Clayton Park Kindergarten

Education institution number:
5116
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
37
Telephone:
Address:

Coxhead Road, Manurewa, Auckland

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Clayton Park Kindergarten - 18/01/2016

1 Evaluation of Clayton Park Kindergarten

How well placed is Clayton Park Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Clayton Park Kindergarten is located alongside the Clayton Park School in Manurewa and offers session times that match school hours. Nineteen of the children enrolled are Māori and nine have Pacific heritage.

The kindergarten is part of the Counties Manukau Kindergarten Association (CMKA), which provides a management framework for the kindergarten. A professional practice manager (PPM) provides leadership and curriculum support for teachers.

The 2014 ERO report identified a significant number of areas that required improvement. A CMKA head teacher was seconded to work with the Clayton Park teachers from January 2015. She focused on building a collaborative teaching team and strong relationships with families. Teachers have participated in intensive professional learning to develop their understanding about the value and processes of self review and to strengthen teaching practices. Learning environments and resourcing have also been improved. A new permanent head teacher is to be appointed in 2016.

The Review Findings

The teaching team has made significant progress in all areas identified by ERO in 2014 as needing attention. The head teacher has provided strong curriculum leadership and made strategic decisions to improve kindergarten operations. Through her leadership and participation in a professional development contract, teachers are developing a sense of shared responsibility for curriculum planning and implementation.

Children are capable learners and communicators. They settle quickly on arrival, are comfortable working independently or in small groups, and confidently approach adults for assistance if needed. Cooperative imaginative play is a positive feature, and children’s creativity is encouraged. Teachers follow children’s lead and provide unobtrusive support for learning through conversations about child-initiated play ideas .

The kindergarten’s settled, inclusive tone supports children’s sense of belonging and encourages them to sustain their focus on activities. Children choose from a variety of good quality, well presented activities and resources that are thoughtfully selected by teachers in response to current interests. The outdoor area is attractively landscaped, offers physical challenge and supports extended creative play. Children’s literacy learning is supported throughout the kindergarten and children have good opportunities to explore science and mathematics concepts. Teachers plan to re-introduce environmental sustainability as a programme focus.

Teachers often include te reo Māori phrases, waiata, and books or activities with Māori themes. Their key goals are to continue strengthening bicultural practice and reviewing their support for Māori children. These goals should establish a strong foundation for Māori children’s ongoing educational success. Teachers include cultural events as part of the programme. More specific recognition of, and response to, the cultures, languages and identities of children from Pacific cultures would also be worthwhile.

Teachers have improved processes for assessment, programme planning and evaluation. Very good quality programme documentation and records of teachers’ discussions show their ongoing analysis of children’s learning progress and outcomes over time. Some individual learning records are especially good quality. Useful plans are developed for supporting children with special educational needs. Teachers continue to consider ways to refine their documentation.

Children make good use of their portfolios and displays of photographs and stories to look back at previous experiences and build on their learning. Whānau contributions to assessment and planning are sought and valued by teachers, and often included in stories about children’s learning. Parents have a growing sense of partnership with teachers.

The teaching team has established a culture of thoughtful self review that contributes to improved understanding about high quality teaching practices to enhance children’s learning. They have also developed good processes for in-depth review and ongoing reflection about teaching and learning. Clearer identification of their specific role in extending learning would help teachers to evaluate their own work in more depth.

The PPM writes useful reports after her visits to provide professional support for teachers. The reports prompt teachers to further think about their practice. They also contribute to the CMKA’s information about the quality of kindergarten practices and developments. The kindergarten’s annual plan is clearly aligned with the CMKA strategic goals.

Key Next Steps

The teachers and the PPM have identified key areas for further development. These include:

  • continuing to strengthen relationships and learning partnerships with whānau and local schools
  • strengthening bicultural practice and cultural responsiveness
  • deepening critical reflection and evaluative thinking.

Establishing clear action plans should help teachers to achieve their goals for improvement in teaching practices, the quality of educational programmes and outcomes for children. Planned professional development and ongoing PPM support should also help teachers to consolidate and build on new practices and become more confident and capable in their teaching and leadership roles.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Clayton Park Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Clayton Park Kindergarten will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

18 January 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Manurewa, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

5116

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

40

Gender composition

Girls 23 Boys 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Samoan

Tongan

other

19

10

4

4

3

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

18 January 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2014

 

Education Review

April 2011

 

Education Review

May 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years

Well placed – The next ERO review in three years

Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years

Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Clayton Park Kindergarten - 15/09/2014

1. Evaluation of Clayton Park Kindergarten

How well placed is Clayton Park Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

The teaching team requires focused support to improve curriculum leadership, management and implementation.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Clayton Park Kindergarten caters for a culturally diverse community in South Auckland. The majority of children enrolled have Māori or Pacific heritage. The kindergarten is licensed to provide education and care for up to 30 children over two years at each session. It operates a kindergarten day model, which allows children to attend sessions that match school hours. The kindergarten accesses early intervention support from the Ministry of Education for children with identified needs.

