Maungatapu Pre-School

Education institution number:
45535
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
56
Telephone:
Address:

313 Maungatapu Road, Maungatapu-Tauranga, Tauranga

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1 Evaluation of Maungatapu Pre-School

How well placed is Maungatapu Pre-School to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Maungatapu Pre-School is located in the suburb of Maungatapu, Tauranga. The centre is licensed for 45 children, including 15 under two years of age. The centre has been open since 2010 and is privately owned. The current roll of 55 includes seven children who identify as Māori and eight from a range of cultural heritages. The majority of staff are qualified early childhood teachers.

The centre philosophy promotes building a sense of community and children to develop a strong sense of belonging. Teachers and leaders are supportive of the Treaty of Waitangi and integrate te reo Māori into the daily programme. Since the last review there has been a focus on developing self review and greater parental involvement. There has been further development of the appraisal process and increasing teacher expectations about delivering quality care and learning for children.

The Review Findings

Strong, responsive, reciprocal and respectful relationships are formed with each family, supporting children’s sense of belonging. Assessment, planning and evaluation are responsive to children’s emerging interests, strengths and needs. A feature of the centre is the high teacher-to-child ratio that allows for high levels of care and supervision. Teachers recognise the importance of play as a vehicle for learning. Children have easy access to an environment that is well resourced and encourages exploration, fosters children’s curiosity and encourages risk taking.

Teachers use a range of effective strategies to respond to all children. They value and encourage aspirations for children and the use of positive guidance practices are well embedded and consistently enacted. Nurturing and respectful interactions between teachers and children are highly evident with children’s independence and choice encouraged. Transition into, through and out of the centre is highly effective. A purposely planned approach is responsive to the individual child’s interests and readiness for learning in collaboration with whānau.

The service builds teacher capability to sustain and improve quality outcomes for children. Evidence of ongoing self review and planned inquiry have led to strengthening in teacher practice. Systems and procedures have been reviewed and refined to ensure children’s emotional and physical wellbeing. The appraisal system reflects the centre's direction with links to professional learning and development for teachers. This responds to teachers' professional needs and allows them to evaluate their practice and improve positive outcomes for children.

Leadership has built a highly positive and collaborative culture where leaders and teachers feel valued and respected. They embrace the unique position of te ao Māori with a high level of commitment to bicultural practice visible. Māori children benefit from this environment. Leaders and teachers ensure their practices reflect the rights of all children to a quality, inclusive early childhood education. Professional leadership opportunities are responsive to individual teachers' needs and areas of interest. Leaders are focused on improving the quality of education and care through ongoing systematic self review. Leaders strongly advocate for infants, toddlers and young children and their whānau.

Children under the age of two enjoy a calm and unhurried environment that provides the space and time for them to lead their learning.

There is a well-considered approach to supporting children with additional needs. Strong relationships with external agencies have been developed and this supports parents, whānau and children. Staff take full responsibility for the education and care of children with special learning needs, ensuring that they participate fully in all aspects of the programme alongside their peers. The centre has an inclusive and collaborative approach with centre-wide support.

Key Next Steps

Ongoing priority for the service is to review and align the philosophy to the expectations of Te Whariki. This should assist leaders and teachers to develop a shared understanding of the values and beliefs that underpin teaching and learning.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Maungatapu Pre-School completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Maungatapu Pre-School will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

18 June 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Maungatapu, Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45535

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

55

Gender composition

Girls 31 Boys 24

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Pacific
Other

7
37
6
5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:2

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

May 2018

Date of this report

18 June 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2015

Education Review

August 2012

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Maungatapu Pre-School

How well placed is Maungatapu Pre-School to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Maungatapu Pre-School is a purpose built education and care service located in suburban Tauranga and licensed for 45 children, including 15 aged up to two year. The roll at the time of this ERO review was 63 including 16 who are identified as Māori. The centre is privately owned and opens from 7.30 am to 5.30 pm Monday to Friday. Both centre owners work alongside teachers during the day and all are qualified early childhood teachers or in training. The service opened in 2010. Centre leaders responded positively to the recommendations from their 2012 ERO report by making significant enhancements to self-review processes and practices.

The centre operates two areas, one for babies/toddlers up to two years and another for children from three years to school age. Centre leaders ensure that the ratio of qualified staff to children is above Ministry of Education requirements. Healthy meals and snacks are provided by the centre and they are responsive to children’s specific dietary requirements.

The Maungatapu Pre-School philosophy aims to promote a child’s sense of belonging, build self confidence and esteem, and promote children as independent thinkers and learners. The service also prioritises respect for the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi and acknowledge tangata whenua by integration of tikanga and te reo Māori throughout the programme. The owners have a commitment to bicultural practices and have established close links with local hapu, mārae and kaumātua.

The Review Findings

Children and their parents are warmly welcomed into the centre each day, and parents expressed high levels of satisfaction with the standard of education and care. The learning environments are carefully planned by teachers to invite children’s interests and provide many opportunities for exploration and play.

As a result of a recent programme review, specific areas have been set up throughout the centre to ensure that all learning areas are visible and easily accessed by children. Literacy and mathematical learning are integrated throughout children’s play, and relevant displays allow children ongoing opportunities to explore and extend their interests. A feature of the centre is the planned exposure of children to print, number and scientific concepts with te reo Māori integrated naturally into the programme. ERO observed children engaged in sustained play in a calm, settled environment.

The daily programme experienced by children is an effective combination of teacher-led and child-initiated learning. Teachers skilfully notice and respond to children’s interests by engaging them in conversations and extending their oral language and ideas. Independence is fostered by deliberately building children’s ability to take responsibility for self-care routines and their own belongings.

There are multiple opportunities for parents and whānau to contribute to the programme and share their aspirations for their child’s learning and development. The transition to school process is effectively managed, and parents appreciate the information they receive from the service. The programme also includes frequent excursions into the local community, swimming and music sessions, and outings to a nearby park. Teachers work in partnership with parents to provide an inclusive education and care for children with high and complex special needs.

A high quality programme of education and care is evident for babies and toddlers who experience flexible routines, nurturing, and respectful relationships with teachers. Teachers interpret and respond to subtle non-verbal cues offered by babies, to build high levels of confidence and trust between teachers and young children. Baby sign language is used to enrich communication skills.

Teachers record important episodes of learning in electronic portfolios which are accessible to parents and whānau at the centre and online in children’s homes. These portfolios include photographs, videos and narratives that document the learning that is occurring, and making clear links to Te Whāriki, the early childhood curriculum. An important next step is to review learning stories to ensure learning behaviours (dispositional learning) and developmental stages are increasingly included in children’s learning stories, and made explicit to parents and whānau so they can support learning at home.

The owners are providing strong leadership for the direction and development of the service. There are high levels of collaboration and trust amongst the teaching team, and shared responsibility for promoting positive outcomes for children and their families. The owners and teachers have established positive, respectful and reciprocal relationships with parents and whānau.

Key Next Steps

Centre leaders have identified the need to build on:

  • processes that enable parents to be more effectively involved in self review
  • teacher appraisals to ensure a rich evidence base including documented observations of teaching practice in relation to their goals, and specific feedback and feed forward, to improve outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Maungatapu Pre-School completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Maungatapu Pre-School will be in three years.

Dale Bailey Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

30 June 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45535

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

63

Gender composition

Girls 36 Boys 27

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Other

16

46

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:5

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

April 2015

Date of this report

30 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2012

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.