Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki

Education institution number:
5195
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
26
Telephone:
Address:

10 Marshall Street, Kawerau

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1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki is located in a residential area of Kawerau. It is licenced for 30 children from two years to school age, and operates under the umbrella of Central North Island Kindergarten Trust (CNIKT). At the time of this review 32 children were enrolled including 25 who identify as Māori.

Central Kids Kindergartens' philosophy aligns with the principles and strands of the early childhood education curriculum, Te Whāriki. Managerial and administrative support is provided by the head office team and includes aspects such as human resources, policy development, finance and cultural support. A professional leader provides ongoing support and guidance for the head teacher and teaching team. CNIKT provides significant professional learning and development for the early childhood education sector on a national basis.

The kindergarten philosophy places a strong emphasis on whakawhanaungatanga, mahi tahi and acknowledging all people and their connections to the whenua. The same vision and values are evident through teacher appraisal and professional practice, which reflects the culturally responsive principles of the Ministry of Education document Tātaiako.

This review was part of a cluster of seven kindergartens reviewed in the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Teacher relationships with children and whānau are based on attitudes of acceptance, respect and a willingness to listen and change. Teaching practice reflects an increasingly well-developed understanding of the essence of the Māori child – their mana, wairua and mauri. Teachers are supportive and responsive. Intentional teaching includes open questioning, and often make links to Māori literacy, which is the current focus of internal evaluation. Teachers use positive guidance strategies effectively to help children to develop their social competencies, problem solving and self-management skills. Children with additional needs and challenges are well supported by the CNIKT service, external agencies and appropriately trained teachers. Whānau are fully involved as partners in their child's learning and development, especially during important transitions into and from the kindergarten. Children are well supported to become confident, capable life-long learners.

Inside and outdoor environments are thoughtfully prepared and presented to support children’s exploration and engagement. Extensive use is made of natural resources and children can engage with the living world through community gardens and the kindergarten's pet animals. Children benefit from extended periods of uninterrupted play so they are able to initiate and sustain their own learning. Older children are confident to help others, demonstrating the principle of tuakāna teina. Literacy, especially Māori literacy, and mathematics are well integrated into the daily programme. Children can also demonstrate curiosity and creativity through dramatic play, construction and physically challenging activities.

A strength of kindergarten is the depth of development of planning, assessment and evaluation based on Te Whātu Pokeka, the kaupapa Māori framework for assessment. Teachers actively explore contexts and methods that contribute to nurturing all aspects of Māori children. A deep knowledge of the child and their kaupapa is at the heart of teachers' understanding how children learn, and how this should be developed and recorded in partnership with whānau. The curriculum is strongly based on Māori ways of knowing, being and doing. Different sources of knowledge are sought and respected, so that children, teachers, whānau and community members can all contribute to learning experiences and the programme. Success for all children and their whānau, especially Māori, is normalised and promoted. Children’s language culture and identity are valued and affirmed.

Leadership practice is closely aligned with the centre’s inclusive and bicultural philosophy and is providing a shared vision and a sense of positive purpose for the kindergarten community. The head teacher and teachers have successfully established a culture in which children are first and foremost valued, affirmed and celebrated for who they are, where they come from and what they bring. Whānau hui are held regularly, including the sharing of kai. These hui are a practical example of the shared approach to leadership, which allows teachers, whānau and children to contribute their different cultural knowledge and experiences to enrich the curriculum experienced by all.

CNIKT provides effective governance. The kindergarten is effectively supported by a professional leader. She provides regular and detailed reports and feedback to the head teacher and teaching teams. This supports the centre to meet legislative requirements, and to ensure that this practise aligns with the CNIKT philosophy. The organisation has created comprehensive systems and practices that effectively promote positive outcomes for all children. The trust has a strong commitment to empowering emerging leaders and also provides generous professional development for teachers.

Key Next Steps

ERO and kindergarten leaders agree that the next step is to consolidate and extend the current progress that has been made in curriculum and teaching practice, in partnership with whānau and the wider educational community.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Pūtauaki will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

31 October 2017

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Kawerau

Ministry of Education profile number

5195

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, aged over 2 years

Service roll

32

Gender composition

Boys 19 Girls 13

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Chinese
Indian
South East Asian

25
4
1
1
1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

31 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Supplementary Review

July 2014

Education Review

May 2013

Education Review

June 2010

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Putauaki

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Putauaki to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Central Kids Kindergartens – Putauaki is now well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children. They have made significant progress in addressing areas of concern identified in the 2013 Education Review in relation to leadership, self review, assessment practice and the environment. In addition the kindergarten has addressed all areas of non-compliance identified in that report.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Putauaki provides education and care for children from two years of age in 6 hour sessions. It operates under the umbrella organisation of Central North Island Kindergarten Trust (known as Central Kids). At the time of the ERO review the kindergarten roll was 24. There are 18 children who are identified as Māori. The majority of Māori children whakapapa to Tūwharetoa.

Since the ERO review in 2013, staffing at the kindergarten has changed. The head teacher has remained and a long-term relieving teacher and administration person have been appointed.

The kindergarten’s philosophy makes a commitment to embracing the beliefs and values of Whakawhanaungatanga. Teachers work closely with whānau to provide education for their children. Teachers’ participation in the Ministry of Education professional development programme, ‘Incredible Years', has supported this focus and enhanced their skills in developing children’s social learning. In addition, teachers are undertaking professional learning and development in Te Whatu Pokeka, Māori assessment practices. They are excited about bringing this into their planning systems to foster children’s language, culture, and identity particularly as Māori.

The 2013 ERO review identified significant areas of concern in relation to leadership, assessment practice and self review. This Education Review evaluates the extent to which these areas of concern have been addressed.

The Review Findings

The trust has continued to work and support the kindergarten throughout the last twelve months. Trust personal have contributed to the kindergarten in areas of finance, personnel, resourcing management and administration support.

The professional leader employed by the trust is providing highly effective and targeted leadership for the kindergarten and community. She has been very supportive and has worked consistently with the head teacher to bring about the changes necessary to improve outcomes for children. The kindergarten is now operating at a level that is consistent with the trust’s vision and philosophy for quality education and care.

Teachers have benefited from focused professional learning and development provided by the trust. This has resulted in the strengthening of leadership, self review, assessment practice, and the quality of interactions between teachers and children.

The head teacher, with support from the professional leader and staff, has developed clear guidelines, expectations and systems for managing the day-to-day operation of the kindergarten. The newly established teaching team is developing a cohesive approach to teaching and learning. This is based on strong, trusting relationships and the establishment of clear expectations.

They are actively involved alongside children in play and promote children’s independence, and support them to follow their interests. Teachers notice children’s learning and development, and are increasingly planning how they can best extend children’s knowledge, understandings and skills. They effectively include aspects of te reo and tikanga Māori in daily routines and interactions. The Māori dimension in the kindergarten is strong.

Children benefit from highly caring, responsive and respectful relationships with teachers. Parents and whānau are welcome in the centre at any time, and readily share information with teachers about their children. This information is well used to support children’s development and learning.

ERO and kindergarten leaders agree that the priorities for ongoing development, as identified in the kindergarten’s annual plan, are refinement of teacher’s assessment, planning and evaluation, and review of language, culture and identity. Continued support from the trust and further development in these areas is likely to embed good practices and continue to promote positive outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Putauaki completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Putauaki will be in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

28 July 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Kawerau

Ministry of Education profile number

5195

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

25

Gender composition

Girls 13 Boys 12

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

19

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

28 July 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2013

 

Education Review

June 2010

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.