Lollipops Papamoa

Education institution number:
40295
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
49
Telephone:
Address:

95 Domain Road, Papamoa, Tauranga

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Lollipops Papamoa

1 Evaluation of Lollipops Papamoa

How well placed is Lollipops Papamoa to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Lollipops Papamoa is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Lollipops Papamoa, (formerly Sandbox Preschool), is located near Tauranga. It provides full-day education and care for children from birth to school age in two rooms. It is licensed for 50 children, including eight children up to the age of two years. The current roll of 29 includes eight children of Māori descent and five from a number of other ethnicities.

The centre is one of eight centres owned by Evolve Education Group in the Bay of Plenty region. An area manager, teaching learning and development manager, and centre support manager provide professional leadership and support to the onsite centre manager and teaching team.

The centre's philosophy is 'Ko te ahurei o te tamaiti arahia ō tātou mahi - let the uniqueness of the child guide our work.' It focuses on children becoming confident and capable life-long learners. Intended outcomes for children's learning include developing:

  • respect
  • empathy/social competence
  • culture and confidence
  • resilience and persistence
  • communication.

Since the last ERO review in 2015 a new area manager was appointed and there have been many changes to the teaching team. At the time of this ERO review an area manager, centre manager, and head teacher had just been appointed. The centre has responded well to the areas identified in the previous ERO report.

The Review Findings

Relationships between teachers and children are warm and caring. Children’s social competence is effectively developed through positive guidance and reinforcement. Teachers foster children’s oral language skills in meaningful contexts. Children with additional learning needs are well identified and supported through ongoing individualised planning and external support. Positive transition into and within the centre enables a sense of belonging for children.

Children up to the age of two experience respectful and responsive care. Teachers skilfully respond to children's non-verbal cues and attend to their needs. A whānau atmosphere supports opportunities for positive interactions between siblings, and older and younger children. Young children are secure in the environment, able to explore, make choices and learn at their own pace.       

The curriculum responds well to children’s interests and needs. An individualised approach to planning includes the aspirations of parents and whānau. Children have many opportunities to exercise choice, problem solve and participate in uninterrupted play and learning. Children are supported to become confident and independent learners.

Integration of te reo and tikanga Māori acknowledges the unique place of Māori and affirms Māori children’s sense of belonging. There is a need to incorporate aspects of children's languages, cultures and identities in individual planning and learning stories, and strengthen multi-cultural practices across the centre.

Leadership works collaboratively to foster a positive team culture. There are high levels of respect and relational trust amongst staff. Open communication is fostered with parents, who feel listened to, and make welcome. Leaders have a strategic approach to gathering parent views and aspirations. A new shared philosophy, vision and goals for the centre have been established after comprehensive consultation and review. Effective relationships contribute to positive outcomes for children.

Comprehensive systems and processes guide all centre operations. Clear identification of priorities informs strategic planning and direction. Effective policy review is completed in consultation with parents and whānau. Governance grows leadership capability and supports teachers through targeted professional learning, coaching and mentoring. The area manager is providing strong professional leadership to improve centre practices. Newly implemented frameworks for appraisal and internal evaluation are highly focused on improving outcomes for children. These now need to be fully embedded by leaders and teachers.  Children benefit from a safe and well-managed centre.

Key Next Steps

Further develop teacher and leadership capability to:

  • strengthen the assessment, planning and evaluation process informed by Te Whāriki
  • enrich children’s learning through intentional teaching and deliberate provocations that provide challenge and complexity
  • consistently carry out effective internal evaluation and appraisal to improve outcomes for all children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Lollipops Papamoa completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie
Director Review and Improvement Services Central
Central Region

27 March 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Papamoa, Bay of Plenty

Ministry of Education profile number

40295

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 8 aged under 2

Service roll

29

Gender composition

Boys                      22
Girls                         7

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Other

  8
16
  5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49%       50-79%       80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

January 2019

Date of this report

27 March 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

August 2015

Education Review

September 2012

Education Review

October 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau. 

