Papanui High School

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Education institution number:
316
School type:
Secondary (Year 9-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
1614
Telephone:
Address:

30 Langdons Road, Papanui, Christchurch

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Findings

How effectively is this school’s curriculum promoting student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

The school highly values and promotes sustained improvement through ongoing reflection, review and innovation. Positive relationships and an ethos of caring contribute to a culture of inclusion and high expectations. Students experience a broad curriculum within and beyond the school. Over time, student achievement is continuing to improve. The wellbeing, engagement and learning progress of students remain high priorities for the board, leaders and staff.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

The school culture and values are most clearly evident in the way students from a range of cultures and backgrounds are included and supported. Student wellbeing is promoted by well-developed pastoral care processes.

School programmes effectively support students with a range of learning needs. The specialist unit for students with high needs remains in strong demand. The school hosts international students. The student roll and staffing levels remain stable.

Very strong relationships are established with the local community through links with local businesses, shared community facilities and adult education programmes. Parents are well informed and included in school programmes and activities. Leaders and staff use local amenities very well to extend learning opportunities for students.

The board and staff have responded well to the recommendations in the 2009 ERO report, with improvements made to teaching approaches and increasing opportunities provided for students to be involved in school initiatives. The school is waiting for confirmation of building developments needed to further support the delivery of its well-developed curriculum.

2. Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The board, leaders and teachers use achievement information very well to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement.

Leaders and teachers have given high priority to implementing a number of school-wide initiatives that focus on identifying and meeting students’ learning needs. There is a strong emphasis on working with each student to identify their learning pathways and appropriate ways to meet them. Students receive effective mentoring to plan for their learning progression within and beyond the school.

Positive relationships between teachers and students help to foster attitudes and skills that enhance engagement in learning. Teachers help students to set high expectations for their learning. Teachers use achievement information well to:

  • adapt programmes to meet individual learning needs
  • identify students who need extra support
  • monitor and report on student progress over time.

Students spoken with by ERO said that teachers consistently go the extra mile outside class hours to support their learning.

Students who require specialist learning support receive high-quality programmes to meet their specific needs. Their progress is closely monitored and changes are made as appropriate. Students’ learning and wellbeing are supported by an experienced teaching team.

Regular reporting of useful engagement and participation information is used effectively to monitor individual student progress. Reports to parents allow them to be more involved in a learning partnership with their children.

Teachers gather a range of learning and wellbeing information from contributing schools and parents when students begin in Year 9. This information is used by teachers to:

  • understand learning needs and provide extra support where necessary
  • set learning programmes at appropriate levels
  • help students to develop their particular interests through the wide range of subject options available in Years 9 and 10.

Achievement information for National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) Level 1 in 2013 shows significant improvement. At this level, results for literacy and numeracy are high. Over recent years, there is a continuing trend of improving academic results across NCEA Levels 2 and 3. The number of NCEA merit and excellence endorsements is increasing.

Leaders are aware of the need to improve the range and use of achievement information gathered for Years 9 and 10 students.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum is very effective in supporting and extending students’ learning and engagement.

The design of the curriculum and how it is timetabled across year levels allows for considerable flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of individual learners. Pathways to further learning and employment are very well supported through the high-quality academic counselling, careers advice and guidance programme. Students in Years 9 and 10 have a wide range of subject options to choose from. Senior students have many choices and opportunities for learning through internal courses, links with tertiary providers, contact with local employers, and the school’s effective work experience programme.

Departments have increased their focus on developing a shared understanding of student learning needs and how courses can be more flexibly delivered to increase student choice. There has been good progress with integrating technologies into classrooms to better support students' learning, and to help senior students track their own progress.

The breadth of learning is substantially increased through the school’s extra-curricular programmes. Students can choose from well-developed programmes in music, the arts, cultural pursuits, sport and outdoor education. These programmes are further enhanced by the access students have to high-quality on-site facilities that have been developed in partnership with the local community. The school is proud of the many local and national awards that students have received through their involvement in these activities.

