Sandringham Kindergarten

Education institution number:
5103
Service type:
Free Kindergarten
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
40
Telephone:
Address:

2 Kenneth Avenue, Sandringham, Auckland

View on map

Sandringham Kindergarten - 13/02/2020

1 Evaluation of Sandringham Kindergarten

How well placed is Sandringham Kindergarten to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Sandringham Kindergarten is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Sandringham Kindergarten is licensed for up to 30 children over two years of age. It offers six-hour sessions and has three qualified teachers who are supported by an administrator and a teaching assistant. The kindergarten serves an increasingly multicultural community.

The kindergarten's philosophy emphasises the importance of relationships with children and their families. Children are respected and viewed as confident and independent learners. Teachers are inspired by a Reggio Emilia approach to teaching and learning. Te Tiriti o Waitangi is acknowledged as a guiding document for teacher practice.

ERO's 2015 report identified that the manager should strengthen the evaluative aspects of self review, extend teacher knowledge of te ao Māori and develop partnerships and cultural connections with the kindergarten community. There has been significant progress made in these areas.

The kindergarten is part of the Auckland Kindergarten Association (AKA), which provides leadership, a framework of policies and operational guidelines, support personnel and programmes of professional learning and development for staff. A new AKA structure and new leadership roles have been established, and new personnel appointed.

This review was part of a cluster of eight reviews in the Auckland Kindergarten Association.

The Review Findings

Children and their families experience a warm, welcoming and caring environment that is respectful of their culture, language and identity. Children are quick to settle into the programme and engage in positive relationships and interactions with both adults and other children. There are opportunities for children to lead aspects of the programme with confidence. Children are viewed as capable and competent learners. They are encouraged to be independent.

Teachers have thoughtfully developed the learning environment to promote different ways for children to be creative and active problem solvers. The environment is richly resourced and children engage in a wide variety of experiences that promote their curiosity. Children experience a calm and unhurried programme that recognises the individual pace of learning.

Teachers work as a collaborative team. They have a strong understanding of and a shared commitment to their revised philosophy, which has enhanced opportunities for children to learn. Teachers are supportive and respectful of their individual strengths and open to sharing ideas about practice.

Teachers' professional focus is aligned with the kindergarten's strategic priorities. Their Whakamanawa professional learning has made a significant impact on teachers' ability to use te reo Māori confidently and to implement bicultural practices throughout the programme. Children have good opportunities to learn about the dual heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand and showcase what they have learned. Ongoing, robust, professional dialogue about the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi supports teaching practices.

There is a strong focus on science, mathematics, literacy and social sciences throughout the programme. Teachers are building a local curriculum that is meaningful for children. A strong sense of history and community is being established and well documented.

Planning and assessment processes are clear, with a focus on the children's individuality and their learning dispositions. Children's records of learning show how they have the freedom to explore their environment. The learning that teachers value, respect and foster is aligned with whānau aspirations for their children.

The head teacher has built a responsive team. Individual strengths are identified through an appraisal process and opportunities for leadership are encouraged. The AKA systems, policies and procedures are used efficiently. A shared understanding of internal evaluation has resulted in ongoing improvements.

The AKA continues to provide support for kindergartens to strengthen bicultural practices. In many instances this has made a significant difference to teachers' confidence and capability. Specialist support impacts positively on teachers’ inclusion of children with additional learning needs. Priority is being given to re-establishing and supporting Parent Whānau Groups in all kindergartens. The strategic direction being established by new AKA leaders is providing a positive framework for kindergartens’ annual planning.

Key Next Steps

The teaching team has identified appropriate key next steps that include:

  • continuing to strengthen the extent to which children's learning progress is explicit in their assessment records

  • linking teachers' appraisal goals more clearly to learning outcomes for children.

It would be useful for AKA managers to:

  • clarify new roles and engage teaching teams in the implementation of the new structure across the AKA

  • increase the rigour of monitoring and quality assurance, and strengthen internal evaluation at all levels of the AKA

  • identify and implement strategies for achieving greater consistency of the practices that are strengths in some kindergartens, across the AKA.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Sandringham Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner

Director Review and Improvement Services (Northern)

Northern Region - Te Tai Raki

13 February 2020

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Sandringham, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

5103

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children over two years of age

Service roll

43

Gender composition

Girls 28 Boys 15

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Chinese
other ethnic groups

1
30
4
8

Percentage of qualified teachers

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2019

Date of this report

13 February 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2015

Education Review

April 2012

Education Review

September 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Sandringham Kindergarten - 29/05/2015

1 Evaluation of Sandringham Kindergarten

Sandringham Kindergarten How well placed is to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Sandringham Kindergarten serves a culturally diverse community in Central Auckland. In 2014 it changed from a sessional service to a Kindergarten Day Model of six hours per day. Teachers and the community have responded positively to this model.

