Maruia School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

Education institution number:
3204
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
18
Telephone:
Address:

State Highway 65, Maruia

View on map

School Context

Maruia School is a small rural school on the West Coast which provides education for students in Years 1 to 8. The school has a roll of 15 students who learn in a multilevel classroom.

The school’s vision is for all children to experience success, and make a worthwhile and lasting contribution to their world by using learning to grow in confidence and ability. The school values are: ‘respect for self, respect for others and responsibility for our actions’.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing and mathematics
  • progress in relation to the school targets for reading, writing, mathematics and spelling
  • outcomes for students with additional or special learning needs
  • whole school strengths and areas for development in reading, writing, mathematics and spelling.

Since the last ERO review, there have been some changes in staffing. In connection with the local dairy industry, a significant number of students transition into and out of the school each year.

Maruia School is part of the TOSI (Top of the South Island) Kāhui Ako | Community of Learning.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is effective in achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for its students.

School information for 2016 to 2017 shows that most students achieved the school’s expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. In 2018 a large majority of students achieved at expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

The school does not yet analyse learning information to identify if learning is accelerated or not for specific groups of students, including those who remain at the school for shorter periods of time.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The vision and valued learning attributes for students are promoted in the curriculum. These are evident in the way students work collaboratively, their involvement in their learning and their use of the school values of respect for self, others and the environment.

Students are actively involved in making decisions about their learning, including what they learn, how they learn and setting and reviewing their learning goals. The multilevel classroom provides opportunities for students to share their learning and learn from each other. The use of local contexts and individual learning plans provides opportunities for teachers to respond to students’ learning needs and keep them engaged in their learning. Increasing use of digital technologies enhances this engagement, helps to build student agency and allows students to access increased learning opportunities at home and in school.

Educationally powerful connections enhance learning opportunities and engagement in learning. The school has built strong partnerships with other schools on the West Coast and made connections with local community expertise, such as the Department of Conservation, in order to enhance curriculum provision. Partnerships with parents support teaching and learning and help students to make smooth transitions into and out of the school.

Leadership is focused on collaboratively developing and pursuing the school’s vision, goals and targets for equity and excellence. Students are involved in the development of the curriculum and a learning environment that supports learning and engagement. Learning information is analysed and used to identify and plan for student needs and improved achievement.

Internal evaluation is used well to support school improvement. Assessment information is very well used to identify:

  • students who need additional support
  • teaching and learning priorities
  • school wide targets for excellence and equity.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

The board needs to follow a schedule of internal evaluation of key aspects of school operations. This will provide assurance that policies, procedures and curriculum are being enacted as expected.

School leadership has identified, and ERO agrees, that assessment and reporting practices need to be effectively reviewed. This should focus on improving the clarity and accuracy of information about students’ progress and achievement against curriculum levels over time.

Leaders and teachers should extend analysis and reporting on the progress and achievement of students to include:

  • evaluation of the rate of progress students make, particularly those whose learning is targeted for acceleration
  • valued student outcomes in areas other than reading, writing, and mathematics.

3 Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

4 ERO’s Overall Judgement

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO’s overall evaluation judgement of Maruia School’s performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Well placed.

ERO’s Framework: Overall School Performance is available on ERO’s website.

5 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • a vision and valued learning attributes that are promoted in the school’s responsive curriculum
  • educationally powerful connections with other schools, parents and the local community
  • collaborative and improvement-focused leadership.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • evaluating the quality of assessment and reporting practices to improve clarity and accuracy of achievement information and reporting of trends over time
  • evaluation of the rate of progress students make, particularly for those students whose learning needs to be accelerated
  • ensuring that the effective internal evaluation of key aspects of school operations is in place.

Actions for compliance

During the onsite stage of the review, ERO identified non-compliance in relation to:

  • adoption of a statement on the health curriculum in consultation with the community
  • reporting on compliance with the school’s personnel policy
  • maintenance of an ongoing programme of self review in relation to policies, plans and programmes.

In order to address this, the board of trustees must:

  • consult with the school community, at least once in every two years, to adopt a statement on the health curriculum
    [Section 60B Education Act 1989]
  • report in the annual report on the extent of its compliance with the personnel policy on being a good employer (including the equal employment opportunities programme)
    (S77a State Sector Act 1988)
  • implement and maintain an on-going programme of self review in relation to policies, plans and programmes, including evaluation of good quality assessment information on student progress and achievement
    [NAG 2(b)].

