Hornby High School

Education institution number:
338
School type:
Secondary (Year 7-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
743
Telephone:
Address:

180 Waterloo Road, Hornby, Christchurch

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Hornby High School

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 15 months of the Education Review Office and Hornby High School working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website. www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Hornby High School is a Years 7 to 13 state co-educational school. The school was rebuilt on its original site and re-occupied progressively in 2018 and 2019. The new school has been designed to enable flexibility in teaching and learning.

Hornby High School is a member school in the Manaiakalani Programme using the 'Learn, Create, Share' approach to teaching and learning. Three new senior leaders have been appointed since 2017.

Hornby High School’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are to:

  • provide future focused individualised learning

  • promote culturally sustainable learning focused relationships to support student success

  • foster inspirational risk taking and enterprising leadership amongst all members of the school learning community.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Hornby High School’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate the impact of evaluation and inquiry on outcomes for students and staff.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • teachers have undertaken ongoing professional development and learning in evaluation since 2017

  • leaders want to know the impact of professional learning in evaluation on outcomes for learners

  • focusing on staff data literacy has been identified as an aspect of evaluation to strengthen

  • leaders acknowledge that teachers' inquiries can be a key driver of school improvement.

The school expects to see:

  • robust, rigorous evidence gathering informing teaching and learning throughout the school

  • a relentless focus from all teachers on accelerating the progress of all learners who need this

  • teachers identifying what is working and what is not, to raise achievement and accelerate progress for individual students

  • equitable outcomes for all learners, in particular parity in achievement and pathways for Māori and Pacific learners.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to support the school in its goal to provide a centre for creative excellence.

  • The consistent and coherent teaching and learning students experience through the ongoing engagement in the Manaiakalani kaupapa of ‘learn, create, share’.

  • The comprehensive longitudinal student learning information the school gathers as part of the Manaiakalani partnership.

  • Leaders and teachers ongoing focus to learn more about effective evaluation and inquiry.

  • The culture of pastoral care and support that staff provide to seek the best outcomes for students and their families.

  • The belief and commitment of senior leaders to school improvement through evaluation.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • information gathering from students, teachers and caregivers about what has been successful in accelerating students’ progress in reading, writing and mathematics

  • the analysis and interpretation of the information gathered from the above stakeholders in relation to accelerated progress

  • communicating the findings of its investigation to the board, community, teachers and students

  • ensuring that teachers are evaluating and adapting their teaching practice to align with the practices identified in the accelerated learning inquiry.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Dr Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services (Southern)
Southern Region | Te Tai Tini

9 August 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Hornby High School

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2021 to 2024

As of December 2021, the Hornby High School Board of Trustees has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Hornby High School Board of Trustees.

The next Board of Trustees assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Dr Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services (Southern)
Southern Region | Te Tai Tini

9 August 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Hornby High School

Provision for International Students Report

Background

The Education Review Office reviews schools that are signatories to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020.

Findings

Hornby High School has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. The school’s process for annual self-review against the Code is thorough.   

No international students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.  

The school is effectively reviewing its provision against the Code.  

International students’ learning and wellbeing are well supported. Adaptations are made to students’ learning programmes to best meet their needs. The director of International Students is updating the school’s documentation in relation to the Schools International Education Business Association guidelines.  

Dr Lesley Patterson
Director Review and Improvement Services (Southern)
Southern Region | Te Tai Tini

9 August 2022 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Hornby High School - 24/09/2015

Findings

Hornby High School provides an inclusive, family-like learning environment for students. Leadership and governance are highly effective and focused on getting the best outcomes for every student. The school celebrates the diverse backgrounds of its multicultural students, and biculturalism is well embedded. The next step is to make sure that the best examples of teaching practice are evident school wide.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Hornby High School became a Years 7 to 13 school in 2014. The board, senior leaders and teachers have embraced this move, and are working hard to create a unified school, with a focus on collaborative practices across Years 7 to 10.

The school provides education for students from a wide range of cultures. The multicultural nature of the student population is celebrated in a way that recognises and values students’ language, culture and identity. Within this environment, biculturalism is well embedded. All students have good opportunities to learn about and be a part of what is unique in Aotearoa.

Students are very loyal to their school and are proud of their own and the school’s achievements. There are well-established links with the community and other schools within the area.

Future plans for a rebuild of the school are a key focus for the board and leaders. They are looking forward to moving teaching and learning in ways that will best support students for the world they will move into when they leave school.

The school has made good progress in the areas identified for further work in the 2012 ERO report. The assessment practices at Years 9 and 10 have improved, but are still work in progress.

2. Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information very well to improve students’ engagement, progress and achievement. Teachers, deans and heads of departments regularly analyse engagement and achievement data and make changes to the curriculum and their teaching in response. There are effective systems in place to monitor students’ wellbeing as well as their achievement.