The kindergarten is licensed to provide education and care for up to 30 children, with the majority being at least three years of age. The kindergarten team includes a head teacher, two other registered teachers, a teaching assistant and an administrator.

Relationships, child-directed learning and fostering children’s sense of wonder are features of the kindergarten philosophy. It also includes Māori concepts of manaakitanga, turangawaewae, tuakana teina and ako. Kindness, empathy and respect are fostered and modelled by teachers.

ERO’s 2012 report noted high quality teaching practices, children’s engagement in complex learning and improvement focused self review. The teaching team has continued to develop these features.

The kindergarten operates as part of the Auckland Kindergarten Association (AKA), which provides considered leadership, a management framework, support personnel and a programme of professional development for teachers.

After extensive review, consultation and development, the AKA has recently launched a new 10-year strategic direction. Its four strategic pillars or objectives relate to educational excellence, core organisational processes, community engagement and a future focus. These objectives are intended to guide the Association and its kindergartens in their ongoing development. The AKA’s approach to rolling out a substantial change in its organisational structure has been carefully considered.

New AKA roles have been established to provide more targeted support for kindergarten operations, curriculum and development. Professional development is planned to support kindergarten head teachers in their leadership and management roles. A Quality Improvement Process (QIP) is being developed and will be implemented to monitor quality in kindergartens and contribute to self review and ongoing improvement.

The Review Findings

Respectful, culturally responsive relationships underpin the centre’s inclusive and welcoming environment. Children are supported well to become capable, confident learners and communicators. They have a strong sense of belonging and show care and empathy for others.

The multicultural backgrounds of the families and community are strongly evident throughout the centre. Children’s home languages, identity and cultures are valued and included in the learning programme. The positive impact of teachers' increasing knowledge of tikanga Māori is evident in the depth of bicultural practices in the kindergarten.

Teachers build on children’s understanding of the world around them in meaningful ways. They sensitively support children to develop social skills, a love of learning and an understanding of science, literacy and mathematical concepts. They encourage children to investigate, explore and learn while playing. Children have fun and learn through self-directed sustained play.

The stimulating learning environment reflects teachers’ commitment to te ao Māori, multiculturalism and environmental sustainability. The landscaped outside area is reflective of the New Zealand context and well used by children as part of their imaginative play, physical activity and natural science exploration.

Teachers provide a high quality curriculum that reflects Te Whāriki the early childhood curriculum and the kindergarten’s philosophy. The curriculum is influenced by current educational research and the New Zealand Curriculum for schools. Programme planning is based on children’s ideas and interests. Assessment portfolios are a valued record of children's learning journey. These records celebrate each child’s successes, progress and cultural identity.

Parents/whānau are provided with very good information about the curriculum and encouraged to contribute their ideas and aspirations. Home and kindergarten partnerships are fostered and parents/whānau are actively involved in the kindergarten’s programme and events.

Teachers are skilled and self motivated. They work collaboratively and are committed to providing a high quality educational service. A culture of continuous improvement is supported by teachers’ research and professional learning.

AKA systems for monitoring and promoting improvement in kindergarten operations are well established. A variety of useful systems and processes contribute to the teaching team’s robust self review. This self review is both responsive and planned and focused on improvements to outcomes for children. Centre operations are also guided by clear future planning and a shared vision, linked to the AKA’s plan. There are sound systems in place for health, safety and accountability.

Key Next Steps

Teachers and the Professional Services Manager have identified key next steps. ERO agrees that these could include:

  • strengthening the evaluative aspects of self review
  • extending teacher knowledge of Te Ao Māori
  • developing partnerships and cultural connections with the kindergarten community

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Sandringham Kindergarten completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Sandringham Kindergarten will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

29 May 2015

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Sandringham, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

5103

Licence type

Free Kindergarten

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

30 children aged over 2 years

Service roll

53

Gender composition

Girls 28

Boys 25

Ethnic composition

Māori 1

Pākehā 36

Chinese/Korean/Japanese 5

Tongan 4

Indian 3

other 4

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

 

 

Over 2

1:10

Review team on site

March 2015

Date of this report

29 May 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review April 2012

Education Review September 2008

Education Review June 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.