Crackerjacks Preschool 2020 Ltd

Education institution number:
30037
Service type:
Education and Care Service
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
83
Telephone:
Address:

192 Domain Rd, Te Awamutu

View on map

1 Evaluation of Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd

How well placed is Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd is well placed to promote positive learning outcomes for children.

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd is a privately owned, all-day education and care centre, situated in Te Awamutu. Since the last ERO review in 2014 it has moved from two separate licenses to one. The current licence is for 80 children. The licence for children under the age of two years has increased to 28 places. At the time of this review 103 children were enrolled, including 25 who identify as Māori and 10 from other ethnicities.

The centre owner is supported by a centre manager, an assistant manager, a registration and appraisal manager and two team leaders. The teaching team comprises of early childhood, primary and secondary school trained teachers and some in-training or unqualified members.

Through their philosophy, the centre puts the child at the heart of everything. Flexible enrolments support the diversity of the community attending. Play, relationship building, risk taking and child-led learning are valued.

The centre has a positive reporting history with ERO.

The Review Findings

Children benefit from the recently reviewed curriculum which is now a more child-led and play-based programme. Spacious outdoor environments enable children to engage in sensory and nature exploration. The Pirongia Explorers fortnightly excursion provides further opportunity for older learners to experience risk taking, problem solving and adventure. Literacy, mathematics and science are naturally integrated into learning. Predictable routines enable children to know what is expected and take increasing responsibility for self managing. Some elements of a bicultural curriculum are evident, including karakia, waiata and use of te reo Māori. Children develop a sense of belonging and wellbeing at the centre.

Children's learning is captured in individual portfolios. These are sent home six monthly and are available upon request. Good opportunities are made for parents to share their aspirations for their children's learning, and contribute to goal setting and planning. The current assessment, planning and evaluation of children's learning needs refining to:

  • consistently show increasing complexity of learning over time

  • frequently capture the language, culture and identity of all learners.

Respectful and responsive relationships between children, parents and teachers are fostered. Parents are kept well informed about ongoing events and activities and are regularly consulted about centre policies, practices and operations. Teachers know children well and respond to their individual strengths. They recognise children’s interests and dispositions and plan the environment to further support learning opportunities. The centre offers flexible enrolments that are responsive to the needs of families. Children's transitions into and within the centre are well supported.

Children with additional learning needs are well supported with inclusive teaching practice, well-managed procedures, and individual learning plans for children when required. Teachers encourage the development of social competence through well-implemented positive guidance practices. Children up to the age of two years have their individual care needs well met. They play and learn in a calm, unhurried environment. Positive learning outcomes are promoted for all children.

Managers and leaders are strongly focused on building teacher capability. A dedicated leader is employed to support beginning teachers and guide the appraisal process, with ongoing support from the wider leadership team. Staff feel well supported and valued. A team culture is based on centre-wide values and strong internal communication. Clear expectations guide teaching practice. Leaders are effective advocates for children.

The experienced management team have developed efficient systems and processes to guide centre operations. A strategic plan, including an annual professional development plan and policy review schedule, has been developed and provides the basis for ongoing evaluation and development. Managers should continue to explore opportunities for parents and whānau to be involved in reviews of centre-wide processes and curriculum decisions. Ongoing, detailed internal evaluation is evident. An area for refinement is to regularly document internal evaluation and its impact on outcomes for children.

Key Next Steps

The key next steps for Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd managers and leaders are to:

  • refine the assessment, planning and evaluation for children's learning

  • continue strengthening the documentation of internal evaluation and the impact on outcomes for children.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)

  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)

  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)

  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Phil Cowie

Director Review and Improvement Services

Central Region

7 June 2019

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Te Awamutu

Ministry of Education profile number

30037

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

80 children, including up to 28 aged under 2

Service roll

103

Gender composition

Female 55% Male 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori
NZ European/Pākehā
Other

25%
64%
11%

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%+

Based on funding rates

80% +

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Over 2

1:8

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

February 2019

Date of this report

7 June 2019

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

February 2015

Education Review

October 2011

Education Review

May 2008

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement

The overall judgement that ERO makes will depend on how well the service promotes positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed

  • Well placed

  • Requires further development

  • Not well placed

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.

1 Evaluation of Crackerjacks Pre-School Ltd Juniors

How well placed is Crackerjacks Pre-School Ltd Juniors to promote positive learning outcomes for children?

Not well placed

Requires further development

Well placed

Very well placed

ERO's findings that support this overall judgement are summarised below.

