Active Discoverers Educare

Education institution number:
46338
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
33
Telephone:
Address:

4 Brownlee Avenue, Ngaruawahia

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Active Discoverers Educare - 18/06/2020

1 Evaluation of Active Discoverers Educare

How well placed is Active Discoverers Educare to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Active Discoverers Educare is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Active Discoverers Educare is a privately-owned centre located in Ngāruawāhia. It is licensed to provide education and care from 7.30am until 5.30pm for 45 children from birth to school age, including 10 up to the age of two years. The current roll of 34 children includes 20 who identify as Māori. The centre runs two aged-based rooms, one for those under two and one for those over two years.

The owner and staff have a commitment to equitable opportunities for all children to attend and participate. This is achieved through the provision of a van service to pick up and drop off children to the centre.

Since the previous ERO review in 2016 a new centre manager has been appointed and all teachers are new to their roles.

The centre philosophy prioritises the delivery of a stimulating, quality learning environment based on whanaungatanga, tuakana-teina, and manaakitanga in a safe and welcoming environment.

The Review Findings

Positive and affirming relationships between teachers, children and their families are strongly evident. Children are well engaged in a range of activities and in sustained play. They have the opportunity to be involved in decisions that affect them. Leaders and teachers should consider ways to extend the provision of resourcing and deliberate provocations to build complexity in children’s learning.

Children experience an inclusive and supportive environment. Children up to the age of two experience respectful interactions in a calm and settled environment. They have opportunities to lead their own learning. Teachers take every opportunity to engage and interact with children and babies to support and extend their learning. Children with additional needs and their families are well supported.

Children benefit from a programme that is responsive to their interests and needs. They participate in authentic learning experiences linked to the local community. Bicultural contexts for learning along with tikanga and te reo Māori are naturally integrated and affirm the language, culture and identity of Māori children. Assessment and planning reflect children’s interests and involvement in meaningful learning activities. The development of teachers’ knowledge and confidence in using the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, should further support individualised planning and assessment.

Children’s learning and care needs are supported by a positive and collaborative team approach to leadership. Shared practice in relation to developing children’s skills in social competence is evident centre wide. The centre manager is providing leadership and is role modelling the integration of tikanga and te reo Māori. She is effectively liaising with local community groups and has identified the need to further develop relationships with local iwi.

Centre and community events encourage and support parents to be involved. Open and reciprocal communication with families provides opportunities to build relationships that support each child's learning and progress.

Governance provides support for leadership to enable positive outcomes for children. Clear roles and responsibilities contribute the smooth operation of the centre. The actively involved owner shares the development of policy and compliance procedures with the centre manager. The recently reviewed philosophy has been developed in collaboration with teachers and whānau. Short-term planning for the centre is detailed. Management recognise the need to further develop the strategic plan to more specifically focus on outcomes for children. Staff are well supported to access multiple opportunities for professional learning and development to build capability, either as individuals or collectively.

Key Next Steps

Key next steps include:

  • developing comprehensive strategic planning, and a shared understanding of centre priorities

  • leaders and teachers undertaking professional learning and development about Te Whāriki in order to strengthen assessment, planning and evaluation

  • developing quality internal evaluation practices to improve outcomes for all children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Active Discoverers Educare completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

To improve compliance practice, the service needs to strengthen its performance in the following areas:

  • documented risk management for all excursions including travel in the centre van

  • parental acknowledgment of the administration of medicine

  • ensure that all teaching staff are regularly appraised.

[Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS17, HS28, GMA7].

During the onsite phase of the review the service provided ERO with evidence that shows the centre has addressed risk management for excursions.

The centre has also provided copies of forms that include parental acknowledgement of the administration of medicine.

Darcy Te Hau

Acting Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region - Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

18 June 2020

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Ngāruawāhia

Ministry of Education profile number

46338

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

34

Gender composition

Female 17 Male 17

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

20
9
5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2020

Date of this report

18 June 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2016

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

Active Discoverers Educare - 05/05/2016

1 Evaluation of Active Discoverers Educare

How well placed is Active Discoverers Educare to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Active Discoverers Educare is a new all day education and care service nestled under the Hikemata Hills in Ngāruawāhia. It operates two age group for infants and children over two years of age. There are opportunities for the age groups to come together during the day and they share the outside play area. It is privately owned and led by a centre manager and two team leaders.

The owner and centre staff have a commitment providing equitable opportunities for all children to participate and attend the centre. This is achieved through providing a van for pick up and drop off to the centre.

Since the service opened there have been considerable developments in all centre operations and to the physical environment. This is the centre's ERO review.

The Review Findings

Children and their families are warmly greeted into a positive environment where they enjoy respectful and trusting relationships with centre staff. Teachers place importance on getting to know children and their families well. Māori values of manakitanga and whanaungatanga underpin the centre culture and this strongly supports children and whānau sense of belonging. Positive relationships help children to settle quickly and contributes to a calm atmosphere that nurtures and supports their well being.

Children confidently explore the centre's interesting and challenging resources and equipment through play. The local environment is also used to encourage learning through trips that promote hands on discovery. Babies, toddlers and young children are able to spend time together in the shared outside play area. This enables siblings to spend time with one another and enjoy tuakana-teina relationships where children accept leadership responsibilities and can support and learn from one another.

Regular excursions in the Hakarimata Hills located behind the centre, as well as visits to the local Marae provide children with additional, authentic and meaningful learning Te Ao Māori experiences. Teachers and children network with other early childhood services in Ngāruawāhia through their participation in a community initiative designed to promote physical activity.

Children learn in a rich range of curriculum areas where they have fun and experience success. The bicultural intent of Te Whāriki (the early childhood curriculum) is being enacted by the service. Te reo and tikanga Māori concepts are naturally integrated throughout the daily programme. Literacy and mathematical concepts are also naturally included into children's interests and play.

Infants and toddlers benefit from teachers who are highly responsive to their care needs. The daily programme and children's individual routines are unrushed, creating a calm, stress-free atmosphere for play and learning.

Cultural diversity is embraced by staff. Māori children are valued as tangata whenua, and all cultures of children at the centre are respected and affirmed by teachers who seek to understand, embrace and celebrate cultural difference.

Teachers are actively involved in children's play and learning. They are skilled at noticing, recognising and responding to children's interests and well-being. Teachers view children as capable and encourage them to be involved in decisions that affect them and empower them to make informed choices. Intentional teaching strategies also build on children's play and support them to problem solve and think critically about their learning.

Children's social skills are fostered through their interactions and friendships with others. Teachers effectively support children's social development through modelling language and positive ways of communicating.

Teachers view children holistically and understand the importance of them learning in the context of family and community. Parents and whānau involvement in the centre life and events is welcomed and encouraged by staff. Some families have shared aspects of their culture and language to further support the education of all children. Teachers have established open communication with whānau who appreciate the opportunity to attend social events. Child portfolios share and celebrate children's success in learning and development over time and parents are invited to contribute to these useful records.

The service owner, centre manager and teachers work as a collaborative team. They have processes in place to reflect on their practice and continually review ways to improve all aspects of centre operations.

Key Next Steps

ERO affirms the centres' identified next steps for development in their strategic and self-review information which documents the intent to:

  • strengthen assessment and planning
  • build on te reo and tikanga Māori practices.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Active Discoverers Educare completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Active Discoverers Educare will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

5 May 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Ngāruawāhia

Ministry of Education profile number

46338

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

48

Gender composition

Girls 27 Boys 21

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Cook Island

Other

30

14

3

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2016

Date of this report

5 May 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

No previous ERO reports

 

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.