Impressions Childcare Centre

Education institution number:
30291
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
124
Telephone:
Address:

805 Crozier Street, Pirongia

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1 Evaluation of Impressions Childcare Centre

How well placed is Impressions Childcare Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Impressions Childcare Centre is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Impressions Childcare Centre is a large, privately owned, full-day, education and care service located in the rural village of Pirongia. The centre operates four aged-based rooms with separate outdoor spaces. It is licensed for 143 children including 40 children aged up to two years. The current roll of 144 children includes 26 children who identify as Māori and several children from a range of ethnic groups.

The centre manager and team leaders together manage and lead centre operations. The philosophy promotes trusting and reciprocal relationships in an environment where meaningful responses empower children and adults.

Since the September 2016 evaluation, management and teachers have undertaken professional development to further their knowledge and understanding of bicultural practices and some of the strategic priorities for the centre.

The Review Findings

Children experience positive interactions with their teachers. Literacy, mathematics and science are naturally integrated throughout the programme. Babies and toddlers benefit from routines that are responsive to their individual preferences and needs. Children are given time and space to lead their own learning in a calm and settled environment. Strong relationships with the local school and the key teacher approach support children to transition positively into, within the centre and on to school. Children with additional needs are supported through individualised planning and responsive practice. A strong sense of belonging and wellbeing is evident for children in a family-based environment.

Purposeful learning experiences promote positive learning outcomes for children. Parents' views and aspirations for their children are gathered and used in individualised planning and assessment of learning. Children's learning progress is visible in their individual portfolios. The age-based learning environments are attractive, well-resourced and intentionally planned by teachers to invite children to explore. Children are supported to build their knowledge about New Zealand’s unique cultural heritage through the use of te reo Māori in context with learning experiences. Teachers should further strengthen ways for multi-cultural families, including Pacific to relate to their culture and identity within the centre. The centre philosophy is highly evident in relationships, the curriculum and teachers' practice. Children enjoy learning in meaningful contexts.

Leaders promote a positive culture of teaching and learning. Teachers participate in regular professional learning and development. Leaders promote responsive and reflective practice. There is effective and regular communication between leaders, teaching teams and parents on the progress and development of their child. Emergent leadership is encouraged. Teachers feel well supported in their role.

Internal evaluation is valued and leads to improved outcomes for children. Policies and systems have been developed to guide centre operations. There is a need for management to take a strategic approach to centre operations including a more robust review of policies. The current appraisal process requires strengthening. Priority should now be given to support teachers to strengthen their knowledge of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki. The centre's annual goals are identified and now need further development to align the centre's strategic direction.

Key Next Steps

The next steps for Impressions Childcare Centre managers are to strengthen the:

  • appraisal process, including observations of teaching practice to build the capability of teachers

  • leadership of learning to keep up with current research practices and the revised New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum

  • alignment of the strategic and annual plan

  • robustness of policy review.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Impressions Childcare Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

ERO identified areas of non-compliance relating to health and safety. To meet requirements the service needs to improve its performance in the following areas:

  • include earth quake and lock down drills as part of regular emergency drills

  • accident records to include evidence that parents have been informed

  • to ensure that excursion documentation includes adult-to-child ratios on the parental permission approval document.

[Licensing Criteria for Early Childhood Education and Care Centres 2008, HS8, HS27, HS17]

In order to improve practice, the service should:

  • undertake regular review of policies and procedures to meet current legal requirements.

Darcy Te Hau

Acting Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region - Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

12 March 2020

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Pirongia, Waikato

Ministry of Education profile number

30291

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

143 children, including up to 40 aged under 2

Service roll

144

Gender composition

Male 51% Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other ethnic groups

18%
78%
4%

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

November 2019

Date of this report

12 March 2020

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2016

Education Review

September 2013

Education Review

November 2010

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Impressions Childcare Centre

How well placed is Impressions Childcare Centre to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Impressions Childcare Centre is a large privately owned, full-day, education and care service located in the rural village of Pirongia. It caters for children from six months to school age and is organised in to three age-group settings, for children under two years, over two years and a preschool. At the time of this ERO review 148 children were enrolled, which includes 22 of Māori descent.

