Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3

Education institution number:
46308
Service type:
Homebased Network
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
21
Telephone:
Address:

112 Morris Spence Avenue, Onekawa, Napier

View on map

Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3

1 ERO’s Judgements

Akarangi | Quality Evaluation evaluates the extent to which this early childhood service has the learning and organisational conditions to support equitable and excellent outcomes for all learners. Te Ara Poutama Indicators of quality for early childhood education: what matters most are the basis for making judgements about the effectiveness of the service in achieving equity and excellence for all learners. Judgements are made in relation to the Outcomes Indicators, Learning and Organisational Conditions. The Evaluation Judgement Rubric derived from the indicators, is used to inform ERO’s judgements about this service’s performance in promoting equity and excellence.

ERO’s judgements for Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3 are as follows:

Outcome Indicators

(What the service knows about outcomes for learners)


Whāngai Establishing

Ngā Akatoro Domains

 

Learning Conditions

Organisational Conditions

Whāngai Establishing

Whāngai Establishing

2 Context of the Service

Previously known as Bright Futures Hastings 1, this is one of three services governed by Napier Family Centre. Homes are situated in Napier and Hastings. Approximately half of enrolled children are Māori and a small number are of Pacific heritage. Significant staff and leadership changes have occurred since the 2018 ERO report.

3 Summary of findings

Respectful relationships clearly underpin the service’s operation. Intentional strategies are used to establish and foster relationships between visiting teachers, educarers, children and their whānau. A range of services provided by Napier Family Centre are accessed to support children with additional learning needs. Children’s wellbeing and sense of security are nurtured.

Visiting teachers and educarers are in the early stages of responding to children’s cultural identities. Te reo Māori and celebrations such as Matariki and Pacific language weeks are promoted at playgroups and through resource packs provided to educarers. Some children hear and see aspects of their culture in educarers’ homes.

Children benefit from a curriculum that is responsive to their interests. Assessment information is affirming, celebrating relationships and children’s participation in the programme. Visiting teachers and educarers are building their understanding of how the learning outcomes in Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, are used in assessment. Assessment information does not yet reliably:

  • identify learning progress over time

  • draw on parents’ knowledge and contributions to inform the curriculum

  • reflect children’s cultural context or include culturally valued knowledges and attributes.

Significant staff changes have impacted on the service’s capacity to undertake evaluation for improvement and progress other key next steps identified in the 2015 and 2018 ERO reports. A strategic plan, recently reviewed philosophy and newly developed professional growth cycle, prioritise the wellbeing and learning of children. Leaders and visiting teachers are not yet aware of how improvement actions or the enacted curriculum are helping them to achieve their priorities for children’s learning.

4 Improvement actions

Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3 will include the following actions in its Quality Improvement Planning:

  • Leaders and visiting teachers will develop and implement a shared commitment and clear expectations of culturally responsive practices.

  • Draw on knowledge of children’s cultures to inform how visiting teachers and educarers assess and plan for children’s learning and show progress in relation to the learning outcomes in Te Whāriki.

  • Engage in professional learning that builds leaders’ and visiting teachers’ understanding of the purpose of evaluation, and their capability to do and use evaluation for improvement.

  • Implement the newly developed professional growth cycle for visiting teachers.

5 Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3 completed an ERO Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; safety checking; teacher registration; ratios)

  • relevant evacuation procedures and practices.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)
Central Region | Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

10 November 2022 

6 About the Early Childhood Service

Early Childhood Service Name

Bright Futures Hawkes Bay 3

Profile Number

46308

Location

Onekawa, Napier

Service type

Home-based service

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 80 aged under 2

Service roll

43

Review team on site

September 2022

Date of this report

10 November 2022

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, February 2018; Education Review, March 2015

Bright Futures Hastings 1 - 27/02/2018

1 Evaluation of Bright Futures Hastings 1

 

How well placed is Bright Futures Hastings 1 to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Bright Futures is a community home-based education and care service operating under the governance of the Napier Family Centre. Educarers are available for children aged from birth to five years. This is a quality funded network licensed for 80 children and includes 80 up to two years old. Of the 33 children currently enrolled, seven are Māori and 11 are of Pacific heritage.

