Central Kids Kindergartens - Rāwhiti

Education institution number:
5196
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
38
Telephone:
Address:

3 Konini Place, Matamata

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1. Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rawhiti

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Rawhiti to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Rawhiti operates under the umbrella of Central North Island Kindergarten Trust. The kindergarten is located in the rural township of Matamata. It is licensed to cater for 40 children from two years to school age. The kindergarten is open from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm Monday to Friday.

Since the previous ERO review, staffing has remained consistent. The kindergarten has a positive ERO reporting history. Management effectively responded to the 2012 ERO report recommendation to involve children in more sustained and complex exploration. Teachers have continued undertaking professional development to keep them well informed about current educational practices, theory and research.

The kindergarten is well-supported by the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust. The trust’s strategic direction sets out the service’s vision, expected educational outcomes, and values. It also defines the strategies for delivering the principles and strands of the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, and for respecting Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The trust’s professional leaders monitor the kindergarten’s compliance with policies and procedures to ensure it meets regulation requirements and management’s expectations. Kindergarten teachers have generous opportunities to attend professional development to grow their teaching and leadership skills.

Teachers have a shared understanding about what they value as high quality education and care as outlined in their service philosophy. This statement documents a commitment to the provision of opportunities that encourage children’s self-expression, self-esteem, self-help and social skills. Children’s learning is supported through exploration, social interactions and during fun times.

This review was part of a cluster of seven kindergartens reviews in the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Children and their families are warmly welcomed into Central Kids Kindergarten - Rawhiti. Teachers are knowledgeable about Te Whāriki and ensure an inclusive programme, where children have the opportunity to participate in high quality learning experiences.

Children’s interests, strengths and diverse abilities are valued by teachers who understand the unique and varying ways children learn and make sense of the world. Teachers are highly responsive and notice children’s strengths and interests. They encourage children to further investigate and learn in authentic and meaningful ways. Children are capable of making decisions and managing their own learning pathways.

Teachers are highly skilled in engaging children in learning conversations. They build on children’s understanding, knowledge and lifelong-learning dispositions through the well-established positive, trusting relationships they have with them. Teachers view children as capable learners, and as a result children are confident to actively explore, investigate, problem solve and make informed decisions.

Children have access to high quality equipment and resources that promote learning in literacy, mathematics, music and science. Children’s creativity and imagination is generously catered for and encouraged to support higher level thinking. Access to technology such as iPads promotes children’s digital intelligence. The physical environment is thoughtfully prepared to provide children with challenge. They can take informed risks, and have many opportunities to capably assess situations and develop a range of useful strategies that help them achieve success.

Teachers have established a kindergarten culture where children learn in an emotionally safe, social context that cares for their wairua (spirit). They model positive ways of socialising and communicating. Children learn about fairness, social justice and skills that help them negotiate, take on other points of view and be responsible for the wellbeing of themselves and others. Children’s social competencies are nurtured and they are skilled in developing friendships and communicating with others.

Teachers value parents’ knowledge about their own children. Parents and family members are viewed as essential partners in their child’s learning. The culture, language and identity of each family is embraced by teachers. Teachers support Māori ways of knowing and being, and they celebrate and acknowledge Māori as tangata whenua.

High quality assessment portfolios provide a rich record of children’s learning and progress. These capture the complex ways in which children learn and how teachers extend on their learning through play. Families have access to these in hard copy and on the internet. They are able to contribute, share children’s home experiences, and be actively involved in their child’s learning. These strong connections between the kindergarten and home experiences foster children’s belief in themselves as capable and successful learners.

The experienced head teacher provides sound professional leadership for the kindergarten. She is well known in the community and is now enjoying second generational families returning to the kindergarten. Staff are well supported by a knowledgeable professional leader who provides strong support and guidance for the service. The head teacher operates a shared leadership model for teachers and support staff.

Teachers are strong advocates for children and their families. Well-established self-review processes enable teachers to systematically inquire into, and evaluate the effectiveness of, their practices in promoting positive outcomes for children and their families.

