Jumpstart Preschool Rimu

Education institution number:
50129
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
65
Telephone:
Address:

55a Rimu Street, Merrilands, New Plymouth

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1 Evaluation of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu

How well placed is Jumpstart Preschool Rimu to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Jumpstart Preschool Rimu is one of three locally owned and operated private early childhood education and care services in New Plymouth, operating under the Jumpstart umbrella. The centre is licensed for 65 children, including 15 up to two years of age. Of the children currently enrolled, 15 identify as Māori and four are of Pacific heritage.

The Nursery (children aged up to two) and Preschool (children aged two to four) are distinct, separately staffed areas within the centre.

The Jumpstart managing director supports the centre leaders (principals) and administrator in the day-to-day operation and ensures the strategic priorities are progressed. She works closely with and provides ongoing professional support to the principals and teachers.

The philosophy emphasises building strong, respectful relationships with children and parents. Promoting learning through play and development as socially competent capable learners are also emphasised. The philosophy is clearly shared with all who are involved in the centre.

The August 2014 ERO evaluation identified strengthening assessment, planning and evaluation practices as next steps. The centre, in association with the umbrella organisation, has successfully responded to these areas.

This review was part of a cluster of three reviews in Jumpstart preschools.

The Review Findings

Well-considered and effective support for learning, respectful care of children and a focus on improvement enable Jumpstart Preschool Rimu to be very well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

Reciprocal relationships with parents and whānau are a focus and strength. Children and families demonstrate a strong sense of belonging.

A wide range of high quality resources invites children's investigation and participation. The indoor and outdoor areas encourage involvement in a range of experiences, exploration, challenge and engagement with aspects of the natural environment.

Children demonstrate high levels of interest in the learning opportunities offered. Independence, social and self-management skills are well supported. Perseverance, ideas generated in play and oral language are reinforced and extended through conversations with others.

Adults in the Nursery develop close child-teacher-family relationships which allows them to understand and effectively respond to individual children’s cues and gestures. Care moments occur in a calm and respectful manner. The service's youngest children are given physical space and time to make their own choices.

Commitment to upholding Te Tiriti o Waitangi is evident. Te ao Māori values and beliefs are strongly reflected through interactions, the environment and within the learning programme. Children are confident contributors to experiences in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. Leaders are focused on continuing to strengthen practices that contribute to success for Māori children.

Children's interests and parent aspirations inform and guide the well-planned curriculum. Literacy, mathematics, science and creativity are well integrated.

A more individualised assessment and planning approach and focus on development of children's specific learning dispositions has been developed. An online programme that illustrates and celebrates the learning of individual children has been successfully introduced. It includes recognition of children's progress over time and enables two-way communication between families and teachers. 'My Learning Journey’ reports and associated parent conferences provide a further opportunity for parents and teachers to share children's learning.

A well-considered transition process effectively supports children and their families as they move into, through and out of the centre. Many children at Jumpstart Preschool Rimu move to the adjacent Jumpstart School when they are approximately four years of age.

Teachers and leaders work effectively as teams and across the organisation to promote positive outcomes for children. Sharing ideas about effective teaching, learning and care practices in regular meetings develops consistency and improves teacher capability.

Centre-wide professional learning has positively contributed to the development of a curriculum to better promote children’s learning. A comprehensive appraisal process supports improvement for teachers and leaders. There are clear links to the Practising Teacher Criteria and a focus on teachers' regular inquiry into their practice to improve outcomes. Greater use of formal observations of practice and ensuring cultural competency dimensions are more integrated, is a next step.

Self review, ongoing inquiry, planning evaluations and appraisal, provide insight into the effectiveness of teaching practices. Leaders foster collaborative review that leads to positive change and improvement. Professional learning is building evaluative capacity. Deeper analysis and sense-making of evidence collected as part of this process should strengthen teachers' ability to evaluate the effectiveness of their practice on outcomes for children.

Well-considered strategic plan goals are developed by the managing director in consultation with the centre leaders. These are influenced by parent, whānau, community and teacher input. Parent and staff surveys affirm practices and identify possible areas for further strengthening.