Teachers are well supported through targeted professional development that focuses on student learning and wellbeing, and how each student can be best supported to succeed. There is an increased focus on improving teachers’ understanding of learning approaches that span all subject areas. The next steps to support this initiative include:

  • continuing to improve teachers’ shared understanding of how thinking, inquiry and key competency skills develop from Year 9 through to Year 13, and how these can be best taught across subject areas
  • developing ways to gather, analyse and report information about thinking, inquiry and key competency skills.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The recent appointment of a new head of Māori builds on a tradition of respect and strong support for te ao Māori in the school. Relationships between whānau, staff and Māori students have helped to sustain positive support and guidance that is contributing to some notable successes. These include:

  • a growing number of students in the whānau class
  • some high levels of success in regional and national cultural competitions that demonstrate the depth of connection and pride that Māori students have in their culture and language
  • well-attended events for whānau and students to acknowledge and celebrate success
  • a trend of improvement in Māori achievement over time.

After a period of significant change, the school is now in a position to:

  • formalise strategic and annual planning to further promote success for Māori, as Māori
  • extend the use of te reo Māori to all classes.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

A strength of the school’s culture is the shared vision and commitment to supporting student learning, progress, achievement and wellbeing. Collaborative practices are evident among trustees, leaders and staff. Students ERO spoke with confirmed that this culture is effective in supporting their learning, wellbeing and opportunities to follow their personal interests.

Trustees bring a range of expertise and skills to the board. They have a good understanding of their governance roles and responsibilities and work collaboratively with leaders to support high-quality learning and teaching. Strategic and annual planning is strong. School goals and achievement targets give clear guidance to leaders and staff.

The quality of senior leadership is professional, well informed and effective in achieving a deliberate focus on the individual learner. The principal has developed a leadership team with individual roles and responsibilities that are clearly defined and well supported. This approach to distributed leadership effectively supports the managing of change, succession planning and sustainability.

Senior leaders work closely with heads of department and other curriculum leaders to encourage and support innovation in learning and teaching. Teachers are given opportunities to use their strengths and interests and to grow their leadership skills. A number of innovative school developments have been willingly shared with other schools.

There is a strong reflective culture school wide. Self-review processes are well established and the outcomes of review are effectively used to improve learning, teaching and the management of school processes. Pilot studies are used purposefully to explore new options and review practices are well informed by research. Head of department reports to the board are detailed and well-considered by trustees. There is a collaborative approach to the analysis and use of achievement information to inform self review.

Parents are kept well informed about school activities and events through regular newsletters. Fortnightly reporting gives parents very good opportunities to become part of the learning partnership with their children. The Parent Teacher Association works closely with leaders and the board to support school developments.

The board and principal have successfully promoted extensive relationships within the local community. Links with local businesses, tertiary providers and community groups have significantly increased opportunities for students to explore pathways for their learning, further study and employment options.

The school and ERO have identified next steps to further strengthen the sustainability of practices. These include:

  • completing the teacher appraisal pilot study and implementing appropriate new procedures to further support reflection and review
  • ensuring all support staff are appraised annually
  • further aligning board goals and targets with department and teacher appraisal goals.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code), established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. ERO verified that these processes had been completed annually.

At the time of this review, there were 42 international students attending the school.

ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school has thorough systems and practices to support and review the quality of students’ wellbeing and education. Students are actively included and involved in all aspects of the school.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The school highly values and promotes sustained improvement through ongoing reflection, review and innovation. Positive relationships and an ethos of caring contribute to a culture of inclusion and high expectations. Students experience a broad curriculum within and beyond the school. Over time, student achievement is continuing to improve. The wellbeing, engagement and learning progress of students remain high priorities for the board, leaders and staff.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services Southern Region

8 October 2014

About the School

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

316

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

1521

Number of international students

42

Gender composition

Girls 53%; Boys 47%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Pacific

Asian

Other ethnicities

63%

15%

4%

11%

7%

Special Features

Special Needs Unit

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

8 October 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

March 2009

October 2005

October 2003

1. About the School

Location 

Papanui, Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

316

School type 

Secondary (Years 9 - 15)

Teaching staff:

Roll generated entitlement

Other

Number of teachers

 

82.34

7.66

105

School roll

1531

Number of international students

66

Gender composition 

Female 51%; Male 49%

Ethnic composition 

NZ European/Pākehā 69% Māori 13% Asian 9% Other Pacific 3% Other European 3% Other African/Middle Eastern 2% Samoan 1%

Special features 

Fully integrated unit for students with intellectual disabilities (Kimi Ora)

ACE funded facility

Review team on site

March 2009

Date of this report

18 May 2009

Previous ERO reports 

Education Reviews October 2005 October 2003 Accountability Review November 1997 Assurance Audit August 1994 Review Report February 1991

 

2. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Papanui High School is a large coeducational secondary school near the Papanui shopping centre. The school has strong connections with the local community, businesses and the city council. These links have helped the school improve its facilities. Students participate in learning and recreation in many newly built spaces and there are further plans for major building upgrades to continue. Since the last review, the school has grown from 1260 to 1531, including 66 international students. The roll includes an increasing number of Māori and Pacific students.

