BestStart Welcome Bay

Education institution number:
45045
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
53
Telephone:
Address:

166 Welcome Bay Road, Welcome Bay, Tauranga

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1 Evaluation of BestStart Welcome Bay

How well placed is BestStart Welcome Bay to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

BestStart Welcome Bay is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

BestStart Welcome Bay is situated in Welcome Bay, Tauranga and is licensed for 50 children, including 14 children up to the age of two years. At the time of this review, 57 children were enrolled and 19 are Māori. There has been a small decline in the centre roll since the January 2016 ERO report. The purpose-built centre provides all-day education and care in two age-based rooms.

The centre philosophy states that 'each child is respected and empowered as a unique individual'. Teachers recognise that all children learn at their own pace and through many different avenues, including play, first-hand experiences, modelling, imitation and interactions with adults and the environment.

Since the previous ERO review, the centre has had a name change from TopKids Welcome Bay Rd, to BestStart Welcome Bay. The development of a new leadership structure has included the appointment of a new centre manager and assistant manager. A professional service manager and business manager provide support for the centre.

This service is operated by BestStart, a charitable organisation owned by the Wright Family Foundation. Since the previous ERO report, a new chief executive officer has been appointed. Regional and local professional service and business managers oversee the Central North Island BestStart centres. Their vision is to work with families, whānau, teacher and communities to enable children to achieve their learning potential.

This review is part of a cluster of 15 in the BestStart organisation.

The centre belongs to the Tauranga Peninsula Kāhui Ako.

The Review Findings

The importance of children learning through play is recognised and valued by teachers. Reference to children's individual development goals is strengthening teachers' planning and assessment practices to support learning. Curriculum areas of play are well resourced. Teachers foster children's independence, social skills and respond to their interests. Centre managers express a continued focus on promoting children's emotional competency in the programme. ERO's evaluation affirms this ongoing priority.

Children with additional needs are well supported in an inclusive environment. Teachers know and respond to their specific needs. Plans and strategies are developed with whānau, parents and external agencies. Successful transitions are individualised and well supported by effective partnerships between families and teachers. Children’s sense of belonging is nurtured during and after transitions into and within the service.

Teacher are attentive and respond to the needs and rhythms of children up to two years of age. Relationships are respectful and responsive. Children easily access an environment that is well resourced and encourages their exploration.

The new leadership team, in supporting the new teaching team, provides clear direction for the centre. They are developing shared expectations for the education and care of children. Ongoing review is leading to evidence-based decisions. Professional learning development supports teachers' growth and development. Building teacher capability and strengthening the partnership with parents and whānau contributes to positive outcomes for children across the centre. Leaders have established reciprocal and meaningful links with Ngāi Te Rangi iwi to support success for Māori learners.

Strong systems and processes guide centre operation. Internal evaluation is improvement focused and includes ongoing consultation with families and whānau. There is clear alignment between regional strategic direction and centre annual plans. The appraisal process assists teachers to inquire into and strengthen their practice. This process is supported by regular and ongoing coaching and mentoring. Several initiatives to remove barriers to education and support children's wellness, promotes equity in learning opportunities. The organisation's philosophy, vision and goals promote positive learning outcomes for all children.

Key Next Steps

ERO and centre management agree that key next steps are to continue to:

  • strengthen in-depth learning conversations and open-ended questioning to extend children’s thinking

  • build on the use and understanding of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori within the centre.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of BestStart Welcome Bay completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

31 October 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45045

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 14 aged under 2

Service roll

57

Gender composition

Male 31, Female 26

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

19
26
12

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:5

Meets minimum requirements

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2019

Date of this report

31 October 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

January 2016

Education Review

May 2012

Education Review

March 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Topkids Welcome Bay Rd

How well placed is Topkids Welcome Bay Rd to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Topkids Welcome Bay receives comprehensive governance and management support from BestStart Educare Centres (formerly Kidicorp), a charitable trust. BestStart education and care centres have a shared vision, purpose and values, designed to provide positive outcomes for children. This centre’s philosophy is based on building strong and reciprocal relationships, fostering respect and trust amongst family and whānau. The individuality of babies, toddlers and young children is recognised and valued in a supportive nurturing environment for education and care.

Topkids Welcome Bay is a purpose-built centre catering for children from 3 months to five years. There are two age-based rooms: Koru for babies and toddlers and Kahikitia for children over two years. A third room, Kauri is under review from management, but continues to provide a programme for four year olds each morning, using the Be School Ready principles. There is a designated head teacher for the babies and toddlers, and the centre manager leads the programme for the older children. Teachers know the children well and are familiar with their routines.

