Kids Pace Education

Education institution number:
45951
Service type:
Homebased Network
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
114
Address:

5 Hall Road, RD3, Alexandra

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1 Evaluation of Kids Pace Education

How well placed is Kids Pace Education to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kids Pace Education is a home-based education and care service. There are sixteen educators providing an in-home education and care service for children across Southland and Central Otago.

The owner, who is also a visiting teacher, is based in Alexandra. She regularly visits the educators and provides support for them. Another visiting teacher is employed, and is currently on maternity leave. Some children and educators have regular opportunities to attend playgroups.

The 2015 ERO report identified many areas that required further development, including areas of governance, leadership, teaching and learning. Some progress has been made in addressing these key areas. Most of these remain as areas for further development.

The Review Findings

Children benefit from close and responsive relationships with their educators. Educators respond well to children's interests, routines and wellbeing. They plan a range of interesting learning experiences to extend children's learning, including visits into their local communities. These factors are contributing to positive outcomes for all children.

Children with particular learning needs are well supported through access to specific support services. Educators, teachers and parents work collaboratively to develop specific strategies and goals to support them to progress in their learning. Children are well supported to develop their communication skills. Educators support children to learn concepts about science, early literacy and mathematics. Infants and toddlers benefit from time to build relationships and develop their physical skills. Educators deliberately plan experiences to support children, in knowing about and understanding aspects of their bicultural heritage. Visiting teachers should continue to support educators to develop their understanding and use of te reo and tikanga Māori.

A clearly-developed vision and philosophy guides the service's practices. Visiting teachers and educators could more clearly show their valued outcomes for children's learning in the service's philosophy. They could then use these priorities for children's learning to guide both individual and group planning.

The visiting teacher has developed useful systems to build educator capabilities and to strengthen the focus on children's learning. These include:

  • a focus on planning and assessment to ensure educators are planning to meet the needs, interests and learning goals of children, both individually and in groups

  • responding to parents' aspirations for their children's learning

  • a focus on promoting bicultural practices

  • supporting educators to develop a better understanding of Te Whāriki (2017)

  • ensuring educators have access to, and are promoting, a range of resources to support children's learning.

The owner/visiting teacher has developed useful strategic planning in consultation with her community, to set key priorities for the service. A short-term plan guides the service operations, however this needs significant development to clearly align to the long-term planned priorities, goals and actions. Progress towards achieving these should be regularly monitored, evaluated and reported on by the owner.

The owner/visiting teacher makes good use of networks to support and build professional connections. She ensures there are regular professional development opportunities and networks to share practices between educators. There are clear expectations and guidelines in place to support the induction of new educators to the service. To further build the capability of both visiting teachers and educators, the owner needs to develop a rigorous appraisal system. This needs to include:

  • the development of clear guidelines for a regular and effective appraisal process

  • specific goals identified for all educators

  • recorded robust feedback to support the development and progress towards the goals

  • strengthening the process for endorsing teacher registration.

The owner/visiting teacher uses internal evaluation to make useful improvements to practices. She needs to continue to develop her understanding and use of evaluative practices, and develop a schedule to ensure all aspects of practice are reviewed over time.

Key Next Steps

The next steps for the service owner, visiting teacher and educators are to:

  • further develop strategic and annual planning

  • develop a rigorous appraisal system

  • continue to develop internal-evaluation processes and practices

  • consistently show how they are extending children's learning

  • continue to support educators in developing their bicultural practices.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kids Pace Education completed an ERO Home-based Education and Care Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Kids Pace Education will be in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

Te Waipounamu - Southern Region

21 June 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Home-based Education and Care Service

Location

Alexandra

Ministry of Education profile number

45951

Institution type

Homebased Network

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 80 aged under 2

Service roll

81

Standard or Quality Funded

Standard

Gender composition

Girls: 43

Boys: 38

Ethnic composition

Māori:
Pākehā:
Pacific:
Other:

9
68
2
2

Number of qualified coordinators in the network

1

Required ratios of staff educators to children

Under 2

1:2

Over 2

1:4

Review team on site

May 2018

Date of this report

21 June 2018

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review:

March 2015

Education Review:

March 2014

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to the draft methodology for ERO reviews in Home-based Education and Care Services: July 2014

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Kids Pace Education

How well placed is Kids Pace Education to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Kids Pace Education is a home-based early childhood network operating in Southland and Central Otago. Parents can choose for their children to be cared for by an educator in the educator’s home or in the child’s own home. There are currently fourteen educators in the service. Those in Winton and Gore meet regularly for playgroups.