The board, principal and managers lead the school well. They have sustained a positive and improving school culture over the past decade. The school actively develops and maintains a caring culture with an emphasis on respect. Students are friendly, settled and cooperative. They show respect to others and feel respected by their teachers. Students told ERO they are proud of their school. Teachers build good relationships with students, displaying care for their wellbeing and learning. Students are encouraged to achieve to their personal best, both academically and in all areas of their lives. The school is deliberate about developing all the talent of students. Parents and whānau are consulted regularly.

Achievement information shows that students make good progress from the time they begin Year 9. By Year 11, students are achieving in the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) at rates significantly higher than for students in similar schools. In the junior school, teachers use a range of assessments to reliably identify the curriculum levels at which students are performing in their learning. Students are well catered for in the Supported Learning Centre. Students with particular learning needs are identified and targeted for support and mentoring. These students show high levels of success in meeting their goals for achievement in NCEA. The school has had a central focus on raising achievement for all. The overall improvement in NCEA achievement is a direct result of the changed teaching and learning culture of the school. The number of students gaining scholarships is growing.

Students benefit from good to high quality teaching. Teachers participate in ongoing, planned professional development that continues to drive up the quality of teaching. Teachers use effective practices that engage students and encourage them to succeed in a wide range of academic, cultural, sporting and vocational pursuits. Students have many opportunities to learn in relevant learning contexts within and beyond the classroom. Teachers recognise that they can make a difference for students and students know that they can achieve and are expected to aim for excellence. Teachers share with students high expectations for learning and behaviour. Students receive good advice and guidance to encourage them to obtain qualifications and make the transition beyond school to employment or further study.

School leaders have nurtured a reflective culture that is now at the heart of school-wide improvement. Self review forms the basis for the strategic direction of the school and is well connected to all aspects of the life of the school. There is a planned cycle of high quality reporting. Good use is made of information gathered to constantly improve teaching practice. Strong leadership and effective plans to bring about well-considered change combine to build a culture of significant continuous improvement.

Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can manage the school in the interests of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

3. The Focus of the Review

Student Achievement Overall

ERO’s education reviews focus on student achievement. What follows is a statement about what the school knows about student achievement overall.

Over the past 5 years students at Papanui High School have achieved at NCEA Level 1 to increasing levels. In 2008 over 74% of Year 11 students achieved a Level 1 certificate, over 95% reached the numeracy standard and over 82% gained literacy. All these results are well above national results for comparable schools.

Achievement at Level 2 has shown a general increase with over 70% of students gaining a Level 2 certificate in 2007. This was above the percentage achieved in comparable schools nationally. The results in 2008 were not as high but still similar to those achieved in comparable schools nationally.

Level 3 results show a steadily increasing trend but are not yet up to the levels achieved in comparable schools. By contrast, a significant increase in the number of students gaining scholarships in NCEA examinations in Year 13 shows that students are increasingly successful in striving for excellence.

Information gathered over recent years shows that increasing percentages of students are leaving school with higher qualifications. This is true for European/Pākehā students, Māori students and Pacific students.

Information is gathered about students’ ability in literacy and numeracy as they enrol. Students enter Year 9 at the school with lower levels of achievement than in similar schools. However, Papanui High School data shows that by the end of Year 11, the same students have reached and exceeded national expectations for their year level. The school is adding considerable value to students’ levels of progress and achievement. Student success is valued and encouraged. Planned improvements in teaching are having a positive effect on student achievement levels.

School Specific Priorities

Before the review, the board of Papanui High School was invited to consider its priorities for review using guidelines and resources provided by ERO. ERO also used documentation provided by the school to contribute to the scope of the review.

The detailed priorities for review were then determined following a discussion between the ERO review team and the board of trustees. This discussion focused on existing information held by the school (including student achievement and self review information) and the extent to which potential issues for review contributed to the achievement of the students atPapanui High School.

ERO and the board have agreed on the following focus areas for the review:

  • teaching and learning in the junior school; and

  • senior student achievement.

In addition, ERO decided to evaluate:

  • leading and managing change.

