERO review, membership of the teaching team has remained stable. Teachers’ participation in the Ngāti Tuwharetoa Cultural Knowledge Project during 2010 to 2012 has led to a significant increase in their understanding of Tuwharetoa tikanga. This professional learning has also supported teachers to continue to implement a bicultural curriculum and to promote an inclusive service for Māori whānau.

The kindergarten has responded positively to the areas identified for development in the 2010 ERO report.

This review was part of a cluster of 13 reviews in the Central Kids umbrella organisation.

The Review Findings

The kindergarten’s curriculum is effectively designed and focused on promoting positive learning outcomes for children. The programme is responsive to children’s emerging interests and promotes learning through a play-based approach. Current programme priorities include:

  • the provision of a strong Te Ao Māori dimension that is integrated into the programme
  • the natural integration of literacy, mathematics, science, computer technology and creativity
  • opportunities for children to develop their skills and understanding of how to learn and play cooperatively with peers
  • regular excursions into the wider community.

ERO observed many examples of children engaged in meaningful and sustained play. Teachers skilfully involved themselves alongside children to extend and add complexity to play. They support and affirm the special talents of children with diverse needs. Children experience a calm, settled, and well-resourced environment where they are able to play independently, make decisions, and learn from each other. Māori tamariki and their whānau experience a strong sense of cultural identity and belonging in the kindergarten.

The knowledgeable and committed head teacher has led a successful focus on strengthening the quality of education and care that children and their families’ experience. She skilfully works alongside teachers, whānau and children to empower them to take responsibility for learning. The head teacher has established comprehensive systems, including focused and meaningful self review that contributes to a strong culture for continued improvement and ongoing sustainability.

Teachers work cooperatively to reflect on their practice and engage in meaningful conversations to enrich children’s experiences. They effectively document children’s learning in well presented and easily accessible individual profiles. These profiles reflect the learning partnerships that exist between children, teachers and whānau. Teachers are continuing to review and refine their assessment and planning practices.

The kindergarten continues to receive good quality support from Central Kids. The newly appointed Central Kids professional leader has established a positive and supportive relationship with the head teacher and staff. Comprehensive policy guidelines assist staff to meet regulatory requirements and Central Kids’ high standards and expectations.

As part of this review ERO evaluated the effectiveness of the kindergarten’s responsibilities for employment and management of staff. Central Kids have developed and implemented highly effective processes to appoint and support staff at the kindergarten.

Key Next Steps

ERO and kindergarten leaders agree that the key next step is to further develop the consistent use of high-quality teaching practices that promote positive learning outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipahihi completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Waipahihi will be in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

4 July 2013

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Taupo

Ministry of Education profile number

5205

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

43

Gender composition

Boys 26

Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Other

21

18

4

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2013

Date of this report

4 July 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

December 2010

 

Education Review

December 2007

 

Education Review

June 2003

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.