The head teacher has been at the kindergarten for many years. Centre staff also include two experienced teachers, an administrator, and a teacher aide, who are assisted by a small parent group. The teaching team has worked together for more than four years and has had many opportunities for professional learning and development.

The head teacher leads an interest in environmental sustainability and strong focus is also placed on maintaining relationships with the community. The Association supports a small playgroup that operates in the kindergarten twice each week, with a view to increasing local children’s participation in early childhood education and easing their transition into the kindergarten.

This review was part of a cluster of seven kindergarten reviews in the Counties Manukau Kindergarten Association.

The Association’s values, strategic goals and mission statement provide clear guidance for the kindergarten. A sound governance and management framework and professional personnel support kindergarten operations. A professional practice manager (PPM) provides management, leadership and curriculum support for teachers. The Association provides regular professional development opportunities.

ERO’s 2011 report identified the need to improve programme planning and assessment, and to increase children’s involvement in challenging, complex play and learning. The report also recommended that teachers improve their knowledge of bicultural practices and strengthen learning partnerships with whānau. Over the past year, the PPM has also promoted improvements in these areas. However, the quality of teaching and learning does not yet reflect the Association’s vision or expectations.

The Review Findings

Children relate well together and communicate confidently with adults. They select from the resources that teachers make available and use the environment flexibly. They play independently and creatively.

There is good support for children’s literacy learning. Teachers support their enjoyment of books and encourage children to experiment with writing and drawing. Children are becoming familiar with using computers. They enjoy revisiting the photographs and stories in their portfolios that show their involvement in many aspects of the programme and in regular excursions organised by teachers.

Professional development has supported teachers’ growing understandings about bicultural practice. They continue to build their confidence in using te reo Māori as a natural part of the programme.

Teachers maintain a variety of community links, particularly with the neighbouring school. They should now focus on establishing closer learning partnerships with whānau. This should further improve the responsiveness of programmes to children’s specific capabilities, cultural backgrounds and languages, and to parents’ aspirations for their children.

Teachers’ assessment and planning processes are not yet effective. There is little information available for whānau about their children’s learning experiences in the kindergarten. Strategies for supporting the youngest children in the kindergarten, or for extending learning for the most capable children have not been identified. Teachers should now work to build their skills in fostering children’s thinking and reasoning, particularly through in-depth, meaningful conversations about things that children are curious about. Children with specialist interventions should have an individual education plan. This individualised planning could then be reflected in teachers’ wider planning and practices.

The Association has supported the teaching team to build their understanding of self review. Teachers are at early stages of considering ways to strengthen their teaching practice and improve programmes for children.

Association systems for strategic planning and self review are well established. Performance appraisal processes have recently been adapted to enhance support for the ongoing growth and development of staff. The PPM knows the kindergarten well, provides professional support for teachers, and continually promotes high quality teaching and learning. The PPM regularly reports to the General Manager about the kindergarten’s progress. However, these systems have not been effective in promoting or achieving high quality practice in this kindergarten.

Key Next Steps

The Association managers agree that key next steps for the teaching team include:

  • building strong curriculum leadership and better shared understandings about best practice in early childhood education

  • more purposefully applying professional learning and critically reflecting on ways to continually improve teaching and learning

  • focussing planning and evaluation on improving provision for children’s learning

  • improving the resourcing and presentation of the learning environment to better reflect families’ cultures and to support complex, extended learning.

Focused, ongoing support from the PPM and targeted professional development are essential to help teachers implement the kindergarten’s philosophy and more consistently promote positive outcomes for children.

To enhance its management practices, the Association could consider making more deliberate connections between the kindergarten’s and Association’s self review and long-term planning.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Clayton Park Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

Actions for compliance

ERO identified areas of non-compliance relating to curriculum leadership and implementation. To meet requirements the teaching team needs to:

  • consistently plan, implement and evaluate a curriculum that is designed to enhance children’s learning and development, that responds to children’s learning interests, strengths and capabilities, and reflects an understanding of current research, theory and best practice in early childhood education

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008, 43(1a)Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, C2, 3 and 4.

Development Plan Recommendation

ERO recommends that the service consult with the Ministry of Education and plan to address the key next steps and actions outlined in this report.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Clayton Park Kindergarten will be within two years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

15 September 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2. Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Manurewa, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

5116

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 0 aged under 2

Service roll

49

Gender composition

Girls 25

Boys 24

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

Cook Island Māori

Tongan

Indian

South East Asian

other Pacific

other

18

7

5

4

3

2

2

2

6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80% Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2014

Date of this report

15 September 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

April 2011

 

Education Review

May 2008

 

Education Review

June 2005

3. General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.