BestStart Tauranga Central

Education institution number:
45040
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
48
Telephone:
Address:

76 13th Avenue, Tauranga South, Tauranga

View on map

1 Evaluation of BestStart Tauranga Central

How well placed is BestStart Tauranga Central to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

BestStart Tauranga Central is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

BestStart Tauranga Central is situated in Tauranga city centre. It is licensed for 44 children, including 14 children up to the age of two years. At the time of this ERO review, 50 children were enrolled and 10 children identify as Māori. A small number from a range of other ethnic groups are also enrolled. The centre provides all-day education and care in two aged-based rooms.

Since the May 2014 ERO evaluation, the centre has changed its name from ABC Tauranga Central to BestStart Tauranga Central. A new centre manager has recently been appointed from within the existing team. There has been significant staff turnover since the previous ERO review.

The recently reviewed philosophy places priority developing strong relationships with children and families. They value family participation to support holistic learning for the child. Staff aim to provide a safe and stimulating environment to promote exploration and learning through play.

The service is operated by BestStart, a charitable organisation owned by the Wright Family Foundation. Since the previous ERO review of this centre, a new chief executive officer has been appointed. Regional and local professional service and business managers oversee the Central North Island BestStart centres. Their vision is to work in partnership with families, whānau, teachers and communities to enable children to achieve their learning potential.

This review was part of a cluster of 15 reviews in the BestStart organisation.

The Review Findings

Children learn in a spacious, well-resourced and purposefully planned environment. They are viewed as competent learners. Their social competence is supported. Literacy, mathematics, science, music, arts and physical challenges are an integral part of the early learning experience. Activities, resources and projects are intentionally provided to add complexity to learning. This supports children to develop working theories about their world and provides challenge. Imagination, problem-solving and creativity are supported. Children are busy explorers, engaged in sustained play.

Children's learning is assessed, planned for and evaluated in portfolios. These are also available online. Individual goals are developed in consultation with children's parents. To further strengthen assessment teachers should ensure that there is consistency in reflecting each child's language, culture and identity and link evidence back to the his/her goal.

Teachers use a range of highly effective teaching techniques to support learners. Strong, responsive and nurturing practices are being developed by the cohesive teaching team with children, their families and each other. Teachers have shared expectations for practice and an agreed philosophy. They skilfully know when to actively engage with children and when to allow them to lead their own learning. Oral language is well supported, including for those with English as a second language. Children with additional learning needs are supported with inclusive practice and teachers working alongside families and external agencies where required. Transitions into, within and on to school are effective and individualised. Children are independent and confident learners.

A shared leadership approach effectively builds capability within the service. Leaders have established reciprocal and meaningful links with Ngāi Te Rangi iwi to support success for Māori learners. The knowledge gained from working with iwi should now be embedded into centre-wide practice. Teachers should continue to strengthen their use of te reo Māori, to further support Māori learners. Pacific children's culture is acknowledged and teachers should continue to explore culturally responsive teaching practices. Regular professional development opportunities are provided for teachers. Children are supported in their learning by knowledgeable teachers.

Strong systems and processes guide centre operation. Internal evaluation is improvement focused and includes ongoing consultation with families and whānau. There is clear alignment between regional strategic direction and centre annual plans. The appraisal process assists teachers to inquire into and strengthen their practice. This process is supported by regular and ongoing coaching and mentoring. Several initiatives to remove barriers to education and support children's wellness, promotes equity in learning opportunities. The organisation's philosophy, vision and goals promote positive learning outcomes for all children.

Key Next Steps

The key next step for BestStart Tauranga Central is to continue to strengthen culturally responsive teaching practice. This should include:

  • developing confidence and skills to increase the use of te reo Māori

  • using the knowledge gained from recent professional development with local iwi to strengthen the localised curriculum

  • consistently capturing individual children's language, culture and identity in assessment.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of BestStart Tauranga Central completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

The service needs to be vigilant about possible physical hazards. Since the onsite phase of the ERO review, the matter of children's safety in relation to a tree close to the boundary fence has been addressed.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services Central

Central Region

1 November 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45040

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

44 children, including up to 14 aged under 2

Service roll

50

Gender composition

Male 36 Female 14

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

10
34
6

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2019

Date of this report

1 November 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

May 2014

Education Review

January 2011

Education Review

April 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of ABC Tauranga Central

How well placed is ABC Tauranga Central to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

ABC Tauranga Central is located in Tauranga and operates under the management umbrella of Kidicorp Ltd. Teachers receive strong ongoing support from the service and business managers. Policies set out explicit expectations and guidelines to support the daily and long-term operations of the centre.

The centre is licensed for 50 over two including 15 up to two years old. The centre provides all day education and care. At the time of the ERO review there were 62 children enrolled, 12 of whom are identified as Māori. A school transition programme called ‘Be School Ready’ helps children familiarise themselves with the school environment.

Since the 2011 ERO review the centre has employed a head teacher for the under two’s area, an administrator and four new teachers. In addition the new owners have redesigned the outside environment and reviewed their philosophy. They have addressed the agreed priority in the 2011 ERO review related to strengthening aspects of teaching practice for older children.

The centre’s philosophy is founded on the following aspirations for children to:

  • grow up as confident and competent communicators
  • experience an environment that supports curiosity and promotes discovery
  • extend their interests through play at their own pace
  • develop safe and trusting relationships.

The Review Findings

Children benefit from extensive opportunities to engage in sustained play and exploration. There is a strong emphasis on fostering independence, social skills and promoting children’s interests. Children’s imagination and creativity is carefully nurtured by teachers promoting problem solving, self expression, and investigation skills in order to develop curiosity about the world around them.

Teachers have a good knowledge of children’s interests and needs, and this information is used to plan responsive programmes and appropriate learning experiences. Children use their imagination and creativity during a wide range of self-directed learning experiences. Teachers provide high-quality programmes and resources that motivate and challenge children.

The head teacher and teachers in the under two’s area are focused on teachable moments and personalised care. They use verbal and non-verbal communication well and support infants to explore and make choices. There is a collaborative and shared approach to leadership by adults in the over two’s area. Older children enjoy a wide range of extracurricular activities and engage in complex play with others.

Teachers, parents and children are encouraged to share their strengths and talents to enrich the curriculum and promote positive learning outcomes. Effective processes for self review are focused on improving outcomes for children. A teacher of Māori in the centre supports the use of Māori language, tikanga and waiata. Māori children’s pepeha is documented in their learning journals and displayed on the bicultural wall. Teachers are now focused on providing more opportunities for families to share their goals and aspirations about their children’s learning and development.

Children’s social competencies are fostered through their relationships with others and the environment. Features of the programme include the extensive opportunities for infants and children to be involved in sustained and complex play. Centre routines are well understood and children develop good social and communication skills. Literacy and mathematics concepts are effectively interwoven into children’s play through meaningful contexts for learning.

Effective leadership by professional service and business managers provide quality education and care, and work collaboratively with the knowledgeable and experienced centre manager. Teachers participate in high-quality centre self-review practices, and their monitoring leads to improving the provision of quality education and care.

Key Next Step

ERO and management agree that the centre’s identified area for review and development is to continue to strengthen the planned bicultural practices, relating to language and tikanga Māori.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of ABC Tauranga Central completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of ABC Tauranga Central will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

1 May 2014

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

45040

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

62

Gender composition

Girls 32

Boys 30

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Indian

Other

12

41

4

5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

1 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

January 2011

 

Education Review

April 2008

 

Supplementary Review (as Haven Preschool)

February 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.