The owner is the manager and visiting teacher. Her office is in Alexandra. As visiting teacher, she supports the educators in the care and education they offer to children.

The service opened in 2012. This is its second ERO review. The March 2014 ERO report identified significant concerns about aspects of children’s health and safety, human-resource practices, and support for educators. After that review the Ministry of Education provided support and advice to the service. With that assistance, the manager has now put in place effective systems for monitoring children’s health and safety, improved human-resource practices and better ways to support educators.

The Review Findings

Children in the Kids Pace network benefit from a variety of interesting learning experiences. These reflect the special character of home-based care and education, and include small-group play, real-life activities like gardening, and outings in the local community.

The visiting teacher visits all educators regularly. She has developed a high level of trust with them. She uses her visits to talk with educators about children’s care and education and to coach educators to develop their own understanding, skills and confidence. The visiting teacher’s visits to educators would be more useful if they focused more closely on:

  • getting educators to think more deeply about children’s learning
  • working on the service’s identified priorities
  • supporting educators with their individual goals.

The visiting teacher has developed a practical framework for planning for children’s future learning. Her visits to educators are her opportunity to work with educators to put these plans together. She provides helpful advice to educators about activities for infants and toddlers.

The visiting teacher uses a wide range of ways to communicate with parents about their child’s learning. She and the educators gather parents’ wishes for their children. They should now find ways to make more use of these when planning future learning experiences for children.

Some educators provide children with worthwhile experiences that include Māori perspectives and cultural values. The visiting teacher has identified that this is an area she needs to support educators, so that it becomes part of the curriculum for all children.

The visiting teacher plans professional development events for the educators and useful resources to guide them in their interactions with children. Educators are committed to attending the professional development events.

The manager is very receptive to new ideas to help improve the service. She has worked collaboratively with the educators to put in place the improvements since the 2014 ERO review. It is important for the manager to maintain and strengthen her professional connections so that she is not isolated in her role.

There are effective systems in place for ensuring the day-to-day safety of children in the homes. The manager has put in place an appraisal process for the educators, but this is yet to be fully developed. Her own appraisal would benefit from comment on her performance from the people she works with.

Key Next Steps

Governance 

A long-term/strategic plan would help the manager identify and attain the priorities for the service. It could align existing activities such as appraisal, visiting teacher visits and reports, professional development and learning, self review and annual planning to the service’s priorities.

The manager should further develop her understanding and implementation of self review. In particular she should use multiple sources of information, including perspectives from different people, to inform the self-review findings.

Management

The manager should:

  • strengthen educators’ induction, ongoing support and coaching
  • further develop the appraisal system and focus it on individual educator development and the service’s priorities.
Curriculum, learning and teaching 

The visiting teacher should:

  • provide a greater focus on children’s learning through offering consistent high-quality coaching and support for educators
  • consistently use the monthly visit form to comment on educators’ practice and what educators can do to improve outcomes for children.

The manager has identified and ERO agrees that:

  • educators could use Te Whāriki (the early childhood curriculum) more consistently
  • parents’ aspirations for their children’s learning should be more consistently gathered and incorporated into children’s learning plans
  • educators’ knowledge and confidence to deliver a bicultural curriculum for all children should be increased.
Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Kids Pace Education completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Kids Pace Education will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

27 March 2015

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Alexandra

Ministry of Education profile number

45951

Licence type

Home Based network

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 80 aged under 2

Service roll

45

Gender composition

Girls 18

Boys 27

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

European

Asian

1

39

3

2

Number of qualified coordinators in the network

1

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:2

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:4

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

February

Date of this report

27 March 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

March 2014

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.