Ouruhia Model School

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Education institution number:
3464
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Model School
Total roll:
56
Telephone:
Address:

21 Turners Road, Ouruhia, Christchurch

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School Context

Ouruhia Model School has a roll of 77 students from Years 1 to 8. It is located in a semi-rural community on the outskirts of Christchurch. The school’s model status means it has close links with initial teacher education programmes.

The school’s vision, our people, our place, our future, is supported by a mission statement focused on learning for life and making it count. The valued outcomes for learners include students being thinking, independent learners who are caring and sharing, and have a ‘can do’ attitude.

Strategic goals focus on:

  • improving teachers’ knowledge and skills for teaching, learning and assessment
  • delivering a curriculum which prepares and motivates students for life-long learning
  • enhancing open communication with students, families and the community.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • achievement in reading, writing and mathematics

  • positive behaviour management processes that support consistent practice and guide children’s behaviour.

There have been few changes in staff at the school in recent years. There is a mix of experienced and new trustees on the board.

Since the last ERO review, the leaders and teachers have participated in Ministry of Education professional learning and development initiatives including accelerated learning in mathematics (ALIM) and positive behaviour for learning (PB4L).

Ouruhia Model School is part of the Katote Kāhui Ako | Community of Learning (CoL).

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is effectively achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for most of its students.

Students are achieving well in reading and mathematics. Overall achievement in reading, writing and mathematics for all groups have had sustained improvement over time. Māori students achieve at the same levels as their peers. Achievement levels in writing is at or above expected standards and has remained constant over recent years.

There is no formal reporting on children’s achievement against other curriculum areas and the school’s valued outcomes.

Children with additional learning needs are well supported to make progress.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school is effective in accelerating the progress of the majority of students in writing and mathematics.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Trustees, senior leaders and teachers have a strong commitment to equity and excellence for all learners. The school has many effective processes to progress the learning and achievement of all children. These particularly relate to children’s wellbeing and opportunities in learning. There is a deliberate focus on relationships which is providing a culture of inclusiveness.

The school’s strategic plan, aligned to its Kāhui Ako priorities, provides clear direction. The principal and teachers, with the support of the Board, have targeted professional development to focus on improving learner outcomes and increase teacher capability.

Leadership builds relational trust and effective collaboration at every level of the school community. Children, parents, whānau and the community are well known and learning-centred relationships are actively promoted.

Since the November 2014 ERO report, leaders and teachers have responded well to the recommendations to further promote equity and excellence outcomes. These responses have led to specific actions which include:

  • regular internal evaluation of programmes for priority learners

  • closely monitoring the progress of targeted children

  • building teacher capacity to accelerate student achievement

  • documenting teacher expectations to ensure greater consistency for children’s learning

  • increasing constructive feedback through the appraisal system.

Tuakana-teina relationships are well embedded in the learning environment. Children are provided with opportunities to experience and value te ao Māori. Professional development is helping to build culturally responsive practices across the school.

The principal and teachers effectively manage and promote an environment that supports participation, engagement and choices in learning. Children benefit from programmes that are responsive to their needs, interests and abilities. A responsive and localised curriculum provides children with many opportunities to learn. The school proactively identifies and draws on community resources to enhance learning experiences, achievement and wellbeing.

The principal consistently monitors, evaluates and reports on a number of goals that relate to the acceleration and progress of children who are at risk of not achieving. Teachers are using learning information and inquiry to improve outcomes for all children. Moderation and assessment practices contribute to effective teacher judgements about children’s learning.

The school’s performance management system is focused on consolidating teacher capability to improve outcomes for children.

Teachers have effective practices to support children who need extra support with their learning. They know these children well as individuals and learners, and carefully monitor and report to parents each child’s progress.

The school’s involvement in the Katote Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning is having a positive impact on teaching and learning. The school is confident that its role in the Kāhui Ako will further strengthen relationships with other schools and teachers, and improve opportunities for children to experience success.

The board actively represents and serves the community and school in its role. It takes pride in the improvements and successes which the school community celebrates. Trustees receive regular reports about school priorities, student achievement targets and behaviour management. They use this information to ensure the focus remains on equity and excellence for all children.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Some areas of the school’s processes need to be strengthened and embedded to increase their effectiveness in achieving equity and excellence. The board and leaders need to continue to:

  • develop and strengthen internal evaluation to build understanding and practice for ongoing improvement and innovation. This includes evaluating the impact of strategies and initiatives to improve learning outcomes
  • strengthen and embed current bicultural practices through the curriculum, strategic planning and physical environment.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • a culture of collaboration and inclusiveness that builds relational trust and maintains high expectations for learner-centred success

  • a responsive vision and localised curriculum that emphasises student agency and broad opportunities for learning experiences

  • achieving outcomes for students that are equitable for all groups and show consistently good levels of achievement.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • continuing to improve internal evaluation practices

  • strengthening and embedding current bicultural practices.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Waipounamu - Southern Region

9 May 2018

About the school

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

3464

School type

Full Primary (Year 1-8)

School roll

77

Gender composition

Girls: 43 Boys: 34

Ethnic composition

Māori: 16

Pākehā: 59

Other: 2

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2018

Date of this report

9 May 2018

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review: November 2014

Education Review: August 2011

Findings 

Ouruhia Model School continues to provide students with good quality education within an inclusive environment. The school's curriculum provides students with an interesting range of learning opportunities. Students' individual learning needs are identified, well catered for and closely monitored. The board, principal and staff work collaboratively. A highly reflective culture ensures ongoing improvement for student learning and wellbeing. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Ouruhia Model School is a small school situated on the outskirts of Christchurch city. Its model status gives it close links with teacher education programmes.