Dr Lesley Patterson

Director Review and Improvement Services Te Tai Tini

Southern Region

21 August 2019

About the school

Location

Maruia

Ministry of Education profile number

3204

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

15

Gender composition

Boys 5, Girls 10

Ethnic composition

Māori 1

NZ European/Pākehā 14

Students with Ongoing Resourcing Funding (ORS)

No

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2019

Date of this report

21 August 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2015

Education Review May 2012

Education Review August 2008

Findings

Maruia School is a small, rural school located on the West Coast. Students are highly motivated learners. Most students are achieving very well. The staff work together as a team to support students’ learning and wellbeing. The school’s curriculum extends students’ interests and learning beyond the school environment. The board provides an attractive and safe environment for students and staff. The school is well supported by parents and the community.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Maruia School is a small, rural school located in the Maruia Valley on the West Coast. The school continues to be well resourced with several learning spaces. The roll fluctuates as parents move in and out of the area in search of ongoing employment.

Parents and the wider school community strongly support the school through fund raising and contributing to the school’s programmes. The principal and staff have developed a meaningful relationship with a neighbouring school. This enables students to share knowledge, sporting and cultural experiences with a wider range of students. Teachers are able to exchange professional ideas and moderate the decisions they make about the level of students’ work.

The highly-committed trustees, many with long-standing attachments to the school, have, together with the principal, addressed the issues outlined in the 2012 ERO report. The curriculum is now complete, and clearly outlines the school’s expectations for learning and teaching. An assessment schedule ensures relevant information is consistently gathered.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school effectively uses achievement information to enhance students’ engagement, progress and achievement. The board receives very good achievement data on which to base decisions about resourcing.

Trustees provide significant funding to employ an additional teacher and a teacher aide. This extra staffing contributes to the high levels of student achievement in the school.

Students are highly engaged in learning. They are well motivated by the programmes specifically personalised to meet their interests and needs. They are encouraged to reflect on the quality of their learning and to set further goals to guide their ongoing learning.

Most students (90%) are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. A significant number of students are achieving above the National Standards in reading and writing.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The principal has developed a useful curriculum to guide and support teachers in their planning and teaching. Students, parents and the community have also contributed to its development. The curriculum reflects the values and expectations that families and wider school community have for the students’ learning.

Students’ learning is strongly focused in contexts that are meaningful to them and to meet their individual learning needs. Teachers plan experiences that support students’ progress through the school and on to secondary education. Students also use a wide range of ICT to extend their learning opportunities of the wider world.

The next steps are for the principal to make sure that:

  • the newly-developed curriculum is fully implemented and embedded
  • significant aspects of professional discussions relating to self review, are formally recorded
  • teachers report on student achievement in areas beyond literacy and mathematics.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Māori students are achieving well in reading, writing and mathematics. The school benefits from the expertise of two Māori staff. All students can be involved in kapa haka and regular reo and tikanga Māori lessons. These experiences specifically help Māori students to experience success as Māori. These opportunities also support all students to be inclusive and respectful of those who come from different cultural backgrounds.

The next step is for the principal and staff to consider ways to ensure the sustainability of these good practices.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The staff work well together to support students’ learning, progress and development. The professional leadership group of neighbouring principals provides the principal with constructive opportunities for professional dialogue and collegial support. A close, professional tie with a neighbouring school enables educational, cultural and sporting interactions between students and professional sharing between teachers and principals.

The board works well in collaboration with the principal. Some trustees no longer have children at the school but remain on the board as involved community members with a strong connection and commitment to the local school. They clearly understand their roles and responsibilities and identify their training needs and seek relevant support. The board uses a consultative process to seek the views of students, parents, staff and the wider community when setting out their plans for the school.

The next steps for the board are to:

  • streamline the strategic plan so that it more clearly identifies the school’s priorities and how these priorities will be met
  • maintain the board’s cycle of self review and include reviews of the board’s governance responsibilities
  • strengthen the appraisal of the principal to focus on ongoing improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Maruia School is a small, rural school located on the West Coast. Students are highly motivated learners. Most students are achieving very well. The staff work together as a team to support students’ learning and wellbeing. The school’s curriculum extends students’ interests and learning beyond the school environment. The board provides an attractive and safe environment for students and staff. The school is well supported by parents and the community.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Graham Randell

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern

2 June 2015

About the School

Location

West Coast

Ministry of Education profile number

3204

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

22

Gender composition

Boys 12; Girls 10

Ethnic composition

Pākehā

Māori

19

3

Review team on site

April 2015

Date of this report

2 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

May 2012

August 2008

June 2005