Teachers and school leaders have high expectations of students. This is reflected in high levels of engagement and increasing levels of achievement.

Within this increased achievement there has been variation for Years 11 to 13 from year to year. In 2014, students achieved very well in NCEA Level 1. Success rates for these students were above that of the national average. The school has processes to help ensure this improved trend continues. Achievement information is being collected to see trends for Years 7 and 8 National Standards in reading, writing and numeracy. School achievement information is showing that many students are making expected progress.

Leaders and teachers actively promote and involve students in learning-centred relationships. There are strong positive relationships between teachers and students, and among the staff. Teachers understand the importance of high quality relationships in achieving positive outcomes for students.

Students have many opportunities for meaningful learning experiences within a whānau-like environment. There is a holistic approach to supporting students’ learning which includes pastoral care and programmes that are responsive to the needs of students as individuals and groups.

School leaders and teachers are aware that students need to take increased responsibility for their learning. There is now a stronger focus on teachers inquiring into their practice, and professional development about effective teaching methods. This is likely to lead to students being more involved in assessing their progress and making decisions about how and what they learn.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students participate and learn in a caring, collaborative, inclusive learning environment.

Teachers are working hard to improve the way that they teach so that students’ learning is well supported. The focus on Actively Involved Learners is supporting students to take increasing responsibility for becoming life-long learners.

The increasing collaboration and cohesion of the curriculum is evident in the way that teachers from different departments are talking and planning together to make learning more seamless for students. A next step is to extend the good work that has begun in Years 7 to 9 across further year levels and departments in the senior school.

There is a strong focus on learning values. These are incorporated naturally into the curriculum and culture of the school.

Students are able to choose learning pathways that meet their interests and needs. They have good advice and guidance throughout their time at the school to support them to follow their chosen pathways when they leave school. Teachers regularly seek students’ views and use them to adapt how and what they teach.

Students use digital devices and ICT resources in ways that promote learning and digital and technological literacy. This is a growing area of development, especially in Years 7 to 9.

There are some very good examples of effective teaching strategies within some areas of the school. School leaders need to ensure that the consistency of good teaching practice continues to improve.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school very effectively promotes educational success as Māori. Teachers and leaders know what works to improve achievement and use these strategies in their planning and teaching. This is resulting in improved achievement results. The achievement of Māori students is seen as an important collective responsibility.

Māori students have many opportunities to identify with and be proud of their heritage. The kapa haka group is becoming an increasingly important part of the school. Students take the many opportunities to learn te reo and tikanga Māori and more opportunities are planned for next year.

Māori and Pacific students are well supported in their learning. Teachers know them well. Deans and mentors work one-on-one with students who need extra support. The homework club supports Pacific and Māori ways of learning and is well used by students from all ethnicities and backgrounds.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. School leaders collaboratively develop and enact the school's vision, values, goals and priorities.

The leadership of the principal and senior leaders is a strength of the school. It results in good alignment from the board’s strategic plan, through department and individual teachers’ goals to what happens in the classroom for students.

The board and principal think strategically about how to improve outcomes for students. They have made some strategic staff appointments that are leading to good improvements in teaching and learning. They are focused on the things that are important, and especially on student achievement. The use of task forces has enabled staff time and energy to be targeted towards specific goals and priorities.

A focus on continuous improvement is evident in the way that school leaders and teachers reflect on how to get the best outcomes for every student. There is good use of a wide range of information to assist with this process. Teachers analyse data and explore ways that they can add value to the learning process. Sound evaluation processes support teachers and school leaders to keep a focus on improvement.

The board of trustees understands its governance and stewardship role. Board meetings are well managed so that trustees can focus on enabling all students to become confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners. Their time is spent on the things that matter most.

The board is in the process of changing the curriculum review process. Trustees are aware that they need to receive information in a form that best supports them to make strategic decisions. Once the new process is implemented, it is likely that the board will be better placed to support and further improve student outcomes.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review, three international students had just arrived at the school. There are well developed systems and practices to ensure that international students are included in the daily life of the school. There is good support for learning English through in-class and specialist classes. This includes achieving English qualifications where appropriate.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Hornby High School provides an inclusive, family-like learning environment for students. Leadership and governance are highly effective and focused on getting the best outcomes for every student. The school celebrates the diverse backgrounds of its multicultural students, and biculturalism is well embedded. The next step is to make sure that the best examples of teaching practice are evident school wide.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Chris Rowe Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Acting)

24 September 2015

About the School

Location

Hornby

Ministry of Education profile number

338

School type

Secondary (Years 7 to 13)

School roll

622

Number of international students

3

Gender composition

Girls 52%, Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Asian

Other Ethnicities

46%

28%

12%

12%

2%

Special Features

Hornby Technology Centre

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

24 September 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review Education Review Supplementary Review

May 2012 June 2009 June 2006