Hornby High School

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Education institution number:
338
School type:
Secondary (Year 7-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
751
Telephone:
Address:

180 Waterloo Road, Hornby, Christchurch

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Findings

Hornby High School provides an inclusive, family-like learning environment for students. Leadership and governance are highly effective and focused on getting the best outcomes for every student. The school celebrates the diverse backgrounds of its multicultural students, and biculturalism is well embedded. The next step is to make sure that the best examples of teaching practice are evident school wide.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Hornby High School became a Years 7 to 13 school in 2014. The board, senior leaders and teachers have embraced this move, and are working hard to create a unified school, with a focus on collaborative practices across Years 7 to 10.

The school provides education for students from a wide range of cultures. The multicultural nature of the student population is celebrated in a way that recognises and values students’ language, culture and identity. Within this environment, biculturalism is well embedded. All students have good opportunities to learn about and be a part of what is unique in Aotearoa.

Students are very loyal to their school and are proud of their own and the school’s achievements. There are well-established links with the community and other schools within the area.

Future plans for a rebuild of the school are a key focus for the board and leaders. They are looking forward to moving teaching and learning in ways that will best support students for the world they will move into when they leave school.

The school has made good progress in the areas identified for further work in the 2012 ERO report. The assessment practices at Years 9 and 10 have improved, but are still work in progress.

2. Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information very well to improve students’ engagement, progress and achievement. Teachers, deans and heads of departments regularly analyse engagement and achievement data and make changes to the curriculum and their teaching in response. There are effective systems in place to monitor students’ wellbeing as well as their achievement.

Teachers and school leaders have high expectations of students. This is reflected in high levels of engagement and increasing levels of achievement.

Within this increased achievement there has been variation for Years 11 to 13 from year to year. In 2014, students achieved very well in NCEA Level 1. Success rates for these students were above that of the national average. The school has processes to help ensure this improved trend continues. Achievement information is being collected to see trends for Years 7 and 8 National Standards in reading, writing and numeracy. School achievement information is showing that many students are making expected progress.

Leaders and teachers actively promote and involve students in learning-centred relationships. There are strong positive relationships between teachers and students, and among the staff. Teachers understand the importance of high quality relationships in achieving positive outcomes for students.

Students have many opportunities for meaningful learning experiences within a whānau-like environment. There is a holistic approach to supporting students’ learning which includes pastoral care and programmes that are responsive to the needs of students as individuals and groups.

School leaders and teachers are aware that students need to take increased responsibility for their learning. There is now a stronger focus on teachers inquiring into their practice, and professional development about effective teaching methods. This is likely to lead to students being more involved in assessing their progress and making decisions about how and what they learn.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students participate and learn in a caring, collaborative, inclusive learning environment.

Teachers are working hard to improve the way that they teach so that students’ learning is well supported. The focus on Actively Involved Learners is supporting students to take increasing responsibility for becoming life-long learners.

The increasing collaboration and cohesion of the curriculum is evident in the way that teachers from different departments are talking and planning together to make learning more seamless for students. A next step is to extend the good work that has begun in Years 7 to 9 across further year levels and departments in the senior school.

There is a strong focus on learning values. These are incorporated naturally into the curriculum and culture of the school.

Students are able to choose learning pathways that meet their interests and needs. They have good advice and guidance throughout their time at the school to support them to follow their chosen pathways when they leave school. Teachers regularly seek students’ views and use them to adapt how and what they teach.

Students use digital devices and ICT resources in ways that promote learning and digital and technological literacy. This is a growing area of development, especially in Years 7 to 9.

There are some very good examples of effective teaching strategies within some areas of the school. School leaders need to ensure that the consistency of good teaching practice continues to improve.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school very effectively promotes educational success as Māori. Teachers and leaders know what works to improve achievement and use these strategies in their planning and teaching. This is resulting in improved achievement results. The achievement of Māori students is seen as an important collective responsibility.