ERO’s findings in these areas are set out below.

 

Teaching and Learning in the Junior School

Background

The board suggested and ERO agreed that a focus on teaching and learning in the junior school would enable ERO to evaluate the progress made since the last review. The school has continued to promote improvement in teaching practices as a main platform for improving student achievement.

Many of the areas in this section are also relevant to the next focus area.

Areas of good performance
  • Knowledge of the learner. The school gathers a range of useful information about individual students. All students are assessed early in Year 9 to determine their ability and needs in literacy and numeracy. Class placements are made using both the academic and social information about students. Assessments continue at appropriate times throughout Years 9 and 10. Students requiring additional support are assisted by the Supported Learning Centre. Teachers who teach the core subjects to Year 9 and 10 classes meet regularly to discuss individual student progress and achievement. These teachers also share strategies that have proved successful in engaging students with their learning. The school has an effective system to store, maintain and provide access for all teachers to updated information about individual students’ progress and achievement.

  • Sense of belonging. Students experience a real sense of belonging as a result of the teaching and student management practices. A key part of this for Year 9 students is the well-developed peer support programme. Year 9 students told ERO they appreciated the support, guidance and friendships of senior student peers as they settled into their new school environment. Teachers take care to pronounce students’ names correctly. Groups within the school are valued members of the school community. For instance, the Māori and Pacific students feel their contribution to Papanui High School is respected. The students in the Kimi Ora unit participate in school activities as and when appropriate. Students are aware of the assistance they can receive through the student support staff. Students told ERO they are proud to be students at Papanui High School.

  • Relationships and learning environment. There is a positive tone in the relationships between students and with their teachers. Students spoke about teachers expecting them to succeed and wanting them to excel. Students ERO spoke to appreciate the care teachers show towards them and the extra support teachers give to students’ learning. Teachers promote and sustain students’ self esteem through the management of student behaviour and learning in the classroom. Students are supportive of each other in all aspects of school life. Teachers model positive collaborative relationships for students.

  • Expectations. The school has high expectations for students. These are well understood by teachers and regularly shared with students. Teachers share a belief that all students can achieve. Students are encouraged to aim high and are supported to achieve these aims. The school has continued to increase student attendance and retention rates. Students are expected to be on time for classes, meetings and assemblies. Achievement information shows that more students with this supportive foundation in Years 9 and 10 are leaving school in their senior years with qualifications.

  • Teaching strategies. Students benefit from teaching practices ranging from good to high quality. Best practice was seen when the purpose of the learning and the performance criteria were made clear to students. Students’ progress and achievement is improved when they receive specific feedback about their efforts and next steps in their learning. Teachers in both junior and senior classes are using approaches that encourage students to work cooperatively to discuss issues, present work and/or solve problems. Students’ interest and understanding are enhanced by the use of authentic learning contexts.

Area for improvement
  • Multi-level teaching. Teachers are now in a good position to better cater for the range of abilities and needs within a classroom. The information teachers are gathering and sharing should enable them to continue to develop and improve their planning and teaching for the different levels of ability in classrooms across the school. Teaching students at their point of challenge should be a contributing factor in helping them reach their potential. This is an area that has been identified in the school’s strategic plan as part of increasing the students’ engagement with learning. [Recommendation 6.1]

Senior Student Achievement

Background

The board, senior leaders and teachers have worked together over recent years to increase levels of student achievement in the senior school. NCEA results are included above in the section of this report called Student Achievement Overall. The school has also emphasised for students a broader definition of fully rounded student achievement rather than restrict the focus to academic success.

Areas of good performance
  • Leadership. Students benefit from real opportunities to develop, demonstrate and use leadership skills in a variety of ways from Year 9 to Year 13. Year 13 leaders are trained in a well planned programme, beginning with selection in Year 12 before appointment as mentors, peer supporters for Year 9 students, school councillors or head students. Students represent the various aspects of the school, including sports, the arts and health, on the student leadership teams.

  • Support and initiatives for success. There is a range of effective initiatives to raise the levels of success for students with attendance, achievement and staying on at school to higher levels. Programmes specifically target students who need extra support to increase their levels of attendance, learning and achievement in their first year of NCEA. Year 9 students who show lower levels of ability are targeted and supported to achieve successfully by the end of Year 11. Year 13 students are mentored to assist them with success in their final year. Students are supported in the transition from school to further learning or work.

