Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles

Education institution number:
5166
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
33
Telephone:
Address:

4 Charles Crescent, Putaruru

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1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens – Charles, located in Putaruru, is licensed to provide all-day education and care for 30 tamariki from two years to school age. The current roll of 28 tamariki includes 11 who identify as Māori. Tamariki and whānau come from a wide geographical area. The kindergarten operates under the governance and management of the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust, a community not-for-profit organisation.

The overarching philosophy of the trust is to provide kindergartens where children learn through play and are supported to reach their potential. Central Kids Kindergartens – Charles philosophy is currently under review. Priority is placed on tamariki, whānau, taha Māori, Raukawatanga and kotahitanga.

Since the 2015 ERO review there have been several changes to the leadership and teaching team. The new kaiarataki, and recently appointed head teacher, have prioritised the development of bicultural practices and staff appraisal. The areas for development identified in the previous ERO report related to assessment, planning and evaluation remain a priority. All teachers are fully qualified and registered.

This review was part of a cluster of four kindergarten reviews in the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Tamariki experience a well-designed localised curriculum that effectively promotes history, stories and language of Raukawa. Connections to the community and sustainable practices are also promoted. Kaupapa Māori concepts such as manaakitanga, whanaungatanga and kaitiakitanga underpin curriculum decisions and experiences for tamariki. Te reo and tikanga Māori is understood by tamariki. This learning is shared at home, strengthening relationships amongst kaiako, whānau and tamariki. Māori children experience success as Māori through the normalisation of te reo, tikanga and Māori ways of knowing and being.

Kaiako provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for all. Tamariki with additional learning and development needs are well supported through inclusive practices, personalised learning and development plans. Kaiako work effectively with external agencies to support educational success of tamariki. Responsive and flexible practices successfully support the transition of tamariki into and beyond the kindergarten. Kaiako give tamariki time and space to problem solve and add complexity to their own learning. Tamariki are viewed as competent and confident learners, and experience an environment that fosters resilience, independence and positive self esteem.

A process for planning is in the early stages of development. Assessment reflects the interests of tamariki and their engagement in the programme. Digital and kindergarten-based portfolios enable tamariki to revisit their learning and parents and whānau are encouraged to comment and contribute.

Leadership is developing internal evaluation practices focused on improving the quality of outcomes for tamariki. There is a high-level commitment to honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles. Leadership is building the capacity of kaiako to develop a shared understanding for practice. Tino Rangatiratanga underpins the leadership approach, where the strengths of all are valued. There is a strong focus on promoting equitable opportunities to support participation and educational success for all.

Governance and management have comprehensive, well-established systems and practices to enable the organisation to monitor, evaluate and plan for improvement for the kindergarten. Clear guidelines and expectations for kindergarten practice and curriculum are strongly fostered by the leadership team and trust. The vision and values support positive outcomes for the learning and wellbeing of tamariki and their whānau.

Key Next Steps

Leaders and kaiako need to strengthen assessment, planning and evaluation practices to:

  • include utilising the learning outcomes from Te Whāriki to support individual planning

  • show progression of learning and increasing complexity over time

  • develop learning-focused partnerships with parents.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

24 April 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Putaruru

Ministry of Education profile number

5166

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, aged over 2

Service roll

28

Gender composition

Girls 15 Boys 13

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other

11
16
1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

February 2019

Date of this report

24 April 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

December 2015

Education Review

August 2012

Education Review

July 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles

How well placed is Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles, located in Putaruru, is licensed to provide all-day education and care for 30 children over two years of age. At the time of this ERO review, there were 41 children enrolled, 17 of whom identify as Māori. Children and their families come from a wide geographical area.

Since the 2012 ERO review, leaders and teachers have been strongly focused on improving communication and the quality of relationships within the teaching team. Teachers have engaged in extensive review of the centre philosophy to help build shared understandings. They have also developed a vision acknowledging their diversity and promoting positive outcomes for children. Some progress has been made in the other areas for improvement identified in the 2012 ERO report. The head teacher has strengthened self-review practices and teachers have had focused professional development to improve assessment, planning and evaluation practices. Both areas continue to need further development.

