Halfmoon Bay School

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Education institution number:
3961
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
39
Telephone:
Address:

Ayr Street, Half Moon Bay, Stewart Island

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School Context

Halfmoon Bay School is a small, rural full primary school located in Oban, Stewart Island. At the time of this review there were 32 students on the roll, 30% of whom identify as Māori.

The mission statement is ‘he moana pukepuke e ekengia a te waka - a choppy sea can be navigated’. The mission statement is underpinned by the PART values: Perseverance, Adventure, Respect and Teamwork.

The strategic focus for 2020 is centred on two goals which state that all students at Halfmoon Bay will be ‘Schooled for success’ through high quality teaching and learning programmes, and that they will show behavioural, emotional and cognitive engagement in their learning.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics
  • progress/accelerated progress in literacy.

Since the June 2017 ERO review there have been some changes to the board of trustees and teaching staff.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is highly effective in achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for its students.

The 2018 and 2019 achievement reports show that almost all students achieved at or above the school’s curriculum expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics was proportionally greater than achievement for non-Māori students. A range of well-tailored interventions enables students who need extra support with their learning to achieve.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school effectively accelerates the progress of all students who need this. Students’ progress and achievement is closely monitored and individual students are provided with specific programmes that best support their particular needs.

Most students targeted in intervention groups made more than expected progress and most reached their expected level. The school’s information shows high rates of progress and acceleration throughout the year for these students.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The school’s processes are highly effective in enabling equity and excellence. Strong leadership focuses on ensuring ongoing improvement. Cohesive and coherent schoolwide systems and processes have enabled consistent, effective and adaptive teaching practices.

Students experience a curriculum that is highly responsive to their strengths, needs and interests. They benefit from a rich localised curriculum that provides authentic learning contexts within and beyond the school. Curriculum programmes prioritise the natural world, physical challenge, sensory integration, socialisation, practical learning and academic extension. Local resources and community experts are well utilised. The P.A.R.T values are reflected through all aspects of school life.

Students take ownership of their learning resulting in increasingly positive outcomes for their wellbeing and progress. They participate and learn in caring, collaborative, inclusive learning environments. They play an active role in leading their own learning. Classroom routines are well established. Teachers use differentiated learning approaches to engage students. They know them well, cater for their individual learning styles, and build on their prior knowledge, culture, language and identity. Student success and progress are celebrated and shared in multiple ways through online portals, regular reporting and community engagement. Opportunities for student leadership are strongly evident at appropriate levels, and participation in a range of activities has developed their confidence and resilience.

The principal prioritises relationships to lead an ongoing improvement focus. This supports the conditions for collaborative practice, with a flexible team-based approach to the day to day running of the school. Teachers go the extra mile to provide an inclusive, community-based curriculum. Transitions into, within and out of school are very well managed, with strong and effective relationships with the local early childhood centre and secondary schools on the mainland.

The board of trustees, the principal and teachers promote a culture of high trust and collaboration within the school and wider community. This enables collective ownership of outcomes for students. The principal and teachers have built strong learning-centred relationships with parents and whānau. They value the expertise and contribution of the wider community in the life of the school. Together they engage and support students and their families with responsive and individualised approaches. The school is seen as the hub of the community and it is continually developing and building learning partnerships.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

There is a strong acknowledgement and inclusion of te ao Māori across learning areas which is evident in the environment, the values, and connectedness with local iwi. Leaders and teachers should continue to develop culturally responsive practices throughout the school by giving greater prominence to te ao Māori, tikanga Māori and te reo Māori, and ensuring key aspects of these are embedded in all strategic documents.

The board, leaders and teachers would benefit from better knowing the impact of programmes, practices and initiatives. They should continue to develop internal evaluation capability and evaluative reporting. This would lead to a more thorough understanding of what makes the greatest difference for learners and ensure consistency of practice across the school.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Halfmoon Bay School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Strong.

ERO’s Framework: Overall Findings and Judgement Tool derived from School Evaluation Indicators: Effective Practice for Improvement and Learner Success is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • strong leadership that has established a culture of high trust and collaboration and that places the wellbeing and success of all students at the centre
  • school systems, processes and practices that are strongly focused on achieving equity and excellence, and accelerating children’s progress
  • a well-developed and responsive school curriculum that effectively uses students’ interests, teachers’ skills and knowledge, the environment and wider community to make learning engaging and relevant.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • continuing to develop culturally responsive practices throughout the school by giving greater prominence to te ao , tikanga and te reo Māori
  • the board, leaders and teachers further developing internal evaluation capability to better know the impact of programmes practices and initiatives, and to have a deeper understanding of what is making the greatest difference for learners.

Dr Lesley Patterson Director

Review and Improvement Services (Southern)

Southern Region - Te Tai Tini

26 May 2020

About the school

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.

Summary

The school has a roll of 30. Ten children identify as Māori.

The school has successfully addressed the recommendations for improvement in the 2013 ERO report.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school effectively responds to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.The processes for supporting children’s learning are very good quality. They enable the trustees, principal and teachers to effectively identify practices which need development.

At the time of this review children benefit from a curriculum that strongly supports them to become confident, connected, actively involved learners for life on and beyond Stewart Island. Learning is relevant and connected to the wider community and unique environment.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school effectively responds well to Māori children and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school’s achievement trends over the last three years shows that most Māori and other children are achieving well in mathematics, reading and writing.

School achievement information shows that some children have made accelerated progress in relation to the National Standards. Achievement information also shows that some children have not made sufficient progress to maintain a satisfactory level of achievement. These children are provided with additional programmes.

The teachers employ effective practices to make reliable judgements about children’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school processes for supporting children’s learning are very good quality.

The school’s curriculum design is responsive to the aspirations of students, parents and the wider community. Its enactment ensures that every student has opportunities to sufficiently progress to achieve the valued outcomes described in the charter. The principles of manaakitanga/caring, whanaungatanga/inclusion, mahi tahi/working together and ako (where all are both teacher and learner) are highly visible within the school community.

The collaborations the school has with its wider community enrich overall learning experiences for all. The extensive use teachers and students make of their unique environment strongly supports the school’s vision. Children’s learning is well connected across all learning areas within authentic contexts.

Students are well engaged in their learning and understand their role in the learning process. They show good understanding of the school’s vision and regularly assess and report their progress against this. Teachers actively seek ways to increase their own knowledge and skills to improve childrens learning. Teachers and children make effective use of digital technologies as a tool for children to become successful learners, and to connect them to the wider world.

Board funding enables ongoing use of a range of specialised programmes including those initiated by the Ministry of Education. The board, principal and teachers place an appropriate focus on writing. This includes learners seeing writing as a tool and being able to write competently in all subject areas.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

The school has effective processes to identify practices which need development.

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Annual goals and targets do not clearly state what the school is wanting to achieve in terms of valued and improved outcomes for children. The school needs to develop clearly stated goals and targets to strengthen their alignment to the school’s charter and to make the monitoring and reporting of them more meaningful.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are:

  • to state the annual goals more clearly and show how they align with the desired outcomes as expressed in the charter

  • specifically include in the charter, targets to accelerate the progress of those children yet to reach the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

29 June 2017

About the school 

Location

Stewart Island

Ministry of Education profile number

3961

School type

Full Primary (Years 1-8)

School roll

30

Gender composition

Boys: 16 Girls: 14

Ethnic composition

Māori 10
Pākehā 20

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

29 June 2017

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review September 2013
Education Review March 2010
Education Review March 2007