  • Student success. The school has established a holistic view of achievement and students succeed to increasingly higher levels in NCEA as well as in sporting and cultural fields. Teachers are continuing to find ways to build further on the pattern of improvements in achievement over time. The school acknowledges and celebrates the wide range of achievement by students in fields such as jazz music, touch, kapahaka, and stage challenge as well as in academic achievement.

  • Pastoral care and student wellbeing. The school actively develops and maintains a caring culture with an emphasis on respect for others. Students told ERO that teachers care about them and their learning. The school provides well structured student support services and records show that students make good use of these services throughout the year levels. The principal and teachers have built a school environment that promotes biculturalism and respect for the many nationalities at the school.

  • Use of student achievement information. School leaders and teachers use information about student achievement to increase rates of progress and levels of success for students. Trustees and managers use student achievement information to set targets, examine the impact of teaching strategies on students’ progress and align their review of effectiveness with the strategic goals of the school. The head of each department reports to the trustees about where there can be changes to teaching so that higher levels of student achievement can be reached.

  • Opportunities for learning. Students participate in an increasing and flexible range of opportunities to learn and achieve. Teachers with expert subject knowledge and increased levels of skill are increasing student engagement through a range of questioning strategies, higher order thinking skills and cooperative learning approaches. Students benefit from their experience of the internet and intranet, multi-level learning and authentic learning contexts. Teachers are supported in departments by documentation showing how to use a variety of teaching strategies to improve student achievement.

Area for improvement
  • Students’ understanding of learning. Teachers could increase students’ understanding of the learning process. Teachers are using a greater range of strategies to engage students in their learning. The next step is for students to take more responsibility for their learning and achievement. Students are likely to benefit from having a greater voice in their learning; a fuller understanding of the learning process; a greater awareness of their achievement and progress; and a fuller role in evaluating their own learning. [Recommendation 6.2]

Leading and Managing Change

Background

The school has been working to improve the quality of the learning environment during the last six years. At the on-site stage of the review, ERO suggested and the board agreed to add a third area focusing on leadership and management. ERO wanted to evaluate the work of school trustees and leaders in the development of a culture that promotes and sustains excellence in both learning and teaching.

Areas of good performance
  • Leadership. A strong and effective team leads and manages the school. The board provides a sound strategic direction for the school, focused on raising achievement for students and teachers. The principal and senior leadership team have clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Leaders work collaboratively to sustain school development. Leadership is distributed across the school and is nurtured through a leadership development programme. For example, one member of staff is invited to join the senior leadership team for a fixed term. Teachers have access to extended study leave.

  • Self review. The school adopts and implements a strategic approach to comprehensive self review to build continuous sustainable improvement. There are strong connections between the strategic vision of the school, the annual goals, departmental goals, staff performance appraisal and professional development. Self review is informed by a wide range of information including departmental annual reports, student achievement data, attitudinal surveys, perception surveys and consultation with the community. Outcomes from a current review cycle inform the next set of annual goals. Ongoing communication of progress towards and success in achieving the annual goals helps make self review relevant to staff and the board. The well-developed culture of self review is evident in all areas of the school.

  • Professional learning and development (PLD). Teachers are engaged effectively in a range of planned opportunities for PLD to raise achievement and engagement in learning for all students. The school leaders have adopted a flexible approach where teachers are able to choose from a number of individual professional development initiatives. This has led to teachers’ engagement with and commitment to ongoing improvement in their teaching. The PLD programme is based on reliable research, fits well with the strategic direction of the school, and is sustainable. There is now a rich understanding of how the teaching process can improve outcomes for students. The school is leading a cluster of schools to improve student achievement through improved teaching practices.

4. Areas of National Interest

Overview

ERO provides information about the education system as a whole to Government to be used as the basis for long-term and systemic educational improvement. ERO also provides information about the education sector for schools, parents and the community through its national reports.

To do this ERO decides on topics and investigates them for a specific period in all applicable schools nationally.

During the review of Papanui High School, ERO investigated and reported on the following areas of national interest. The findings are included in this report so that information about the school is transparent and widely available.

The Achievement of Māori Students: Progress

In this review, ERO evaluated the progress the school has made since the last review in improving the achievement of Māori students and in initiatives designed to promote improved achievement. Papanui High School has 192 students who identify as Māori. These students make up 13% of the school roll.