Māori students have many opportunities to identify with and be proud of their heritage. The kapa haka group is becoming an increasingly important part of the school. Students take the many opportunities to learn te reo and tikanga Māori and more opportunities are planned for next year.

Māori and Pacific students are well supported in their learning. Teachers know them well. Deans and mentors work one-on-one with students who need extra support. The homework club supports Pacific and Māori ways of learning and is well used by students from all ethnicities and backgrounds.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. School leaders collaboratively develop and enact the school's vision, values, goals and priorities.

The leadership of the principal and senior leaders is a strength of the school. It results in good alignment from the board’s strategic plan, through department and individual teachers’ goals to what happens in the classroom for students.

The board and principal think strategically about how to improve outcomes for students. They have made some strategic staff appointments that are leading to good improvements in teaching and learning. They are focused on the things that are important, and especially on student achievement. The use of task forces has enabled staff time and energy to be targeted towards specific goals and priorities.

A focus on continuous improvement is evident in the way that school leaders and teachers reflect on how to get the best outcomes for every student. There is good use of a wide range of information to assist with this process. Teachers analyse data and explore ways that they can add value to the learning process. Sound evaluation processes support teachers and school leaders to keep a focus on improvement.

The board of trustees understands its governance and stewardship role. Board meetings are well managed so that trustees can focus on enabling all students to become confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners. Their time is spent on the things that matter most.

The board is in the process of changing the curriculum review process. Trustees are aware that they need to receive information in a form that best supports them to make strategic decisions. Once the new process is implemented, it is likely that the board will be better placed to support and further improve student outcomes.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review, three international students had just arrived at the school. There are well developed systems and practices to ensure that international students are included in the daily life of the school. There is good support for learning English through in-class and specialist classes. This includes achieving English qualifications where appropriate.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Hornby High School provides an inclusive, family-like learning environment for students. Leadership and governance are highly effective and focused on getting the best outcomes for every student. The school celebrates the diverse backgrounds of its multicultural students, and biculturalism is well embedded. The next step is to make sure that the best examples of teaching practice are evident school wide.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Chris Rowe Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Acting)

24 September 2015

About the School

Location

Hornby

Ministry of Education profile number

338

School type

Secondary (Years 7 to 13)

School roll

622

Number of international students

3

Gender composition

Girls 52%, Boys 48%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Asian

Other Ethnicities

46%

28%

12%

12%

2%

Special Features

Hornby Technology Centre

Review team on site

August 2015

Date of this report

24 September 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review Education Review Supplementary Review

May 2012 June 2009 June 2006

Findings

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

The board and staff have made significant improvements to the learning culture of the school. This is resulting in improved achievement levels for students. Relationships between students and staff and among students are respectful, supportive and inclusive. Classroom cultures are helping students to focus well on learning. Students report that they feel safe and included.

Community-wide relationships have improved. Parents have increasingly meaningful opportunities to be involved in their children’s learning. The local cluster of schools and a tertiary institution are developing relationships that are improving consistency for students as they progress through their schooling.

The earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 have had a major impact on the well-being of staff, students and their families. A number of school initiatives have had to be put on hold. There is now a strong focus on continuing to develop the school-wide culture that is resulting in improved levels of student achievement.

2. Learning

How well are students learning – engaging, progressing and achieving?

Areas of strength

Student achievement in the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA) has been improving over the last 5 years. In 2011, students achieved well above the level of students in similar schools at Level 1 and Level 3. Significantly more students achieved endorsements for merit and excellence. At level 1, the percentage of students achieving the literacy and numeracy requirements has been gradually improving.

Students who are not undertaking full NCEA courses are provided with meaningful learning programmes and support. Their progress and achievement is monitored as individuals.