Effective management and leadership supports centre operation and build capability to promote positive outcomes for children. Quality assurance and well-developed communication processes foster successful leadership, teaching, awareness of service and legislative expectations and high quality practices. Regular review supports compliance with expectations.

Key Next Step

To build effective internal evaluation capacity and capability across the organisation in order to evaluate how effectively the services curriculum improves outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu will be in four years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

17 October 2017

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

New Plymouth

Ministry of Education profile number

50129

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

65 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

84

Gender composition

Boys 49, Girls 35

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
Other ethnic groups

15
62
4
3

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

17 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2014

Education Review

September 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whānaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu

How well placed is Jumpstart Preschool Rimu to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Jumpstart Preschool Rimu is one of three privately owned education and care services operating under the Jumpstart umbrella, in New Plymouth. The centre is licensed for 65 children, 15 up totwo years and 50 children aged two to five.

The recent reorganisation of staffing has led to team changes and the establishment of new leadership positions. Some settling in has occurred for children and adults. Teachers focus on developing effective channels of communication and a shared understanding of expected and suitable practice for children across the centre.

Currently, the centre has 80% of its staff who are qualified teachers. Managers have identified a goal to have 100% qualified staffing.

Since the September 2011 ERO report, staff have been involved in professional learning and development opportunities to assist them to grow and develop their practice. A recent review focus on planning and evaluation has led to changes that are in the early stages of being embedded. Developments to the environment, that promote exploration and discovery and reflect the centre’s local context, are ongoing.

The philosophy emphasises building strong relationships with children and parents, learning through play, communication, children’s development and supporting children as they move to school.

The Review Findings

Teachers see the child as a capable learner. Children show a good sense of belonging. They are responsive to familiar and predictable routines and expectations. There is an emphasis on encouraging literacy and numeracy in the programme. Staff encourage children’s independence. ERO believes there is an opportunity for adults to further make the most of their interactions to extend children’s thinking and problem solving.

Indoor and outdoor learning areas inspire children’s curiosity and allow them to follow and build on their interests. A focus on natural materials and sensory experiences is evident in the outdoor spaces. Children explore the large indoor space confidently and with a sense of purpose. A calm, unhurried atmosphere prevails across the centre.

Infants and toddlers are well cared for. Their sense of security is appropriately fostered. Children’s language development is generally well supported by adults who encourage their thinking and build on their ideas. Other practices include:

  • calm and unhurried care routines that encourage sustained interactions
  • promoting independence and self-help skills
  • following children’s interests.

Teachers need to develop their bicultural practices. This commitment is evident across the centre with teachers appropriately incorporating Māori language and learning contexts in meaningful ways. Acknowledged next steps are to develop strategies and approaches to effectively promote Māori children’s success as Māori.

Information is shared with parents and whānau in a wide range of ways. Staff value parents’ contributions. They have established reciprocal links with local schools to support children and families as they move to school.

Managers have a clear vision and strategic direction for the centre that guides long-term and annual planning. There is a commitment to ongoing improvement. Well-developed systems and processes usefully outline expectations for managing day-to-day operation.

The manager is focused on further developing a shared understanding of teaching practice that is informed by current thinking and best practice in early childhood education.

Assessment, planning, and evaluation processes need strengthening. Recent developments to these processes have the potential to better respond to parents' and whānau aspirations, and make children’s learning more visible in the planned programme.

Review processes are well established. They have been used to make decisions about improving aspects of teaching and learning. Strengthening self review and evaluation for improvement is a next step.

Key Next Steps

ERO and centre members agree that they should investigate ways to further strengthen:

  • assessment planning and evaluation practices
  • understanding and consistent use of high quality teaching practices
  • self review through greater emphasis on evaluation against shared criteria or indicators.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Jumpstart Preschool Rimu will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

13 August 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

New Plymouth

Ministry of Education profile number

50129

Licence type

Education and Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

65 children, including 15 aged up to 2

Service roll

72

Gender composition

Girls 38

Boys 34

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Cook Island Māori

18

53

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

June 2014

Date of this report

13 August 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.