The recently reviewed philosophy emphasises the importance of relationships, community connections and supporting children's identity and culture.

There are four Bright Futures home-based education and care networks. These operate in Napier, Hastings and Central Hawkes Bay. A service manager is responsible for oversight of these services and oversees the work of visiting teachers. She reports to the Napier Family Centre chief executive officer (CEO) and board of governors.

Two qualified visiting teachers have responsibility for this network. Their role is to support educarers to implement suitable early learning programmes for children in their homes. They also provide community playgroups in Flaxmere and Hastings that many educarers and children attend.

Since the March 2014 ERO report, there have been significant changes in the management team, including the appointment of a new home-based service manager and the disestablishment of the divisional manager role. The service manager now undertakes the duties and responsibilities of this position alongside the manager of the Napier Family Centre Sunny Days service.

The previous ERO report identified areas for network improvements in: self review; educarer development; parent partnership; bicultural practice; and provision for children up to the age of two. Good progress has been made in these areas. Key next steps for governance around strategic planning, curriculum leadership and appraisals have also advanced.

This review is one of a cluster of three home-based network reviews in the Bright Futures service. 

The Review Findings

Children engage in a curriculum mostly based on their interests. They have plentiful opportunities to revisit and extend their learning. A range of experiences grows children’s knowledge of the world around them. Excursions into the community offer an extension to the programme.

Bright Futures playgroups give children and educarers the opportunity to form relationships with a wide range of children and access resources not always offered in the home. Visiting teachers should consider how they can better use this time to develop educarers' skills and knowledge. Documentation of playgroup planning, assessment and evaluation that is responsive to children's interests requires further strengthening.

Resources provided by educarers promote infant, toddlers and young children’s engagement in learning. Visiting teachers identify and supply additional resources to enable challenge and extension of children’s interests.

Infants and toddlers are well supported to achieve success in a mixed age environment. Visiting teachers and educarers carefully consider how to fully engage them in the daily programme. Educarers work with parents to ensure children's wellbeing is maintained through daily transitions.

Good relationships with parents are evident. Educarers regularly communicate with parents and whānau about their child’s progress and wellbeing. Some educarers use online services to share children's learning journeys with parents and whānau.  Visiting teachers inform parents of their children's progress after each home visit. It is timely to evaluate the effectiveness of the current system to promote learning partnerships with parents and whānau.

Visiting teacher reports and observations effectively reinforce assessment, planning and evaluation of individual children. Profile books record children's participation in activities, interests and progression of learning over time. The inclusion of visiting teacher observations, photographs and links to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, assists with the assessment of learning.

To further strengthen assessment, planning and evaluation, visiting teachers should ensure educarers:

  • regularly gather, record and respond to parent aspirations for their child’s learning and development
  • plan for and make visible connections to children’s culture, language and identity.

Educarers are well supported by visiting teachers. Regular visits provide useful ongoing feedback and opportunities to increase their knowledge of children’s learning. Recent changes to visiting teacher reports have increased the focus on key parts of the service philosophy. Educarers use this information to inform their programme and progress children's learning over time.

Management has identified that strengthening the bicultural curriculum is a next step. ERO's evaluation affirms this development. Visiting teachers and educarers require further support to deepen their knowledge and understanding of te ao Māori and how this can be meaningfully integrated within the home based context. Management should also consider how to better reflect the bicultural context of the service in guiding documents.

Developing adults’ confidence and capability to promote educational success for Māori is ongoing. Participation in community initiatives provides opportunities for visiting teachers to explore ways to achieve this.

Pacific children benefit from educarers that respond to their culture, language and identity. The Pacific project recently undertaken by the Hastings team has developed closer relationships between educarers, Pacific parents and local schools.