Most students are involved in purposeful on-task learning. ERO observed good relationships among students and with their teachers in classrooms and in the wider school environment. Teachers have taken positive steps to improve student engagement. These include:

  • developing respectful relationships between students and teachers
  • focusing on the development of thinking skills
  • regular meetings of teachers to identify student needs, and to develop common strategies to address these needs
  • academic interviews with each senior student each term
  • improved use of different learning opportunities including learning support and extension for gifted and talented students
  • identifying expectations for learning and behaviour that are clearly communicated to students and regularly monitored.

Teachers are well supported through their professional development programme to develop and maintain teaching approaches that reflect current good practice. Teachers of each class meet regularly to share information about the individual needs of students and to make sure that their teaching approaches are consistent.

Areas for development and review

The principal and ERO have identified that the next steps to further support students’ learning and to monitor their progress over time are to:

  • improve the analysis of the data gathered about students who have not entered for full NCEA courses so that their progress and achievement can be monitored and evaluated
  • develop an assessment plan for Years 9 and 10 students
  • analyse data for literacy and numeracy for all students in Years 9 and 10 and set targets for achievement that can be monitored each year
  • review how achievement targets are set and develop annual targets for students at all levels.

How well does the school promote Māori student success and success as Māori?

Areas of strength

Some Māori students are achieving very well at the school. Most of those who participate in NCEA at Year 13 are achieving a Level 3 qualification. In 2011, Year 11 and 12 Māori students achieved merit and excellence endorsed certificates at levels higher than Māori students nationally. However, at all levels, the total proportion of Māori students achieving qualifications is lower than the school average.

The school has been involved in many initiatives to improve Māori achievement. It is currently involved in the He Kākano initiative.

Responsibility for Māori success is shared by many staff, with non-Māori teachers as well as Māori taking an active interest. Māori students participate in the regular academic interviews and mentoring of senior students. In addition, the principal has set up extra consultation with Māori students about what helps them to learn as Māori. This information has been shared and discussed with staff. The board is very aware and supportive of the school’s actions to improve success for Māori.

Areas for development and review

There are increasing numbers of Māori students not participating in NCEA as they move through the senior school, with almost half not participating by Year 13. The school needs to monitor these students more closely to ensure that they have suitable pathways for further education and employment opportunities.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school's vision of caring for students’ well-being, and progressing and individualising their learning is evident in the curriculum and culture of the school. The curriculum is effective in providing a range of meaningful learning pathways for students.

A feature of the curriculum is that there is a shared understanding of the importance of developing values and competencies that underpin successful learning. School-wide goals are further developed within most departments to make them meaningful in different subject contexts. Students increasingly have access to different learning choices as they progress through the school.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to provide ongoing support for students’ learning and well-being, and to make improvements where appropriate.

The principal and board are providing strong leadership. Effective change management is enabling the principal to improve the quality and consistency of teaching practices. He has made clear his high expectations for teaching and learning. These are now being followed by most teachers.

The principal and board chair have increased collaboration among staff, within the leadership team and within the board. The day-to-day management of the school is efficient and effective. There are well-established routines for students and staff.

Areas for development and review

The board, principal and ERO have identified the following areas for development and review to enable the school to continue to improve and sustain its development:

Strategic planning

  • to improve the alignment from the strategic plan, through the annual plan, curriculum delivery plan and department implementation.
  • clarify the expected outcomes from strategic goals at whole school, management and department levels.

Self review

  • to develop a self-review focus within the strategic plan and identify long term and annual priorities

Leadership

ERO supports the following school initiatives:

  • The principal has identified the need to review the roles and responsibilities of senior leaders and heads of departments to give better opportunity for developing shared leadership at all levels.
  • The board has identified the need to complete the development of policies and procedures, with the support of outside providers, so it can continue to effectively lead and support students and staff.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell National Manager Review Services Southern Region

3 May 2012

About the School

Location

Hornby, Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

338

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

464

Gender composition

Boys 54% Girls 46%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Asian

Other Ethnicities

55%

30%

10%

3%

2%

Review team on site

February 2012

Date of this report

3 May 2012

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Supplementary Review

Supplementary Review

June 2009

June 2006

June 2005