Key Next Steps

Leaders and teachers have identified through robust self-review processes areas for ongoing inquiry. They intend to further develop high quality practices in:

  • information and communication technologies (ICT)
  • environmental sustainability
  • embedding te ao Māori into assessment practices.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rawhiti completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

curriculum
premises and facilities
health and safety practices
governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Rawhiti will be in four years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

18 November 2015

2. Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Matamata

Ministry of Education profile number

5196

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

49

Gender composition

Boys 26

Girls 23

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

South East Asian

Indian

Samoan

12

29

6

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

September 2015

Date of this report

18 November 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

These are available at www.ero.govt.nz

Education Review

September 2012

 

Education Review

October 2009

 

Education Review

September 2006

3. General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1. About the Centre

Location

Matamata

Ministry of Education profile number

5196

Type

Kindergarten

Number licensed for

90 children

Roll number

92 (some shared positions)

Gender composition

Boys 47

Girls 45

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Pakehā 68

New Zealand Mäori 15

Other European 4

Chinese 1

Indian 2

Other 2

Review team on site

September 2009

Date of this report

14 October 2009

Previous ERO reports

Education Review September 2006

Education Review August 2003

Accountability Review May 1998

2. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Rawhiti Kindergarten operates under the umbrella of the Central North Island Kindergarten Association (CNIKA) who provide professional and governance support. The kindergarten is located in the township of Matamata, has 92 children on its roll, and provides sessional early childhood education for children from two years to school age.

Since the last review there have been several changes in teaching staff and there has been a building upgrade, including the addition of a verandah and entrance way.

Children continue to receive good quality education and care from a dedicated teaching team. A feature of the kindergarten are the attractive learning environments which invite children to engage and explore their surroundings. There is an extensive range of high quality equipment and resources which is easily accessible to children as they move freely between inside and outside play areas. The inside areas of play are well organised to encourage children to investigate and participate in a wide range of activities including music, science and the creative and dramatic arts.

The skills and language of literacy and mathematics are fully integrated into the daily programme and children are being well prepared for future learning in these areas. Books and stories are regularly read, acted out and shared, and high levels of purposeful oral language were evident among teachers and children. Children have extensive access to manipulative equipment to introduce and reinforce early mathematical concepts and language.

Children’s learning and development are enriched through the emphasis placed on the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Teachers use te reo Mäori in the programme as well as natural materials for activities and for wall displays within the environment.

Positive and respectful relationships are evident at all levels of the kindergarten community. Teachers know children well and respond promptly to their education and care needs. Affirming relationships are resulting in a safe and secure physical and emotional environment.

Considerable progress has been made by teachers in assessment, planning and evaluation. Planning walls make children’s learning journeys more visual and able to be revisited by families. Well-illustrated individual profiles include teacher observations and comments relating to children’s dispositions for learning. Parents value these profiles as a detailed record of their child’s involvement in kindergarten activities, and are encouraged to add their own comments to them.

The highly experienced head teacher is providing well-informed and efficient leadership for the kindergarten. She has particular strengths in establishing and sustaining relationships with children, staff, parents and the wider community. Her collaborative leadership style is contributing to a supportive team culture among staff and a shared sense of direction for the kindergarten community.

Effective communication is ensuring parents feel supported and well informed about their child’s progress and kindergarten happenings. The kindergarten supports parents with their child’s transition to school through thorough documentation, considered advice and school visits. Families/whänau feel welcome in the kindergarten and contribute actively both to the programme and as members of the committee.

Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interests of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again as part of the regular review cycle.

3. Review Priorities

The Focus of the Review

Before the review, the management of Rawhiti Kindergartenwas invited to consider its priorities for review using guidelines and resources provided by ERO. ERO also used documentation provided by the centre to contribute to the scope of the review.

The detailed priorities for review were then determined following a discussion between the ERO review team and the management and staff. This discussion focused on existing information held by the centre (including self-review information) and the extent to which potential issues for review contributed to positive outcomes for children at Rawhiti Kindergarten.

All ERO education reviews in early childhood focus on the quality of education. For ERO this includes the quality of:

  • the programme provided for children;
  • the learning environment; and
  • the interactions between children and adults.

ERO’s findings in these areas are set out below.

The Quality of Education

Background

The kindergarten aims through its philosophy to help children become confident learners and communicators, by providing an environment that is warm and caring. Teachers believe that play is an appropriate and effective method of learning for young children. Through the programme, children are encouraged to enjoy and explore music, and develop a sense of belonging and respect for themselves and others within a safe and supportive environment. Teachers aim to recognise and value the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi with te reo and tikanga practices integrated into the daily programme.

Areas of good performance

Learning environment: A feature of the kindergarten is the attractive learning environment which invites children to engage and explore their surroundings. Teachers make effective use of outside spaces to provide opportunities for physical challenge, the development of gross and fine motor skills and independent and social play. There is an extensive range of high quality equipment and resources which is easily accessible to children as they move freely between inside and outside play areas. The inside walls of the kindergarten are used for visually effective displays of children’s work, captioned photographs and computerised displays of prior learning activities. The inside areas of play are well organised to encourage children to investigate and participate in a wide range of activities including music, science and the creative and dramatic arts. Children’s learning and development benefits from stimulating and well established environments.

