St Claudine Thevenet School

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Summary

St Claudine Thevenet School is an integrated Catholic school in Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt. The school caters for students from Years 1 to 8. Of the 264 students, 22% are Māori, 38% Pacific, 22% Pākehā and 15% Asian.

The school’s vision is to be a community that strives for excellence and parents and whānau are actively engaged in their child’s learning journey. Clearly established values and curriculum principles link to the school’s special Catholic character.

The school has maintained a stable leadership team from the April 2013 ERO report. Previously identified strengths have been sustained.

The school is part of the Hutt Faith Based Kāhui Ako|Community of Learning.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Effective processes are in place to enable the achievement of equity and excellence for all children. Well-established systems and practices are rigorously implemented to meet the individual learning needs of students.

Most students enter the school requiring their progress to be accelerated to achieve in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Significant progress is made by individuals over time. The overall pattern of achievement is consistent, with nearly all students achieving the National Standard in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 8. Disparity in achievement between boys on entry at five years of age, when compared to girls, is reduced by Year 4 and successfully addressed by the end of Year 8.

Learners are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school responds very effectively to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Comprehensive processes ensure that individual learners requiring acceleration are identified, targeted and monitored. Leaders and teachers know students well, scrutinising assessment information to develop a wide-ranging response to specific needs. Collaborative inquiry assists teachers and leaders to develop a collective understanding of how best to address the needs of students in the classroom.

Teachers regularly analyse achievement data to look at the progress of targeted students. They choose teaching strategies designed to accelerate learning and achievement. Parents, students and teachers work together to develop shared goals and plans to promote ongoing progress.

Students with additional and complex needs receive appropriate support. Individual education plans establish relevant goals to address individual needs. Resourcing for additional needs, including the provision for English Language Learners, is timely and appropriate. Tracking and monitoring processes are comprehensive and ongoing. External agency involvement is appropriately accessed.

Equity and excellence is evident in the school’s comprehensive response to Māori and Pacific students’ cultural success. Knowledgeable internal leadership effectively guides promotion of cultural success through the delivery of the school curriculum. Families, Māori whānau and aiga play pivotal roles in sharing their cultural aspirations and celebrating cultural diversity in the school and wider community.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

School processes are highly effective in enabling the achievement of equity and excellence.

Curriculum design and delivery is innovative and responds well to the emerging and developing capabilities of learners. Foundational learning in the early years of schooling helps to foster collaborative and self-directed learning for individuals as they move through to Year 8. Curriculum integration is well supported through the use of digital technologies. Meaningful student engagement is fostered through authentic learning experiences.

Teachers are reflective practitioners. Relevant guidelines provide clear expectations for teaching and learning. Desired teacher practice is clearly understood by staff and reinforced through collaborative discussion, regular observational feedback and the use of critical thinking tools to reflect on the impact of classroom practice on student outcomes. Teaching guidelines are well aligned to agreed curriculum philosophies which place students at the centre of teaching and learning.

Comprehensive performance management processes effectively monitor and build the quality of teacher practice. The principal meets teachers termly, discussing the achievement of targeted learners. This high level professional support encourages critical reflection.

Highly inclusive environments promote student wellbeing and engagement in school life. Student leadership in decision making ensures learners contribute in the selection of curriculum experiences and their ownership of shared school values. Positive, affirming relationships between students and their peers fosters an open and welcoming environment.

Leadership effectively guides curriculum innovation and delivery. Senior leaders demonstrate a relentless focus on achieving equity and excellence for students. Leaders use well developed processes to continually monitor and support teachers in achieving positive outcomes for students, families and whānau.

Trustees use reported information to ensure their resourcing is targeted to achieve equity and excellence for students. Strategic and annual goals clearly link to the school’s ongoing priorities. Engagement of the community is valued and considered in school decision making. A recent evaluation of governance practice has identified clear developments to build the capability of new trustees and further contribute to effective stewardship.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Well-developed systems and practices are effectively implemented to achieve positive outcomes for all students. The school and ERO agree the next steps are to:

  • review assessment moderation guidelines to include the learning progressions framework

  • embed the use of the schools’ internal evaluation model to support curriculum and strategic evaluation.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving excellent educational outcomes. School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

Agreed next steps are:

  • review aspects of assessment guidelines

  • embed the school’s internal evaluation model.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Patricia Davey Deputy

Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

3 November 2017

About the school

Location

Wainuiomata

Ministry of Education profile number

3018

School type

State Integrated Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

264

Gender composition

Female 56%, Male 44%

Ethnic composition

Māori 22%
Pacific 38%
Pākehā 22%
Asian 15%
Other ethnic groups 3%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

3 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, April 2013
Education Review, March 2010
Education Review, February 2007

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

St Claudine Thevenet School is an integrated Catholic school in Wainuiomata, catering for students from Years 1 to 8. The multicultural roll includes 39% Pacific students and 18% Māori.

Learning within a culture of Catholic traditions and values is paramount for leaders and staff. They model the school's core values of respect, honesty, commitment and teamwork.

A strong sense of honouring biculturalism permeates the school. Proprietors and trustees place importance on inclusive practice in this richly diverse, multicultural school. Visitors are welcomed by students with a mihi whakatau. A culture of respect for all, by acknowledging mana, is engrained in school life.

