Richmond View School

Education institution number:
421
School type:
Composite
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
302
Telephone:
Address:

26 Burleigh Road, Blenheim

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Richmond View School - 27/04/2017

Summary

Richmond View School is an integrated, inter-denominational school that shares its site with the Blenheim Elim Church. At the time of the review the school provides education for children in Years 1 to 8.

The school roll of 132 has continued to increase over time and includes children from diverse cultures and communities, with 10% of children of Māori descent. There is a growing number of children (13) who are English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). The staff has remained mostly the same since the time of the last review and all have strong connections to the church.

School achievement information shows that children have continued to achieve well over time since 2014. The school responds effectively to children with lower achievement and can show progress in their engagement and learning.

The school has responded positively to addressing the next steps identified in the 2014 ERO report.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school responds effectively to Māori and other children whose learning needs accelerating.

The school has many effective processes and practices that promote achievement of equity and excellence. School leaders have made good use of internal evaluation practices to identify the school’s key priorities for further development. Active participation in the local community of learning is focused on raising achievement, particularly in writing and boys’ engagement.

School leaders and teachers are developing a range of effective ways of engaging children whose progress needs acceleration in meaningful learning. A culture of collaboration between teaching staff and with parents and whānau contributes to positive and respectful relationships.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity and educational outcomes, supported by effective and sustainable processes.

Further developments include strengthening analysis and use of school wide achievement data. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds effectively to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need accelerating.

School leaders and teachers have developed a useful framework for identifying, monitoring and supporting all children’s learning needs. Teachers share ownership for children’s learning and use a range of innovative ways to engage children so that learning is meaningful for them.

School achievement information shows that most children are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Almost all Māori children are achieving at or above the National Standards.

Those children whose progress and achievement needs accelerating and extending are included in the well-considered school targets.

Teachers use a wide range of ways to assess and identify those children who would benefit from targeted-teaching programmes. Individual progress is closely monitored. There are many examples of children making accelerated progress, as a result of their increased engagement in learning.

School leaders and teachers work collaboratively and have continued to extend processes to support them to make more accurate judgements about children’s achievement levels. School leaders have identified the need to evaluate the ways they assess and report to include all areas of the curriculum. They are considering extending moderation of assessment judgements across and beyond the school.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has many effective processes and practices that enable achievement of equity and excellence.

The school’s Christian values are strongly embedded to ensure all children are valued and supported in their learning. School leaders, teaching staff and the board have a strong commitment to the shared vision and values. The board and staff are very reflective, improvement focused and have high expectations for positive outcomes for all children’s learning, achievement and wellbeing.

School leadership provides very clear strategic direction to reduce disparity and improve outcomes for all children. Good use is made of individual teacher strengths, with regular and appropriate professional learning opportunities. Teachers receive meaningful and useful feedback through the school’s comprehensive appraisal process to grow their teaching practice. School leaders have built educationally-focused relationships with other educational and community institutions to increase learning opportunities for children and teachers.

The school’s curriculum is becoming increasingly responsive and child centred, based on meaningful learning contexts for individuals and groups of children. Older children are provided with many authentic leadership opportunities. Their views and opinions are valued and used in decision making. This contributes to the high levels of engagement in learning programmes.

Children and teachers benefit from the expertise of a Māori language tutor. This provides Māori children with a positive role model and increasing opportunities to hear and use the Māori language. School leaders have developed a useful long-term plan for providing ways to support Māori children’s success as Māori.

School leaders and teachers are strongly focused on building positive and meaningful partnerships with the children and their families. They make effective use of these relationships to promote children’s sense of belonging, wellbeing and to provide meaningful learning experiences that promote improved achievement.

The school has developed useful internal evaluation practices that identify improvements for children’s learning and achievement. The school’s strategic and annual plans identify key priorities and provide clear direction for further development. The annual goals are highly responsive to identified needs. The board is regularly informed about children’s progress and achievement and school operations through the principal’s comprehensive reporting process. Trustees use this information well to make decisions that will support all children to experience success in their learning.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

School leaders have made good use of internal evaluation practices to identify the school’s key priorities for further development. The school is yet to:

  • fully evaluate the curriculum to meet the school’s vision for teaching and learning

  • integrate and embed te ao Māori across all aspects of school practices and documentation

  • extend assessment and reporting in all learning areas beyond literacy and mathematics

  • increase the consistency and depth of teachers’ use and analysis of achievement information.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

27 April 2017

About the school 

Location

Blenheim

Ministry of Education profile number

421

School type

State Integrated

School roll

132

Gender composition

Girls 52%

Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 10%

Pākehā 53%

Pacific 4%

Asian 15%

Other 18%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2017

Date of this report

27 April 2017

Most recent ERO reports

June 2014

April 2011

 

Richmond View School - 16/06/2014

Findings

How effectively is this school’s curriculum promoting student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

The school’s curriculum is promoting and supporting student learning successfully. It provides a suitably varied range of learning experiences for students. A positive school culture reflects the school’s special character. Most students achieve well and many achieve very well in literacy and numeracy. Effective leadership, good governance and recent developments are likely to continue to promote school improvement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Richmond View School is an integrated Christian school run by a church-based trust. Its special character is actively promoted and clearly evident in the day-to-day life of the school.

Students come from across Marlborough to attend the school. The intake of students is becoming increasingly diverse. This mixture of backgrounds and cultures is helping to enrich students’ learning.