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

The Sandbox Preschool - 19/08/2015

1 Evaluation of The Sandbox Preschool

How well placed is The Sandbox Preschool to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

The Sandbox Preschool is located in Papamoa, near Tauranga. The centre is licensed to provide all-day education and care for 50 children, including up to 8 children from birth to two years of age. At the time of this ERO review, there were 52 children enrolled, including 14 children who identify as Māori.

The centre philosophy acknowledges Te Tiriti o Waitangi and aims for teachers to form partnerships with whānau to build foundations for children’s lifelong learning. They are committed to ‘providing a nurturing, supportive and respectful environment where children and their teachers intimately know, respond and understand each other’s cues and rhythms’.

Since the 2012 ERO review, there has been a change of ownership. The centre is currently owned by Evolve Education Group. The under 2's area was reopened two years ago. While the centre has endeavoured to make changes to their appraisal processes, further review and development is required.

The Review Findings

Children settle quickly into a welcoming and well-prepared learning environment. They form positive, sensitive and responsive relationships with teachers and their peers. Children’s social and communication skills are fostered and, as a result, they are confident to interact with adults and their peers, supporting a strong sense of belonging. They demonstrate confidence, independence and problem-solving skills. They experience a range of opportunities for exploration and safe risk taking, and respond positively to social, physical and emotional challenges. Children experience early literacy and numeracy skills across all areas of the programme throughout their time at the centre.

Babies and toddlers enjoy and have fun in their learning. They experience a high level of nurturing, education and care. Teachers have regular contact with parents in order to provide familiar and comfortable routines consistent with their home environment. Babies benefit from a calm and flexible curriculum that offers choice and a sense of security. Teachers respond well to their oral and non-verbal communication. They model and encourage development of rich oral language skills. Children also have access to a range of resources and equipment that support their changing needs and preferences. It would be beneficial to upgrade these provisions and the learning spaces, to better provide children with opportunities for physically active and exploratory play.

The centre programme provides children with choices about their learning. Teachers are responsive to children’s interests and encourage their independence. They know children well and communicate regularly with parents about their learning and development. They seek parents’ aspirations and give feedback about how these are being nurtured and achieved. Bicultural practice is increasingly included in the centre programmes through displays, waiata, books and some te reo Māori. Leaders recognise the importance of continuing to develop teachers’ skills and the consistency of practice across the centre.

Children’s individual portfolios provide a rich and meaningful record of their participation and learning. Teachers reflect on children’s learning stories and plan their teaching to support the growth of learning dispositions. Teachers’ planning could be further developed by evaluating how well children’s learning has been extended and made more complex.

The experienced and knowledgeable centre leaders support a cohesive team of staff who share a common philosophy. Leadership is shared in order to use the strengths and interests of teachers. Professional development in literacy has impacted positively on teachers’ knowledge, the centre programme, and information for parents. Staff are involved in spontaneous self reviews aimed at improving centre practices and outcomes for children. There is a need for more attention to be given to planned, long-term self reviews.

The new owners are committed to maintaining good practice in the centre and providing appropriate professional development and support for centre leaders and staff. They are also available to provide guidance and advice about centre operations.

Key Next Steps

There is a need for leaders to review and strengthen self-review processes in order to more effectively evaluate teaching practice and continually improve outcomes for children. This would better enable them to review:

  • progress towards achieving the centre vision, goals and outcomes, and inform the development of priorities, plans, policies and actions
  • staff appraisal processes, which should include reflection and monitoring, links to the centre vision, professional teaching standards, and specific teachers’ goals focused on improving outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of The Sandbox Preschool completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum

  • premises and facilities

  • health and safety practices

  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of The Sandbox Preschool will be in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

19 August 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Papamoa

Ministry of Education profile number

40295

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

50 children, including up to 8 aged under 2

Service roll

52

Gender composition

Boys 35 Girls 17

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Niuean

Other

14

31

2

5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

July 2015

Date of this report

19 August 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

 

Education Review

September 2012

Education Review

October 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.