Pastoral care is a strength. Teachers maintain a nurturing, holistic overview of students’ wellbeing. Teachers know students and their families well.

Student input is valued. Promotion of leadership is seen as pivotal to supporting successful 21st century learners and preparing them for secondary school. Students present to trustees and the board chairperson attends their council meetings.

The school has a very good ERO reporting history. Recommendations from the March 2010 ERO report have been considered thoughtfully and responded to effectively. A strong focus on student achievement emphasises that all students will reach their individual potential and level of excellence.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Students engage in their learning with interest and motivation. They demonstrate ownership, knowledgeably discussing their aspirations and identifying their next learning steps.

All students are provided with many opportunities to be culturally successful. Their academic needs are considered and responded to appropriately. In 2011, a strategic approach to increasing cultural awareness and raising Pacific student achievement was undertaken. This has led to improved success and achievement. Teachers monitor progress carefully, guided in their professional discussions by the principles of the Pacific Education Plan.

A variety of assessment tools is used to measure student progress throughout the year and to track groups of students over time. Achievement data is rigorously analysed to identify patterns of performance across the school and inquire into these. Self-review processes support teachers to maximise success for all learners.

Achievement information reported shows that most students are achieving at or above the National Standards expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. Results are highest in reading. Students requiring reading assistance receive targeted intervention to accelerate progress. Data indicates that a positive difference is made for these learners. Leaders and teachers have appropriately identified that writing is an area for increased focus and professional development.

Schoolwide literacy and mathematics information indicates progress over the past two years for Māori and Pacific as groups and accelerated progress for some individuals. Most Māori and Pacific students are currently achieving at or above the National Standards expectations. Teaching is impacting positively on learning and achievement.

Students with additional needs are effectively provided for with well-designed processes for identification and support. Comprehensive learning and social needs registers record assistance, actions taken and outcomes. The special education needs coordinator has developed collaborative links with a number of external agencies. Transition to secondary schools is well managed.

The learning needs of students who are English language learners are specifically identified. Effective programmes are based on student needs and regularly monitored. Teacher and teacher-aides work in partnership.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The curriculum effectively interweaves the Catholic character with the principles, values and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum. Learners are placed at the centre of programme design. Teachers provide purposeful and meaningful contexts for learning, particularly in integrated studies.

Curriculum documentation guides delivery and is regularly reviewed. Teachers plan collaboratively and effectively to respond to students' interests and needs. A culturally responsive curriculum reflects the languages, cultures and identities of all students.

A strong culture of staff learning promotes collaboration and improvement. Teachers share research and evidence-based reflections to revisit their practice and foster student learning and achievement. This work is well supported by leaders' observations and discussions of their teaching.

High quality teaching across classrooms challenges and motivates students. Effective strategies include:

  • fostering independent learning
  • students self-selecting relevant activities
  • shared cooperative learning
  • authentically empowering students to be part of their own learning and assessment
  • valuing the importance of relationships as an integral part of successful teaching and learning.

There is a welcoming atmosphere where high expectations for learning and behaviour are well understood. A tuakana teina ethos is valued. Students have mutual respect and concern for each other.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Trustees, leaders and staff give high priority to improving Māori student achievement. The board funded staff participation in a marae-based symposium on driving educational success for Māori.

Partnerships with whānau are valued and their input is actively sought. School personnel are guided in their work by a collaboratively developed plan for promoting Māori student success. There is a clear focus on nurturing Māori learners to successfully participate and contribute to te ao Māori.

Self review continuously informs the school about the impact of strategies implemented. As a result, the school is highly effective in its endeavours. A particularly noteworthy example is the ongoing focus on teachers reflecting and developing their practices to cater for different learning styles and needs. A Māori achievement leader has been appointed in 2013 to provide further leadership and expertise.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

St Claudine Thevenet School is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Factors promoting sustainability and capacity-building are:

  • effective governance. The board governs strategically and reflectively. Trustees are well informed about outcomes for students, particularly priority learners. They make good use of achievement information to set relevant improvement targets. Trustees are highly supportive of teachers and students
  • effective leadership from the principal and senior team. Members are improvement-focused and communicate a clear vision for the school. There is a coordinated and collegial approach to improving outcomes for students
  • a robust and developmental appraisal process to support achievement of student outcomes
  • ongoing use of evaluation and self review to sustain and improve school performance
  • active community engagement by parents, whānau and aiga in school matters that contribute to promoting success for children.

Agreed priorities

Through self review, leaders know that immediate priorities for consolidation and refinement are a continued focus on enhancing:

  • teachers’ understanding and ability to use culturally responsive teaching practices that promote the language, culture and identity of Māori and Pacific children
  • parent partnership in children’s learning
  • alignment of class and intervention programmes
  • teachers’ understanding of the process of high quality curriculum review.

ERO’s evaluation findings affirm these directions.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region (Acting)

16 April 2013

Image removed.About the School

Location

Wainuiomata, Lower Hutt

Ministry of Education profile number

3018

School type

State Integrated Full Primary (Year 1 to 8)

School roll

254

Gender composition

Female 57%, Male 43%

Ethnic composition

Pacific

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other ethnic groups

39%

30%

18%

13%

Review team on site

February 2013

Date of this report

16 April 2013

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

March 2010

February 2007