Findings

At the time of the 2005 Education Review, the school had put in place a wide range of initiatives to raise the achievement of Māori students. These initiatives and additional plans are part of the effective strategy undertaken to bring about the planned goal of raising the achievement of Māori students. These initiatives included vertical form classes Māori students can belong to, a whare for a variety of activities (including pöwhiri for manuhiri), increasing the number of Māori teaching staff, and participation by all teachers in PLD about how to teach Māori students more effectively. Some teachers were attending classes in te reo Māori. These initiatives have been maintained and added to. Senior managers are receiving whaikōrero lessons to support them when welcoming visitors to their school. A mentoring programme has been implemented to increase the representation by Māori in the student leadership team. This has been successful, as Māori students have held head student positions in 2008 and 2009.

The school continues to provide a supportive learning environment for its Māori students. They continue to enjoy positive relationships with their teachers and peers. Māori students told ERO they appreciate the support they receive from their teachers. Several students have been and are part of the “engage programme”. This programme identifies students who teachers believe have the potential to gain their Level 1 NCEA credits, then supports and mentors them throughout the year. This programme had a 100% success rate in 2008. ERO also heard about and observed very caring and supportive tuakana-teina relationships. Māori students say that teachers have high expectations for their behaviour and achievement.

Since the 2005 ERO review, Māori student achievement levels have improved. In 2005, 31% of Māori students in Year 11 gained Level 1 NCEA. In 2008, 66% gained their Level 1 credits. The retention rates for these students have also improved. All Māori students who started Year 9 in 2006 have remained at school for their Year 11 course of study. Of the 47 Māori students who started school in 2005, 89% are still attending Papanui High School. Attendance rates for Māori students have improved. The percentage of Māori students leaving school with qualifications is increasing.

The mana of Māori students in cocurricular activities has increased. Haka pöwhiri are a well-established part of the school’s protocols. They are accepted and enjoyed by the full student body. In 2008, the school’s kapahaka group qualified for the secondary schools’ national kapahaka championships. Students are able to have their expertise and knowledge recognised by gaining NCEA credits from their work in kapahaka.

The school is looking at ways to increase the numbers of Māori students in the whānau groups, kapahaka and te reo Māori classes. One proposed initiative is to include a cultural studies module for all Year 9 students. Leading teachers continue to develop approaches to increase the involvement of parents in their children’s education and school activities in general. They acknowledge that large numbers of whānau are present at sporting and kapahaka events.

Senior leaders and teachers use many concepts that reflect the Māori view of learning and support. As their understanding of these concepts grows, it is likely that they will be able to appreciate and use the concepts relating to the special abilities and attributes prized by Māori when identifying Māori gifted and talented students.

The Achievement of Pacific Students: Progress

In this review ERO evaluated the progress the school has made since the last review in improving the achievement of its Pacific students and in initiatives designed to promote improved achievement. The number of Pacific students continues to grow with this group now forming over 4% of the school roll.

Areas of good performance
  • High expectations and support of students. Pacific students know that teachers believe in them and expect them to achieve. Students are expected to be in class. They told ERO that teachers genuinely care for them and their learning. Since the last review, achievement levels in NCEA have continued to improve. More Pacific students are successfully achieving level two NCEA standards. The school has appointed a person designated to Pacific students for advice and guidance. The Pacific students told ERO that they feel equal with their non-Pacific peers.

  • Fostering pride in Pacific culture. Pacific students are honoured at the school and are proud to be part of it. There is a significant intersection of Māori and Pacific culture and an acknowledgement of both cultures. Students are nurtured in leadership and mentored. For example, the current head boy was part of the “engage” programme in Year 11 when the principal worked with him to help him pass NCEA level 1. He is now exercising strong leadership within the school and providing a role model to other students in leadership.

Area for further improvement
  • Promotion of Pacific culture. Pacific students would like their culture to have a higher profile in the school. For example, they suggested displaying Pacific artwork at various places around the school. [Recommendation 6.3]

Implementing the New Zealand Curriculum in 2010

Progress to date

In preparing for teaching the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) in 2010 the school has:

  • reviewed current practice and programmes to identify what has worked well and what the next developmental steps might be;

  • consulted the community and developed the vision for the school;

  • provided professional development so that teachers are familiar with the NZC document;

  • consulted the staff, students and parents about the key values;

  • included two values per term in the planning for student activities;

  • visited contributing schools to learn what they are doing about the revised NZC and developed alignment to make transition for new students as smooth as possible;

  • become involved in the Numeracy Project to help students in Year 9 experience a continuity of approach;

  • begun to include key competencies in planning; and

  • explored opportunities for authentic learning.