Self review contributes to improvements at all levels of the organisation. Spontaneous self review within the network is responsive to the needs of educarers and children. A key next step is to continue to increase understanding and use of internal evaluation to:

  • include clear, measurable indicators that align to the evaluative focus
  • monitor and evaluate how changes have impacted on outcomes for children.

Visiting teachers are encouraged to develop areas of the curriculum and service operation. Ongoing opportunities for professional learning are focused on the organisation’s strategic goals. Regular meetings provide collegial discussion. Appraisal allows teachers to set goals for growth that relate to the needs of the service. Further improvements to the appraisal process are required to meet Education Council expectations.

The strategic plan is clearly focused on outcomes for children. Increased representation of Bright Futures Home Based Childcare and Learning on the Napier Family Centre Executive Board has resulted in a clearer alignment of strategic direction between levels of the governing organisation.

Systems and policies that guide operation continue to be developed. These are regularly reviewed in collaboration with educarers and parents. Health and safety in homes is monitored through spot checks by visiting teachers. Steps to improve quality assurance have been taken. These should be further developed to ensure more timely monitoring of documentation and actions required.

Key Next Steps

ERO has identified that leaders and visiting teachers should continue to develop and strengthen:

  • implementation of the bicultural curriculum
  • assessment, planning and evaluation that responds to individual children’s whānau and culture
  • understanding and use of internal evaluation
  • appraisal for staff.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Bright Futures Hastings 1 completed an ERO Home-based Education and Care Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration. 

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

To improve current practice, the service manager should:

  • ensure systems and processes to monitor educarers' health and safety records are consistently applied.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Bright Futures Hastings 1 will be in three years.

Alan Wynyard
Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

27 February 2018 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Home-based Education and Care Service

Location

Hastings

 

Ministry of Education profile number

46308

 

Institution type

Homebased Network

 

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

 

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 80 aged under 2

 

Service roll

33

 

Standard or Quality Funded

Quality

 

Gender composition

Boys 19, Girls 14

 

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Samoan
Other ethnic groups

  7
10
14
  2

 

Number of qualified coordinators in the network

2

 

Required ratios of staff educators to children

Under 2

1:2

 

Over 2

1:4

 

Review team on site

January 2018

 

Date of this report

27 February 2018

 

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

March 2015

 

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to the draft methodology for ERO reviews in Home-based Education and Care Services: July 2014

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service. 

Bright Futures Hastings 1 - 20/03/2015

Evaluation of Bright Futures Hastings 1

How well placed is Bright Futures Hastings 1 to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Bright Futures operates under the umbrella of the Napier Family Centre, a not-for-profit community based organisation which offers a range of support services in Hawkes Bay.

There are six Bright Futures home-based education and care networks. These operate in Napier, Hastings and Central Hawkes Bay. An early childhood education manager is responsible for oversight of these services. She reports to the Napier Family Centre chief executive officer (CEO) and board of governors and oversees the work of visiting teachers. Their role is to support educarers implement suitable early learning programmes for children in their homes. The CEO, manager and one of the visiting teacher have been appointed to their present roles since the 2011 ERO review.

Bright Futures Hastings 1 is a newly-licensed service which operates alongside Bright Futures Hastings 2. This is its first ERO review. The two visiting teachers and a large proportion of the educarers and children enrolled are of Samoan descent. One of the visiting teachers is a fluent Samoan language speaker. The service supports a community playgroup, Fanau mo a Taeao, which many of the educarers in Flaxmere attend.

This review is one of a cluster of three home-based network reviews in the Bright Futures umbrella organisation. The other three Bright Futures home-based services were reviewed in October 2014. In these reviews ERO identified the need for a stronger focus on long-term planning and reviewing the effectiveness of practices to sustain and improve outcomes for children.

