Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre

Education institution number:
46201
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
42
Telephone:
Address:

30 Carr Road, Three Kings, Auckland

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1 Evaluation of Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre

How well placed is Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre is set in the industrial area of Three Kings, Auckland. The centre had a change of ownership, and a new teaching team was established in August 2018. The centre is divided into four teaching spaces. Infants and toddlers have separate rooms and there are two rooms for pre-schoolers. The infants and toddlers share a common outdoor play area that supports tuakana/teina relationships. The pre-schoolers also have a communal outdoor play space.

An experienced centre manager leads a team of nine teachers, five of whom are registered. Together with the licensee, she oversees day-to-day centre operations. She is also responsible for the planning and provision of programmes for children.

The curriculum is based on Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, and inspired by Emilio Reggio teaching practices.

The Review Findings

Children are happy and confident in the centre, where their languages and cultures are affirmed. They settle quickly into activities after they and their families are welcomed into the centre each day. While adults share information, children rekindle friendships and move on to investigate provocations that teachers have set up. Teachers interact with children to ensure they are settled, and to encourage them in their play.

The learning environment supports children's learning through exploration and discovery, with a variety of high quality resources. The natural and open-ended resources promote children's creativity and exploration learning opportunities. Children's independence is fostered through many opportunities to make choices, develop self-help skills and use their talents.

Teachers plan activities from observing children's interests. While this approach helps teachers to provide activities that reflect these interests, it does not identify specific teaching strategies or goals to extend children's learning. Teachers would benefit from support to strengthen their understanding of their role in extending children's learning, and developing children's critical thinking skills.

Teachers share learning stories with parents through an online portal. The availability of hard copies has enabled access to these stories for all families, and provides more opportunities for two-way conversations about children and their learning outcomes.

Children up to the age of two years benefit from caring teachers who promote a calm and peaceful environment. Education and care routines are appropriately individualised. Younger children have easy access to the outside area for their own exploration and play with older children.

Leaders have developed good systems to support the effective management and operation of the centre. They work collaboratively with staff to monitor the centre's direction. Leaders plan to incorporate the 2017 revision of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum, and other strategic documents to develop a clearer alignment with valued outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

Centre managers agree that development priorities include:

  • formalising the centre's vision, and aligning the philosophy, the strategic plan and the annual work plan with the vision

  • prioritising whole-centre professional development to build teachers' professional practice and the enactment of the centre's philosophy

  • establishing an organisational culture that supports ongoing improvement

  • ensuring teacher appraisal procedures align with the appraisal policy

  • strengthening internal evaluation.

Since the on-site phase of this ERO review, the service has begun to take steps to address some of these priorities. The director has provided ERO with an action plan that shows how key next steps will be addressed. ERO will request a progress update in six months.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Steve Tanner Director Review and Improvement Services

Northern Region

7 March 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Three Kings, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

46201

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

68 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

48

Gender composition

Girls 25 Boys 23

Ethnic composition

Māori
Indian
Chinese
Pacific groups
other ethnic groups

1
25
12
5
5

Percentage of qualified teachers

50-79%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2019

Date of this report

7 March 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

First ERO report under new name and ownership

Previously known as: Peter Pan Childcare Centre

Education Review

October 2015

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed
  • Well placed
  • Requires further development
  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Peter Pan Childcare Centre Carr Rd

How well placed is Peter Pan Childcare Centre Carr Rd to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Peter Pan Childcare Centre Carr Road is a newly established purpose-built centre located in Three Kings. It is privately owned and part of a growing group of Peter Pan Childcare Centres.

The centre is licensed to provide education and care for up to 68 children from three months to school age. It is organised into four rooms to provide for the different age groups. Infants and toddlers, and pre-schoolers have their own outside area spaces.

The centre’s philosophy is aligned with Reggio Emilia education practices and the principles and strands of Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. It promotes respectful and trusting relationships and encourages a learning programme and environment where children are listened to, respected, valued and feel a sense of belonging.

The centre is governed by the owner operators of Peter Pan Child Care Ltd. Very good systems, procedures and processes are in place to support the operation of the centre. A professional practice mentor supports the centre lead teacher and teachers. The teaching team has fully and provisionally registered teachers.

The majority of children attending are Chinese and Indian. Together with Māori, New Zealand European/Pākehā and Pacific children, they represent the cultural diversity of the centre’s community.

Managers supply healthy, nutritious meals for children. They access support from external agencies to provide for special needs children.

The Review Findings

The attractive and well designed indoor and outdoor environment is pleasing and inviting. Teachers create interesting learning spaces and children have access to high quality, well organised resources.

Children are warmly welcomed into the centre. Teachers recognise the importance of building responsive relationships with children and families. They spend time developing conversations and information sharing.

The youngest children are well cared for in a warm and nurturing environment. Teachers provide children with individualised care throughout the day and support language development through routines and daily happenings. Toddlers are encouraged to develop independence and to make choices in their play. Teachers support children with their language by singing songs at mat and group times.

Children are confident, capable and enjoy exploring the indoor and outdoor environment. They develop an awareness of the community around them through frequent excursions outside the centre. Children's play enhances their social and communication skills through their interactions with peers, in groups and with adults.

Teachers listen carefully to children to find out their strengths, interests and needs. They provide literacy and numeracy through play for children and support and encourage them to develop self-managing skills. Teachers also plan projects to extend the interests of the two older groups of children.

Teachers carry out their own research about children’s current investigations to deepen their understanding about children’s learning. The professional practice mentor has regular meetings with teachers to discuss, assess and plan from children’s interests. She leads by example to build a collaborative professional learning community. Managers are now considering how to promote curriculum leadership opportunities for staff.

Managers agree that the centre’s commitment to The Treaty of Waitangi and bicultural practices could be more visible in the centre’s philosophy. This addition could help teachers to ensure that the identity, language and culture of Māori learners and their whānau is better affirmed.

Managers are deliberate in appointing staff with similar cultures and languages of the children and their families at the centre. They acknowledge the importance of ensuring that children’s cultures and languages are reflected in the centre documents and environment, especially for Māori learners and children from Pacific nations.

Key Next Steps

Managers agree that next steps for the centre include:

  • using Ministry of Education resources to strengthen teachers’ promotion of bicultural practices
  • increasing staff and parent involvement in self review and strengthening the links between self review to the centre’s vision and philosophy to inform the centre's strategic direction.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Peter Pan Childcare Centre Carr Rd completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration. 

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Peter Pan Childcare Centre Carr Rd will be in three years. 

Graham Randell
Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

9 October 2015 

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning. 

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service 

Location

Three Kings, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

46201

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

68 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

75

Gender composition

Boys      39
Girls       36

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Chinese
Indian
Samoan
Tongan

  4
  8
36
22
  3
  2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

9 October 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

No previous ERO reports

 

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.