Next steps

The school has decided that its priorities for preparation over the next three to six months are for:

  • more internal and external professional development about the NZC;

  • departments to refine plans to align with the NZC;

  • teachers to continue evaluating and reviewing the effectiveness of the changes made and to determine sustainability of such changes; and

  • teachers in the senior school to explore a variety of pathways for student careers through the community and courses in an effort to maximise opportunities for learning.

Thinking about the Future

ERO is currently discussing with secondary schools how they are thinking about the future and what it might mean for their students.

The school reports that it has thought about the future and what it might mean for their students in the following ways.

  • Schools provide a cohesive quality to the community, therefore will always be relevant.

  • Schools will change to meet the characteristics of Generation Y and Z.

  • Schools will need to provide authentic learning contexts. For example, learning and teaching will take place within and beyond the school in partnership with organisations in the community and through cross-curricular (integrated) studies.

  • The barriers between the school and the community will be broken down so that students and adults have a choice of night or day school depending on what is appropriate for them; school and community facilities will be shared; and partnerships with businesses will be forged.

  • There will be greater cooperation and less competition between schools so that resources and classes are shared. Closer links with contributing schools are being developed.

  • Building developments are being future-proofed to ensure buildings are used effectively and economically.

  • Schools in the future will have increased multiculturalism and internationalisation.

Some steps have already been taken to prepare students for the future as outlined above but this is a work in progress. The building of new schools in the locality in the next ten years would impact on the current schools, the rolls and possible philosophies and emphases.

Provision for International Students

Compliance with the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Studentsand the Provision of English Language Support

Papanui High School is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students(the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. This is a requirement of all schools that enrol international students in terms of the Act. Schools are also required to provide English language support for their international students.

The school complies with all aspects of the Code.

Areas of good performance
  • Pastoral care. Students benefit from well-resourced pastoral care processes and systems. The new, full-time Director of International Students provides a thorough orientation programme for students on arrival. She makes herself available to students in a centrally located, well-resourced and cheerful office area. A support person assists with documentation and student services, and is always available for student inquiries. A dean works with the director to provide additional support for students in academic, social and emotional matters. Students are provided with a New Zealand buddy to help them settle in on arrival. The homestay coordinator works effectively with students and their caregivers. She has a good knowledge of the host families, makes herself available to students at all times, and is able to monitor the wellbeing of students and families. Students are well integrated into all school activities.

  • Support for learning. Students are supported in their learning in a number of ways. After initial assessments they are placed in an appropriate ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) class. An orientation class is available for students who have limited English. Various courses with appropriate assessments are available to students, and they are encouraged to achieve their literacy requirements for NCEA. Students also receive additional support in English and other subjects through the work of the teacher aides. Students join form classes with other New Zealand students. The director and the dean ensure that form and subject teachers are kept well informed about the needs of the students. Electronic files now provide up-to-date information that can be easily shared. Students benefit from supportive relationships with their teachers.

  • Reflective practice. Annual reports to the board, and good quality documentation indicate that the staff in the international department are working to improve outcomes for students, and for the school. Strategic and business planning, and analysis of areas for improvement have ensured that the organisation, systems and processes achieve compliance with the code and the goal of improving practice. A new director has been appointed to continue to work with the board and principal in extending international links and opportunities that are likely to benefit international and New Zealand students.

Area for improvement
  • Reporting to the board. Staff could extend the way that they review the effectiveness of their programmes by seeking anonymous feedback from students. They could also include analysed student achievement information in their reports to the board. Providing analysed data and evidence will further guide their self review and provide the board with assurance of the quality of provision and outcomes for students. [Recommendation 6.4]

Adult and Community Education (ACE): Meeting Quality Assurance Arrangements

Papanui High School is funded to provide ACE programmes and must meet the requirements of the ACE Quality Assurance Arrangements for Providers of Adult and Community Education.

The school has attested that it meets all these requirements.

5. Board Assurance on Compliance Areas

Overview

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of Papanui High School completed an ERO Board Assurance Statement andSelf-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration;

  • curriculum;

  • management of health, safety and welfare;

  • personnel management;

  • financial management; and

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on students’ achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment);

  • physical safety of students;

  • teacher registration;

  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions; and

  • attendance.