The Christchurch earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 impacted strongly on families and the community. The school roll has fluctuated since this time. A proposal to close the school was changed as the result of a Ministry of Education (MoE) review in 2014. The school will remain open for at least another five years. An enrolment scheme is in place.

Families come from a diverse range of socio economic backgrounds. The school fosters a culture that is inclusive for students and their families. Staffing levels are stable and teachers have a very good understanding of the challenges that face students and their families within the area.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Teachers are gathering and using good quality achievement information to guide classroom programmes that effectively support and engage students in their learning. Teachers use an appropriate range of assessment tools to identify learning levels and needs. They have improved the consistency of their judgements about students' learning. Classroom programmes are well prepared and include focussed teaching for groups and individual students.

Relationships between students and their teachers are respectful and caring. Teachers have very good understanding of each student's interests, aspirations and needs. Each student is valued for who they are.

Achievement information reported to the board shows a wide range in achievement levels. In reading, students are achieving at similar levels to other students in Canterbury. The information identifies concerns with achievement levels in writing and mathematics for some boys in the senior school, and some Māori students. Fluctuations in the school roll since the earthquakes, is a contributing factor to the wide range of achievement levels. The school acknowledges the importance of lifting the achievement levels of these students.

Achievement targets for priority learners are developed from well analysed school-wide achievement information. All students who achieve below National Standards are included in board achievement targets. Priority learners are clearly identified by class teachers and appropriate programmes are prepared to accelerate their learning levels. When needed, targeted students receive high quality specialist teaching. The progress of all students is very well tracked and individually recorded to show their progress.

Students have a good understanding of their learning progress. They receive specific feedback about their successes and next learning steps. This helps them to set goals for future learning. Students' ideas are listened to and responded to. Students spoken with said teachers frequently work individually with them to make sure they understand and can work to achieve their goals.

The next steps to improve achievement levels are for the principal and teachers to continue: 

  • regular evaluation of programmes provided for priority learners
  • close monitoring of the progress of targeted students
  • to engage in ongoing professional development that helps teachers to further accelerate student achievement levels. 

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students engage effectively in a wide range of learning opportunities within and beyond the school's curriculum. Teachers have given high priority to teaching in writing and mathematics because of concerns about the achievement levels of some students. Students have benefitted from strong programmes in the arts. They have participated in a suitable range of other learning opportunities within the school and through education outside the classroom.

School values strongly support classroom learning and the wider school culture. Parents have been involved in confirming the values they feel best support their children's learning. Students are able to talk about the values that help them to learn. Senior students role model these values well when they care for and support younger students in the playground and in peer-tutoring situations.

The focus that teachers give to identifying and meeting individual learning needs within class programmes is a strength of teaching within the school's curriculum. Teachers give specific individual guidance to improve students' thinking and problem-solving skills. Students are given choices that foster different ways of learning that best meet their needs. Learning with peers is well embedded within classroom programmes. Learning support for targeted students is well incorporated within class programmes.

Teachers are strongly collaborative in sharing good teaching practices. Their professional development opportunities have been well targeted to improve teaching in writing, and to help students to effectively use a range of technologies in their learning.

The principal and ERO agree that the next steps to develop the school's curriculum are to: 

  • extend thinking strategies and inquiry learning approaches across curriculum areas other than literacy and mathematics and identify how they could develop from Year 1 to 8
  • select what achievement information should be gathered from these curriculum areas to show students' learning progress as they move through the school
  • document teaching expectations to ensure there is shared understanding among teachers, and that there is consistency for students' learning. 

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students are well supported as Māori through school initiatives that include the teaching and use of te reo Māori in all classrooms, and students experiencing aspects of tikanga Māori, within and outside of the school. Parents of Māori students have been given opportunity to share their aspirations for their children to achieve as Māori.

The next step to strengthen the school's support of Māori students and their families is to extend the board's strategic plan to include goals for the ongoing support for Māori students to achieve as Māori.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Trustees work closely with the principal to maintain a strong focus on students' learning and wellbeing. Trustees have developed a comprehensive strategic plan with goals that give clear direction to the principal and teachers. The annual planning process is effective in identifying priorities and indicators for success in achieving board goals.

The principal works professionally and effectively in leading the staff as a team. He supports staff to grow their curriculum leadership skills. The principal's reports to the board provide trustees with well analysed achievement information, and progress against board goals and targets.

Effective self review that aims to improve learning and teaching is competently led and extends across school practices. Regular monitoring and evaluation of board strategic goals is central to school review. Teachers are reflective in their practices and contribute to all aspects of school review. The outcomes from review are consistently used to plan improvements for students' learning and wellbeing.

The board, principal and teachers have established strong links with parents. They have maintained regular levels of consultation with them. Parents have good opportunities to be informed about and involved in their children's learning.

Board priorities give clear direction to teachers and this is well reflected in their appraisal programme.

The next steps for the board and leadership to improve performance are to: 

  • develop a policy and/or procedures to better guide and manage school-wide self review
  • review and develop current job descriptions
  • increase constructive feedback in principal and teacher appraisal to help them develop more specific goals for future improvement. 

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to: 

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement: 

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance. 

Conclusion

Ouruhia Model School continues to provide students with good quality education within an inclusive environment. The school's curriculum provides students with an interesting range of learning opportunities. Students' individual learning needs are identified, well catered for and closely monitored. The board, principal and staff work collaboratively. A highly reflective culture ensures ongoing improvement for student learning and wellbeing.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

7 November 2014

School Statistics

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

3464

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

99

Gender composition

Girls 50; Boys 49

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Other ethnicities

80

13

3

3

Review team on site

September 2014

Date of this report

7 November 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2011

November 2007

February 2005