The centre is licensed for 50 children, including 20 up to the age of two years. The current roll is 66, with children of Māori descent being the predominant ethnicity. The centre provides all-day and sessional care and education for babies, toddlers and young children from 7.30am to 5.30pm.

The centre manager is longstanding in the role and she is responsible for the overall day-to-day management and leadership of the centre. The majority of the teachers are fully qualified. Support staff, including the office administrator and the cook contribute to children’s wellbeing and the smooth running of the centre. Children receive nutritious morning teas and lunches.

Since the 2012 ERO review there has been a significant upgrade of the centre’s outdoor environments for learning. The professional services manager is continuing to work with the centre manager to address the areas identified for development in the 2012 ERO report. These were to strengthen the programme and teaching practices to empower children as learners. Teachers are receiving ongoing professional development, led by the professional services manager in collaboration with the centre manager.

The centre’s recent reporting history with ERO has been positive.

The Review Findings

BestStart Educare Centres has well developed systems to support centre operations, and to promote development. Business and professional services managers provide strong guidance and support to the centre manager. The centre’s strategic plan is reflective of the Trust’s focus on developing environments and leadership capability in ways that are most likely to contribute to positive outcomes for children. The Trust places high priority on the professional learning and development of its staff.

The professional services manager (PSM) is providing well informed professional leadership for the centre. She liaises closely with the centre manager, regularly observes the programme and provides evaluative reports for each teaching team. The PSM recognises that making these reports more explicit would be beneficial for the centre manager and teachers. This should provide them with clear direction, enable them to work collaboratively to review and refine the programme, and build teaching practices that are focussed on children’s learning.

Professional learning and development is ongoing, accessible and relevant for teachers. It is closely aligned with the centre’s developing appraisal process. Teaching staff develop specific and measurable goals. There is an expectation that they will inquire into the effectiveness of their practice, document evidence of their progress, and there are ongoing opportunities for teachers to meet with their appraiser and share examples of good teaching practice. When fully implemented the centre' appraisal process is likely to bring about high levels of professional growth for leaders, teachers and support staff.

Teachers are committed to the development of trusting and reciprocal relationships. These are well developed and highly evident in the life of the centre. Parent voice is highly valued. Leaders and teachers are increasingly seeking different ways to connect with family/whānau to engage them in their children’s early education and care. The use of digital technology to involve and inform parents is a recent development. Leaders acknowledge the need for further parent in its use. Teachers find daily opportunities to talk with parents and share important information about their children’s care and wellbeing.

Teachers know children and their families well. They are vigilant and responsive to children’s care needs and respond to the cues and non-verbal language of babies and toddlers. Practice is respectful of children’s individual differences and the centre manager is modelling an inclusive approach to children with special needs.

The centre manager, with support from the PSM, is working collaboratively with teaching staff to develop a more learner-centred curriculum. Features of the current curriculum are:

  • the priority placed on developing children’s social competencies
  • the focus on developing children’s dispositions, in keeping with Te Whariki, the early childhood curriculum
  • the consistent recognition and valuing of the language, culture and identity of Māori children.

Teachers now need to work on recognising the learning that is occurring, and develop responses that are likely to lead to meaningful and sustained play.

The newly developed outdoor environment is designed to support a more learner-centred curriculum/programme, and has engendered a new sense of pride in the centre’s surroundings.

Key Next Steps

Leading the change: The centre manager, professional services and business managers recognise the need to work together and articulate a shared willingness and vision for the way forward as follows:

The centre manager will engage in relevant professional learning and development, and work with teachers to develop their understanding of current best practice for learning and teaching.

The focus areas for development will be closely aligned with teachers’ appraisal goals and inquiries.

The centre manager will lead an inclusive process of curriculum review that affirms what is working well, takes account of parent aspirations, and leads to the development of a programme that is responsive to the emerging interests, needs and abilities of all children.

This change process should build teacher capability to provide more positive learning outcomes for as capable and confident learners.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Topkids Welcome Bay Rd completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Topkids Welcome Bay Rd will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson Deputy Chief Review Officer

27 January 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45045

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

66

Gender composition

Boys 39 Girls 27

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Indian

Other Asian

Other European

32

30

1

1

2

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2015

Date of this report

27 January 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2012

 

Education Review

March 2009

 

Supplementary Review

December 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.