Literacy and mathematics: The skills and language of literacy and mathematics are well integrated into the daily programme. Books and stories are regularly read, acted out and shared, and high levels of oral language are evident among teachers and children. Opportunities to develop and understand written language are provided through activities such as book making, the use of name boards and the home/kindergarten diary which is shared at mat time. Children have extensive access to manipulative equipment to introduce and reinforce early mathematical concepts and language. These experiences are providing a sound foundation for future learning in literacy and mathematics.

Leadership: The highly experienced head teacher is providing well-informed and efficient leadership for the kindergarten. She has particular strengths in establishing and sustaining relationships with children, staff, parents and the wider community. The head teacher has a good knowledge of current early childhood practice and has been a resource person for external professional development. She provides well documented guidelines for the professional practice of staff and for kindergarten operations. Her collaborative leadership style is contributing to a supportive team culture among staff and a shared sense of direction for the kindergarten community.

Relationships: Positive and respectful relationships are evident at all levels of the kindergarten community. Teachers know children well and respond promptly to their education and care needs. Children relate positively to each other and are given positive guidance to resolve any incidents constructively. Families/whänau feel welcome in the kindergarten and contribute actively both to the programme and as members of the committee. Affirming relationships are resulting in a settled and harmonious climate.

Communication with families: Effective communication is enabling parents to feel supported and well informed about their child’s progress and kindergarten happenings. Prior to entry into the kindergarten parents receive an informative enrolment pack and have the opportunity to attend an induction meeting. Purposeful notice board and wall displays, and regular newsletters ensure parents are kept up to date with centre information. The kindergarten also supports parents with their child’s transition to school with thorough documentation, considered advice and school visits. The high levels of communication by teachers and the administration officer are fostering in families a sense of being recognised and valued.

Assessment and planning: Considerable progress has been made by teachers in assessment, planning and evaluation. Since the last review teachers have undertaken professional development through Kei tua o te Paeworkshops. Planning walls make children’s learning journeys more visual and able to be revisited by families. Well- illustrated individual profiles include teacher observations and comments relating to children’s dispositions for learning. Parents value these profiles as a detailed record of their child’s involvement in kindergarten activities, and are encouraged to add their own comments to them. Well-developed assessment and planning approaches are helping to make children’s learning more visible, and are also assisting in forging a partnership between teachers and parents.

Association support: The Central North Island Kindergarten Association (CNIKA) provides effective professional and governance support. The practice manager visits the kindergarten regularly and provides professional guidance and feedback to the head teacher and staff. She is also responsible for overseeing performance management and the advice and guidance programme for the provisionally registered teacher. The Pouawhina assists with ongoing staff development in te reo and tikanga Mäori. CNIKA also provides extensive policy and operational guidelines to enable the smooth operation of the kindergarten. The quality of kindergarten operations and programmes for children is enhanced by the strong contribution of the Association.

Area for improvement

Ownership of the learning: Currently, some children’s learning activities are teacher directed. On occasions, the development of children’s complex play could be influenced by teacher-led organisation of the environment and use of resources. Attention to these areas of practice and organisation are likely to lead to children having greater responsibility for, and ownership of, their own learning.

4. Areas of National Interest

Overview

ERO provides information about the education system as a whole through its national reports. This information will be used as the basis for long term and systemic educational improvement.

Māori Children

As part of this review ERO evaluated the extent to which this service carries out a process to identify and respond to the aspirations and expectations of the parents and whānau of Māori children and focuses on the potential of Māori children to develop as competent and capable learners.

Areaof good performance

Mäori dimension: The head teacher and staff demonstrate a strong commitment to integrating a Mäori perspective into kindergarten operations. Teachers make regular and appropriate use of te reo Mäori for praise, simple instructions and greetings. In the environment teachers have made a conscious effort to introduce natural materials, employ Mäori design patterns and to use kete as receptacles for resources. Children have opportunities to experience Mäori culture through visits from a local school kapa haka group and the use of their own poi and piu piu. Aspirations of Māori whänau are respected and gathered through informal methods and surveys. Māori children’s learning and development are enriched through the emphasis placed on the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa/New Zealand.

