BestStart Greerton

Education institution number:
30082
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
48
Telephone:
Address:

169A Maleme Street, Greerton, Tauranga

View on map

1 Evaluation of ABC Greerton

How well placed is ABC Greerton to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

ABC Greerton is situated in the Greerton suburb of Tauranga. It is an all-day education and care centre licensed for 45 children including up to 10 under the age of two years, in two aged-based rooms. At the time of this review 55 children were enrolled, mostly of Māori and Pākehā descent, and including a small number of other nationalities.

Since the last ERO review in 2015 the centre has changed it's name from ABC Tauranga to ABC Greerton. The governing organisation has also changed its name, from Kidicorp to BestStart Educare Limited, and has become a not-for-profit organisation. A professional service manager and business manager provide support for the centre. The centre operates under the Central North Island Waikato regional management team within BestStart. A centre manager overseas the daily operation of the centre. There have been significant changes of teaching staff since the last review.

The philosophy for the centre places priority on the four guiding principles of Te Whāriki, Early childhood curriculum. These are empowerment, holistic development, relationships and community and family. They uphold the values and beliefs of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and respect the individual cultural identity of each child.

The centre has responded positively to the next step identified in the 2015 ERO report and is now developing links with local hapū and iwi and beginning to strengthen the use of te reo Māori.

This review was part of a cluster of four reviews in the BestStart Educare Limited Central North Island region.

The Review Findings

Children enjoy a wide range of rich curriculum experiences. Features of the curriculum include:

  • opportunities for active exploration, including the use of a natural bush area attached to the centre, learning about sustainability and taking care of animals

  • the natural integration of literacy, mathematics and science

  • te ao Māori being visible within the physical environment and developing bicultural practices that support Māori to actively achieve success as Māori.

Children's learning is captured in portfolios available digitally. Each child has an individual development plan, showing progression of learning. This new system for assessment and planning needs time to be fully embedded.

Respectful, responsive relationships with children encourage them to be involved in inquiry learning. Strengths of teaching and learning practices include:

  • intentionally planned activities and projects

  • supporting children to develop working theories and critical thinking

  • transitions into and within the centre and on to school that are well supported

  • inclusive practice of children with additional learning needs

  • individualised care routines for children up to the age of two years in a well-resourced environment.

Leadership is effectively building teachers' practice to promote positive outcomes for children. Aspects of leadership contributing to this include:

  • mentoring, coaching and supporting emerging leadership within the teaching team

  • a strong vision, focussed on quality and ongoing improvement through internal evaluation

  • well-established relationships within the local community and BestStart management.

Leaders now need to review the centre's philosophy in consultation with the new teaching team and whānau, and document a localised curriculum.

BestStart's vison is to make a positive difference in the lives of children. Governance and management have developed clear strategic goals with guidelines and expectations for centre practice and curriculum. Regional leadership and management support centre leaders and teachers to enact the vision and goals of the service. There are comprehensive, well-established systems and practices to monitor, evaluate and plan for improvement across the organisation.

Key Next Steps

The centre now needs to continue to strengthen:

  • the consistency of documented evidence relating to individual goals for children and the use of multiple teacher voice in assessment

  • culturally responsive teaching practice, including increasing the use of te reo Māori and exploring children’s whakapapa and pēpeha

  • the centre's strategic approach to implementing Te Whāriki, Early childhood curriculum.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of ABC Greerton completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of ABC Greerton will be in three years.

Adrienne Fowler

Director Review and Improvement Services

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

26 October 2018

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

30082

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 10 aged under 2

Service roll

55

Gender composition

Boys 31 Girls 24

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Indian
Other

23
21
4
7

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

August 2018

Date of this report

26 October 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

June 2015

Supplementary Review

July 2012

Education Review

August 2011

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of ABC Tauranga

How well placed is ABC Tauranga to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

ABC Tauranga is located in the Greerton suburb of Tauranga, Bay of Plenty. The service operates under the management umbrella of Kidicorp Ltd, a privately owned organisation with centres throughout New Zealand. It is an all-day education and care service licensed for 45 children, including a maximum of 15 up to two years of age. Children learn and play in two age-group areas, each with an outdoor playground developed to meet their learning needs. Currently there are 57 children on the roll, 19 of whom identify as Māori.

The previous ERO review in 2012 identified that the centre had made significant improvement to the quality of education and care. The teaching team has continued to make progress, and has established a shared philosophy, agreed strategic direction, and robust self-review processes. These developments are in accord with the recommendations from the 2012 ERO review and reflect the company’s standards, vision and values.