The centre manager, the owner who is a registered teacher and team leaders together manage and lead centre operations, the curriculum and teaching practice. The philosophy promotes trusting and reciprocal relationships in an environment where meaningful responses empower children and adults.

Since ERO's last review in 2013 the centre philosophy has been reviewed in consultation with staff, parents and whānau. This has included a revised statement of vision, values and beliefs.

The Review Findings

The centre philosophy is highly evident in relationships, the curriculum and teachers' practice. Through collaborative and ongoing review, shared values and beliefs, desired outcomes for children engaging in a play-based curriculum have been established. It is timely to give consideration to reflecting the centre's commitment to New Zealand's bicultural focus in the philosophy.

Centre management has established a strong and effective framework for self review. Ongoing monitoring of systems and practices enables management and teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of planned centre developments. This effective self review results in improved practices that indicate shared understandings among teachers and enhanced outcomes for children.

The centre manager and owner have developed an effective approach to centre-wide leadership. Features of this approach include:

  • maximising individual's skills, knowledge and expertise

  • clear, consistent, shared, and high expectations

  • relationships based on mutual trust and respect

  • meaningful responses to the ideas and aspirations of staff, parents and families

  • consideration of current educational theory, and professional learning and development.

Team leaders in each area effectively grow teachers' capability. They readily engage teachers in professional conversations and support them through focused coaching and mentoring. Teachers feel valued and confident to contribute to this professional sharing and feedback. Effective leadership of learning in a positive, respectful and reflective team culture is contributing to positive outcomes for children in calm, settled and engaging learning environments.

Children benefit from a well-designed curriculum that is informed by teachers' collective knowledge and understanding of the learning and development of babies, toddlers and young children. The importance of parents and whānau knowledge and aspirations are valued, and contribute to the strong links between children's homes, the centre and wider community. The centre has developed strong systems and practices for assessment, planning and evaluation for individuals and groups of children. Well-documented assessment and planning for children includes teacher responses, parent voice and continuity of learning overtime. These processes have been greatly enhanced by the use of digital technologies that have advanced opportunities for parents to make meaningful and ongoing contributions to their children's learning.

The centre provides high quality learning environments for each age group. Environments are carefully designed and resourced to reflect children's different ages and interests, and encourage their critical thinking, wonderings and creativity. Teachers consistently ensure that children have access to all areas of play. They provide interesting and challenging opportunities that invite children to explore and become fully involved in a wide variety of experiences.

Teachers use a range of effective strategies to promote children's learning. They skilfully use open questions and in-depth conversations to encourage children to express their ideas and extend their thinking. Teachers value Māori language and culture. They use te reo Māori, integrate aspects of tikanga and stories of significance to tangata whenua. Teachers acknowledge the importance of strengthening the use of te reo Māori and bicultural practices across the centre.

Teachers have created a welcoming and friendly atmosphere across the centre. Their relationships and interactions with children, families, and one another are characterised by care, respect and reciprocity. Routines, particularly in the under two's area, are attuned to the personal rhythm of each child, and teachers intentionally take time to allow babies to set their own pace. The importance of children developing social confidence and competence is emphasised across the centre. Teachers value and promote effective communication and oral language as the basis for children to be confident and successful learners now and in the future. Teachers skilfully integrate aspects of literacy, mathematics, science, and the arts in contexts that are meaningful to children's interests in the play-based curriculum. Children's positive transition to school is well supported through professional information sharing, and valuing parents as partners in their children's learning.

Key Next Steps

After a period of centre growth and expansion it is timely to more formally develop and document strategic priorities for the centre. It will be important to consider and include goals and aspirations in relation to bicultural understandings and practice, curriculum development and associated teaching approaches.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Impressions Childcare Centre completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Impressions Childcare Centre will be in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato/Bay of Plenty

16 September 2016

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Pirongia, Waikato

Ministry of Education profile number

30291

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

110 children, including up to 20 aged under 2

Service roll

148

Gender composition

Boys 82 Girls 66

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Samoan

Other European

22

124

1

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:7

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2016

Date of this report

16 September 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

September 2013

Education Review

November 2010

Education Review

October 2007

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.