5. Management Assurance on Compliance Areas

Overview

Before the review, the licensee and staff of Rawhiti Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Management Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they have attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • administration;
  • health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management;and
  • financial and property management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on outcomes for children:

  • emotional safety (including behaviour management, prevention of bullying and abuse);
  • physical safety (including behaviour management, sleeping and supervision practices; accidents and medication; hygiene and routines; travel and excursion policies and procedures);
  • staff qualifications and organisation; and
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

EROs investigation did not identify any areas of concern.

6. Recommendation

ERO and the Centre Management agreed that:

  1. the head teacher and staff reflect in depth on current educational knowledge and practice about empowering children to take greater responsibility for their own learning.

7. Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interests of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again as part of the regular review cycle.

Dr Graham Stoop

Chief Review Officer

To the Parents and Community of Rawhiti Kindergarten

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Rawhiti Kindergarten.

Rawhiti Kindergarten operates under the umbrella of the Central North Island Kindergarten Association (CNIKA) who provide professional and governance support. The kindergarten is located in the township of Matamata, has 92 children on its roll, and provides sessional early childhood education for children from two years to school age.

Since the last review there have been several changes in teaching staff and there has been a building upgrade, including the addition of a verandah and entrance way.

Children continue to receive good quality education and care from a dedicated teaching team. A feature of the kindergarten are the attractive learning environments which invite children to engage and explore their surroundings. There is an extensive range of high quality equipment and resources which is easily accessible to children as they move freely between inside and outside play areas. The inside areas of play are well organised to encourage children to investigate and participate in a wide range of activities including music, science and the creative and dramatic arts.

The skills and language of literacy and mathematics are fully integrated into the daily programme and children are being well prepared for future learning in these areas. Books and stories are regularly read, acted out and shared, and high levels of purposeful oral language were evident among teachers and children. Children have extensive access to manipulative equipment to introduce and reinforce early mathematical concepts and language.

Children’s learning and development are enriched through the emphasis placed on the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Teachers use te reo Mäori in the programme as well as natural materials for activities and for wall displays within the environment.

Positive and respectful relationships are evident at all levels of the kindergarten community. Teachers know children well and respond promptly to their education and care needs. Affirming relationships are resulting in a safe and secure physical and emotional environment.

Considerable progress has been made by teachers in assessment, planning and evaluation. Planning walls make children’s learning journeys more visual and able to be revisited by families. Well-illustrated individual profiles include teacher observations and comments relating to children’s dispositions for learning. Parents value these profiles as a detailed record of their child’s involvement in kindergarten activities, and are encouraged to add their own comments to them.

The highly experienced head teacher is providing well-informed and efficient leadership for the kindergarten. She has particular strengths in establishing and sustaining relationships with children, staff, parents and the wider community. Her collaborative leadership style is contributing to a supportive team culture among staff and a shared sense of direction for the kindergarten community.

Effective communication is ensuring parents feel supported and well informed about their child’s progress and kindergarten happenings. The kindergarten supports parents with their child’s transition to school through thorough documentation, considered advice and school visits. Families/whänau feel welcome in the kindergarten and contribute actively both to the programme and as members of the committee.

Future Action

ERO is confident that the service is being managed in the interests of the children. Therefore ERO is likely to review the service again as part of the regular review cycle.

When ERO has reviewed an early childhood centre we encourage management to inform their community of any follow up action they plan to take. You should talk to the management or licensee if you have any questions about this evaluation, the full ERO report or their future intentions.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the centre or see the ERO website, http://www.ero.govt.nz.

 

Dr Graham Stoop

Chief Review Officer

General Information About Reviews

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve quality of education for children in early childhood centres; and
  • provide information to parents, communities and the Government.

Reviews are intended to focus on outcomes for children and build on each centre’s self review.

Review Focus

ERO’s framework for reviewing and reporting is based on four review strands.

  • Quality of Education – including the quality of the programme provided for children, the quality of the learning environment and the quality of the interactions between staff and children and how these impact on outcomes for children.
  • Additional Review Priorities – other aspects of the operation of a centre, may be included in the review. ERO will not include this strand in all reviews.
  • Areas of National Interest – information about how Government policies are working in early childhood centres.
  • Compliance with Legal Requirements – assurance that this centre has taken all reasonable steps to meet legal requirements.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of centre performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to this centre.

Review Recommendations

Most ERO reports include recommendations for improvement. A recommendation on a particular issue does not necessarily mean that a centre is performing poorly in relation to that issue. There is no direct link between the number of recommendations in this report and the overall performance of this centre.