The Review Findings

Children participate in a wide range of learning experiences in educarers’ homes and the local community. Many attend playgroups, excursions, gym and music sessions which provide new challenges and opportunities for socialisation. Children's emerging mathematical and literacy skills are fostered through their play. Experiences of Samoan language and culture are integral to the programme for Samoan children. Bright Futures provides a variety of equipment and resources to support educarers implement care and education programmes.

Provision for children aged up-to-two years is carefully considered. Visiting teachers have identified the need to further develop learning programmes for children in this age group.

Visiting teachers and management articulate the importance of valuing children’s cultures, languages and identities, and developing partnerships with parents. This continued emphasis should contribute to practices that acknowledge and support children’s success as learners in their own culture and better identify and meet family and community needs. Teachers acknowledge that the development of a more bicultural curriculum needs to be a continuing focus.

Relevant information is made available for educarers and parents to support children’s transition to primary school. Teachers agree that they need to continue to support educarers to build rapport with local schools and to increase their knowledge about the links between primary and early childhood programmes.

Visiting teachers promote an appropriate focus on child-led learning in homes and at Bright Futures’ playgroups. Their visit notes provide rich records of children’s experiences, developing interests and aspects of their learning. Photographs of playgroup activities provide good information for parents and opportunities for children to reflect on their learning. A service-wide review of assessment continues. Teachers are aware of the need to better promote educarers’ understanding of children’s learning linked to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, and to improve support for them to recognise and respond to learning. Regular evaluation of the programme is not yet undertaken. The recently developed philosophy should provide a suitable basis for this.

Visiting teachers demonstrate high levels of commitment to their roles and support for each other. Access to professional development is strengthening aspects of their practice. They seek and value feedback from management, educarers and parents to inform decisions about their roles and development planning for the network.

Significant time is allocated to supporting educarers with English as a second language to settle into the service and understand early childhood education and service requirements. The manager should continue to seek ways of providing teachers with effective, constructive feedback that promotes continual improvement to their practice. The recently revised teachers' appraisal process aims to better support teacher development. This is not yet fully implemented.

The understanding and use of self review is developing. Recent professional development is supporting teachers to investigate their practice to improve outcomes for children. Using the review framework in a more defined way that helps determine the quality and effectiveness of specific aspects of their work, is a next step.

It is timely, with new managers in place, for the board to plan for improved governance, management and leadership for this service. The identification of strategic goals, more closely linked to outcomes for children, should provide a basis for planned self review and enhanced reporting to the board. More clearly defined expectations around curriculum leadership and management roles and responsibilities, and improved processes for policy development and review should support more consistent practice at all levels of the service. Quality assurance processes require development.

Key Next Steps

Managers should continue development and embedding of practices that build capability and sustainable practice at all levels and result in consistently high quality outcomes for children.

At governance level, priorities are the development of: a strategic plan with quality outcomes identified; more clearly defined expectations around curriculum leadership; and the manager’s and teachers’ appraisal process.

At network level, priorities are the development of: visiting teachers’ understanding and use of review to evaluate the quality of practice; continued and effective support for educators to improve their understanding of early learning and planning suitable programmes for children; parent partnership; bicultural curriculum; and educarers' practice with children aged up-to-two years.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Bright Futures Hastings 1 completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

In order to improve current practice the service provider should ensure:

  • suitably rigorous quality assurance processes are in place in relation to visiting teachers' and educarers' practice
  • systematic procedures for undertaking and recording police vetting are implemented.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Bright Futures Hastings 1 will be in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

20 March 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Napier

Ministry of Education profile number

46308

Licence type

Home-based Network

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 80 aged under 2

Service roll

51

Standard or Quality Funded

Quality funded

Gender composition

Girls 27, Boys 24

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Samoan

Other ethnic groups

5

23

17

6

Number of qualified coordinators in the network

2

Reported ratios of staff educators to children

Under 2

1:2

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:4

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2015

Date of this report

20 March 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

First ERO report

 

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to the draft methodology for ERO reviews in Home-based Education and Care Services: July 2014

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.