The school has a growing roll and has applied to the Ministry of Education to be able to take students from Years 1 to 10 in the future.

During 2013, the board appointed a new principal and deputy principal. The work of these leaders is helping to further enhance the quality of education for students.

The school provides students with a wide variety of resources and facilities. These include large-sized classrooms, a well-equipped library, a radio station and access to church buildings. Teachers make good use of these resources and facilities to support student learning.

The strengths noted in the schools April 2011 ERO report are still evident. Some good progress has been made towards addressing areas for improvement.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes good use of achievement information to foster student engagement, progress and achievement. This use is most evident in the way:

  • leaders share this information with the board and set purposeful annual targets to raise the achievement of specific groups of students
  • leaders and teachers identify and respond to the needs of students who would most benefit from additional support or challenge
  • teachers change aspects of their programme and teaching groups in response to emerging student strengths and needs
  • teachers share achievement information with students and their parents. This includes the recent establishment of more specific individual learning goals.

The quality of achievement information has been improved through better assessment practices. This means that the judgements teachers make about student achievement, particularly in literacy and mathematics, are becoming more robust.

An emerging strength of the school is the quality of the additional support teachers and teacher aides provide for students. This support is well managed, targeted, and monitored. Most of this support is an integrated part of classroom programmes.

The school is also giving a growing number of selected students additional opportunities to build on their strengths, gifts and talents in a range of curriculum areas.

Areas for review and development

School leaders and teachers should:

  • increase the use they make of analysed achievement information to report on the progress groups of students make over their time at the school
  • extend their analysis and reporting of student progress to the board to include aspects of learning beyond literacy and mathematics
  • improve the quality of the plans to help students achieve the annual achievement targets.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is promoting and supporting student learning successfully. It provides a suitably varied range of learning experiences for students. Leaders and teachers continue to expand the opportunities students have to experience success and receive a well-balanced education.

Particular features of the school’s curriculum include:

  • the way teachers successfully integrate Christian-based education across the curriculum
  • the opportunities students have to learn both within and beyond the school and from a variety of people
  • the growing use of information technologies for communication and to support aspects of teaching and learning
  • teachers’ increasing the range of strategies they use to effectively promote student learning.

Leaders and teachers provide students with a positive and supportive learning environment. Factors that promote such an environment include:

  • the quality of relationships between adults and students and among students that create a family-like atmosphere
  • the provisions made for pastoral care and the inclusive school culture that welcomes and affirms students and celebrates their successes
  • a growing emphasis on gaining and responding to student ideas and opinions.

These features promote students’ sense of belonging and wellbeing. Students are well motivated to learn.

Most students achieve well and many achieve very well in literacy and numeracy. Achievement is highest in reading and mathematics where significant numbers of students are achieving at and above the National Standards.

Areas for review and development

School leaders and teachers should now:

  • extend the school’s curriculum guidelines so these provide better direction for teaching, learning and evaluation
  • further personalise learning and promote student independence
  • improve the quality of curriculum reviews.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school is promoting educational success for Māori very well. School leaders are actively exploring further ways of promoting success for Māori as Māori.

School achievement information shows that Māori students achieve a little higher than their peers in literacy and mathematics.

School leaders are increasingly focused on supporting Māori students, language, culture and identity in the curriculum. For example:

  • classroom environments reflect te ao Māori and teachers affirm student’s cultural backgrounds
  • students are provided with good role models, opportunities to visit marae, and the school continues to develop links with the wider Māori community.
  • student and whānau opinions are sought, valued and responded to through the development of a useful plan to help promote Māori success.
Area for review and development

School leaders and teachers should build on the work being done to integrate biculturalism throughout the curriculum and provide professional development for staff in te reo and tikanga Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is becoming very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The school’s new principal and deputy principal work very well together to provide increasingly effective professional leadership. Key elements of this leadership include:

  • high expectations, a strong commitment to achieving excellence and to promoting ongoing school improvement
  • the promotion of a positive school culture that fosters collaboration, support and reflection, along with leaders modelling the practices they expect staff to use
  • well-considered decision making, clear and appropriate priorities and good planning for initiatives
  • their fostering of positive relationships with parents and the local church community and the links being established with the wider educational community.

The board performs its governance role well. A strong sense of partnership exists between the board, principal and other school leaders. They have shared beliefs and are working effectively together to achieve the school’s mission.

Governance and management practices that promote these partnerships and ongoing school development include:

  • the quality of the recently revised school charter and plans, and the establishment of a better framework for conducting self reviews
  • the range of information provided to the board to help inform decision making
  • the responsiveness of the board to requests that focus on supporting students’ learning and improving teaching practices.
Areas for review and development

The board should now give priority to embedding and building on recent initiatives in strategic planning and self review.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The school’s curriculum is promoting and supporting student learning successfully. It provides a suitably varied range of learning experiences for students. A positive school culture reflects the school’s special character. Most students achieve well and many achieve very well in literacy and numeracy. Effective leadership, good governance and recent developments are likely to continue to promote school improvement.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

16 June 2014

About the School

Location

Redwoodtown, Blenheim

Ministry of Education profile number

421

School type

Integrated Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

118

Gender composition

Boys 51%

Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Korean

African

Other Ethnicities

65%

6%

6%

7%

5%

11%

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

16 June 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

February 2008

April 2005