Each school needs to acknowledge that bullying is a risk to be managed. This school has surveyed students, is aware of the issues around bullying and has put a wide range of systems in place to support students. Students know about this support and have ready access to it. Peer mentors selected from Year 13 receive in-depth training. Mentoring and mixed-year-level pastoral groupings build positive, supportive relationships. Junior students told ERO that they value the peer support they receive from the senior students.

 

Compliance

 

ERO’s investigations did not identify any areas of concern.

6. Recommendations

ERO and the board have developed the following recommendations. 

  • senior managers and teachers extend practices to provide clearly stated different levels of challenge for students within class programmes;

  • teachers provide more ways to involve students in a fuller understanding of, and voice in, their own learning, achievement and progress;

  • the school investigate ways to promote Pacific culture; and

  • senior managers and teachers extend the review and reporting procedures about the provision and outcomes for international students.

7. Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can manage the school in the interests of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

 

Isabell Sinclair Irwin

Area Manager for Chief Review Officer

18 May 2009

 

 

To the Parents and Community of Papanui High School

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Papanui High School.

Papanui High School is a large coeducational secondary school near the Papanui shopping centre. The school has strong connections with the local community, businesses and the city council. These links have helped the school improve its facilities. Students participate in learning and recreation in many newly built spaces and there are further plans for major building upgrades to continue. Since the last review, the school has grown from 1260 to 1531, including 66 international students. The roll includes an increasing number of Māori and Pacific students.

The board, principal and managers lead the school well. They have sustained a positive and improving school culture over the past decade. The school actively develops and maintains a caring culture with an emphasis on respect. Students are friendly, settled and cooperative. They show respect to others and feel respected by their teachers. Students told ERO they are proud of their school. Teachers build good relationships with students, displaying care for their wellbeing and learning. Students are encouraged to achieve to their personal best, both academically and in all areas of their lives. The school is deliberate about developing all the talent of students. Parents and whānau are consulted regularly.

Achievement information shows that students make good progress from the time they begin Year 9. By Year 11, students are achieving in the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) at rates significantly higher than for students in similar schools. In the junior school, teachers use a range of assessments to reliably identify the curriculum levels at which students are performing in their learning. Students are well catered for in the Supported Learning Centre. Students with particular learning needs are identified and targeted for support and mentoring. These students show high levels of success in meeting their goals for achievement in NCEA. The school has had a central focus on raising achievement for all. The overall improvement in NCEA achievement is a direct result of the changed teaching and learning culture of the school. The number of students gaining scholarships is growing.

Students benefit from good to high quality teaching. Teachers participate in ongoing, planned professional development that continues to drive up the quality of teaching. Teachers use effective practices that engage students and encourage them to succeed in a wide range of academic, cultural, sporting and vocational pursuits. Students have many opportunities to learn in relevant learning contexts within and beyond the classroom. Teachers recognise that they can make a difference for students and students know that they can achieve and are expected to aim for excellence. Teachers share with students high expectations for learning and behaviour. Students receive good advice and guidance to encourage them to obtain qualifications and make the transition beyond school to employment or further study.

School leaders have nurtured a reflective culture that is now at the heart of school-wide improvement. Self review forms the basis for the strategic direction of the school and is well connected to all aspects of the life of the school. There is a planned cycle of high quality reporting. Good use is made of information gathered to constantly improve teaching practice. Strong leadership and effective plans to bring about well-considered change combine to build a culture of significant continuous improvement.

Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can manage the school in the interests of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of school performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to student achievement and useful to this school.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the school or see the ERO website, http://www.ero.govt.nz.

Isabell Sinclair Irwin

Area Manager for Chief Review Officer

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT REVIEWS

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve educational achievement in schools; and

  • provide information to parents, communities and the Government.

Reviews are intended to focus on student achievement and build on each school’s self review.

Review Focus

ERO’s framework for reviewing and reporting is based on three review strands.

  • School Specific Priorities – the quality of education and the impact of school policies and practices on student achievement.

  • Areas of National Interest – information about how Government policies are working in schools.

  • Compliance with Legal Requirements – assurance that this school has taken all reasonable steps to meet legal requirements.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of school performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to student achievement and useful to this school.

Review Recommendations

Most ERO reports include recommendations for improvement. A recommendation on a particular issue does not necessarily mean that a school is performing poorly in relation to that issue. There is no direct link between the number of recommendations in this report and the overall performance of this school.