There have been changes to staffing since the last ERO review. The centre manager and two teaching staff have continued in the same roles, while there have been changes to the staff for infants and toddlers. One of these changes is the result of a promotion to another centre, and the other is for maternity leave. The centre classrooms have been renovated and the outdoor areas have been substantially upgraded.

A strong focus on self review has contributed to environmental changes to further support the curriculum, and to make progress in planning for bicultural practices. The centre is continuing to work as part of a cluster of centres to strengthen planning and assessment practices.

The Review Findings

Children are positive, confident learners who communicate well with each other and with teachers. They have a strong sense of identity and enjoy playing and learning in a positive, trusting environment. Teachers join actively in play and exploration to support and extend children’s experiences, and model expectations and possibilities. Infants and toddlers benefit from sensitive and responsive teachers who establish trusting relationships with children and their families. ERO reviewers observed calm, thoughtful teaching interactions that acknowledge children’s interests and respect their preferences and choices.

Teachers have recently focused on building reciprocal relationships with family, whānau and the wider community. They encourage parents to be active partners in their children’s learning, and use a variety of ways to welcome parents and include them in events and celebrations. Families appreciate that these occasions include and highlight the diverse cultures represented in the centre, particularly Māori and Indian.

The curriculum reflects children’s changing interests, and is supported by well resourced and attractively presented indoor and outdoor environments. The centre has focused on developing and refining aspects of the natural environment, which includes native plantings, and fosters children’s interactions with the living world. Children have authentic and meaningful learning opportunities. All children, including infants and toddlers, have increasing opportunities to experience trips and excursions into the local and wider community. Aspects of literacy and mathematics are embedded in the programme through the use of equipment such as games, puzzles, books, art and music.

A variety of bicultural practices is included in the curriculum, including karakia for kai, waiata, and the display of photographs and pepeha that support children’s identity. The bicultural curriculum would be further strengthened by maintaining an emphasis on building teachers’ capability in te reo and understanding of the cultural heritage that Māori tamariki bring with them.

Children’s transitions into the centre, from the infant’s area to the younger children’s one, and then to school, are managed effectively to maintain children’s confident participation. The centre has established positive relationships with the local school, and children are well-prepared for ongoing learning through the Be School Ready programme. A feature of this centre is the way that the manager and her staff advocate for the learning and health needs of children requiring additional assistance. Teachers use appropriate strategies to respond sensitively to support children’s social interactions, independence and self-management skills.

Planning, assessment and evaluation processes increasingly include children’s voices and show their learning and progress over time. Parents receive rich information about the programme and their children’s engagement through displays, well-presented portfolios and online information. Teachers value parents’ aspirations for their children and include them in their plans for each child’s learning and development.

The centre manager strongly promotes the centre’s overall vision, which is to provide children, parents and the community with a sense of belonging, inclusion and ownership. Supported by the head teacher, she has developed a collegial, high-trust model and climate among staff. These leaders work collaboratively to model, support and develop the quality of professional practice. Leadership is shared among staff, and well-planned professional development is building teachers’ capacity to fulfil a variety of roles. Well-developed performance appraisal encourages teacher reflection, provides them with feedback about their practice, and offers them opportunities to share their skills and celebrate one anothers’ successes.

Kidicorp, through the professional service and business managers, empowers the centre manager to operate the business successfully and further develop its strong social outreach to the community. The organisations’ clear self-review processes are used effectively for ongoing improvements to centre practice.

Key Next Steps

ERO and ERO and centre leaders agree on the following next steps for development.

Leaders and teachers should continue to further build up bicultural practices by:

  • developing connections with local iwi
  • exploring Māori history in the local area
  • continuing to strengthen teacher capability with tikanga and te reo Māori.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of ABC Tauranga completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of ABC Tauranga will be in three years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern

4 June 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

30082

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

45 children, including up to 15 aged under 2

Service roll

57

Gender composition

Girls 30

Boys 27

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Indian

Cook Island

Fijian

Samoan

19

27

5

3

2

1

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:4

Better than minimum requirements

 

Over 2

1:10

Meets minimum requirements

Review team on site

April 2015

Date of this report

4 June 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Supplementary Review

July 2012

 

Education Review

August 2011

 

Education Review

January 2009

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

  • Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children
  • Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children
  • Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children
  • Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.