Teachers have participated in professional learning and development to better support children to become socially competent. In addition, they have been developing skills to digitally present children’s learning and assessment for parents and whānau. Teachers are all fully qualified and a teacher aide and administration person provides valuable support for teachers and children.

The kindergarten is well supported by the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust. The trust’s strategic direction sets out the service’s vision, expected educational outcomes, and values. It also defines the strategies for delivering the principles and strands of the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, and for respecting Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The trust’s professional leaders monitor the kindergarten’s compliance with policies and procedures to ensure it meets regulation requirements and management expectations. Kindergarten teachers have generous opportunities to attend professional development opportunities to grow their teaching and leadership skills.

This review was part of a cluster of eight kindergarten reviews within the Central North Island Kindergarten Trust.

The Review Findings

Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children. Children and their families experience warm, welcoming relationships with staff. Parents and children demonstrate a strong sense of belonging within the kindergarten environment. Teachers know children and their families well. They use their professional knowledge and experience to implement appropriate individual support and seek help for children when needed.

Children are confident communicators and self-directed learners who are happy to play individually or in small groups. They make their wishes known to adults, and each other, and are developing skills to independently manage their own routines. Teachers are effectively implementing strategies such as affirmation, commenting, and coaching to promote appropriate behaviours. They respond to and support children’s play activities. Teachers recognise that a next step is to extend and enrich children’s learning.

The spacious, well-resourced environment is thoughtfully presented to support children’s choices. Children have access to a wide range of equipment, resources and materials. There are opportunities for quiet as well as physically challenging activities. Literacy and mathematics are well integrated throughout the kindergarten environment. Children’s learning and creative work are attractively displayed.

Within the kindergarten programme, there is a focus on promoting natural resources, learning about the living world, and environmental sustainability. Ongoing development of the outdoor environment is involving children and their families in enhancing and improving learning opportunities for children. Excursions into the local community and visits from providers of educational programmes, extend and enhance the programme for children.

Teachers have made progress in increasing the use of te reo Māori and the visibility of te ao Māori in the kindergarten environment. They acknowledge that this is an area for ongoing professional learning and development.

Good progress has been made in recording children’s learning activities, interests and challenges. Teachers collate information from the learning stories to inform them about individual children’s interests and needs. They now need to make better use of this information to inform planning for future learning opportunities.

Parents shared examples where children have extended their learning into the home setting. Parents and whānau are now able to access children’s learning stories online and provide feedback. Positive relationships have been established with local schools and teachers sensitively manage children’s transition to school.

The head teacher is being well supported by the trust and is working with the professional leader to grow her leadership skills and the capability of the teaching team. She has participated in a wide range of professional learning and development. The head teacher is a reflective practitioner who seeks advice and guidance when appropriate.

Leaders are implementing the trust’s revised appraisal process, including teacher reflection and evidence related to meeting the requirements of the professional teaching criteria. Teachers have yet to fully embed all the requirements of this appraisal process.

While there is a sound process for self review, the head teacher has identified that there are aspects that need to be strengthened.

Key Next Steps

ERO has identified, and the head teacher agrees, that the key next steps for the teaching team are to:

  • explore ways to extend and enrich children’s inquiries and investigations
  • make better use of children’s assessment information to plan for their future learning opportunities
  • continue to increase their confidence and knowledge in using te reo Māori and responding to children’s culture and identity
  • strengthen appraisal by including analysis of evidence and showing how professional development has influenced their practice, and improved outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Central Kids Kindergartens - Charles will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

22 December 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Putaruru

Ministry of Education profile number

5166

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

41

Gender composition

Girls 22 Boys 19

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other

17

18

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

22 December 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2012

 

Education Review

July 2009

 

Education Review

August 2006

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.