Background

Crackerjacks Preschool Ltd Juniors' philosophy puts the child at the centre of learning. The service aims to assist all children to develop warm, loving, caring relationships. They have many opportunities to initiate play, extend their own interests, and be confident and independent learners. Consultation with Ngati Maniapoto Trust Board has resulted in a review of the service philosophy and a stronger focus on te reo and tikanga Maniapoto in teaching practice.

The service is privately owned and provides early childhood education and care for children from birth to school age. There are two separate licences on the same site with separate areas for babies, toddlers and young children. The centre is open from 7.30am to 5.45pm Monday to Friday.

The knowledgeable licensee-owner takes an active role in the centres' administration and has a strong commitment to the education and wellbeing of young children. She has high expectations for teaching and learning, and provides effective professional support and guidance for staff.

The centre manager is responsible for the day to day administration of both licences and is currently the acting team leader of the toddler area. She is an enthusiastic and capable leader with a strong focus on positive outcomes for children. There are two experienced team leaders in the babies' and young children's areas.

Respectful and collaborative relationships exist among children, parents and whānau, and staff. Parents appreciate that teachers provide their children with a learning environment that is enjoyable, friendly and inclusive. They value the ability to be flexible about children's hours of attendance when required.

The Review Findings

Babies settle quickly in a warm, welcoming and calm environment. They explore and make sense of the world around them as they experiment with movement, language, and a variety of resources. Babies enjoy many opportunities to interact and build strong attachments with teachers, particularly those who are their primary carers.

Teachers have a very good understanding of babies' developmental needs and deliberately plan to build and extend their emotional, physical and intellectual growth. They skilfully recognise babies' early attempts at talking and sounds, and use a variety of strategies to respond to their changing needs and preferences. Frequent conversations with parents and whānau provide teachers with vital information to support babies' engagement and learning.

Toddlers are highly engaged in an environment that provides a wide range of activities that stimulate and challenge them. They have easy access to both inside and outside resources. Toddlers are free to safely use equipment as and where they wish to support and extend their understandings about the world around them.

Teachers interact with toddlers to promote their confidence and independence as they explore the environment. Teachers notice what children are interested in and follow up with meaningful activities that contribute to their learning. They model new language for toddlers and give them time to respond and converse.

Children are recognised as independent learners who have the capability to understand their own needs. They lead their own learning, develop friendships, and have the confidence to decide when they are ready to move into the next area of the centre.

Teachers demonstrate cultural sensitivity and recognise all parents and whānau as contributing members of the centre community. Māori children and whānau appreciate their language and culture being valued and shared through daily karakia, waiata and respect for tikanga Māori.

Centre leaders have worked with teachers to further develop their knowledge of the extent of mathematics learning. They have had professional development in science, technology, engineering and mathematics and how these areas are integrated into children's learning. Children experience mathematics as an enjoyable part of learning, related to their world.

A clear framework for monitoring children's progress and learning assists teachers to evaluate children's development. Regular and frequent recorded observations about children's learning support teachers to effectively plan purposeful activities. Six-monthly summary progress reports are shared with parents in personal portfolios.

Leaders and teachers have implemented highly effective self-review procedures and practices. They have a shared understanding about the purpose of self review. Reviews are well planned and used to inform decision making and improve the quality of care and education for young children. A robust appraisal process invites teachers to reflect on their practice and set performance goals focused on promoting positive outcomes for young children.

Key Next Steps

A feature of the centre is an ongoing commitment to a sustainable curriculum. Centre leaders have identified that it is essential to continue to develop teachers' professional leadership capabilities and bicultural practices.

Management Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the staff and management of Crackerjacks Pre-School Ltd Juniors completed an ERO Centre Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • curriculum
  • premises and facilities
  • health and safety practices
  • governance, management and administration.

During the review, ERO looked at the service’s systems for managing the following areas that have a potentially high impact on children's wellbeing:

  • emotional safety (including positive guidance and child protection)
  • physical safety (including supervision; sleep procedures; accidents; medication; hygiene; excursion policies and procedures)
  • suitable staffing (including qualification levels; police vetting; teacher registration; ratios)
  • evacuation procedures and practices for fire and earthquake.

All early childhood services are required to promote children's health and safety and to regularly review their compliance with legal requirements.

Next ERO Review

When is ERO likely to review the service again?

The next ERO review of Crackerjacks Pre-School Ltd Juniors will be in four years.

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer-Northern

5 February 2015

The Purpose of ERO Reports

The Education Review Office (ERO) is the government department that, as part of its work, reviews early childhood services throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. ERO’s reports provide information for parents and communities about each service’s strengths and next steps for development. ERO’s bicultural evaluation framework Ngā Pou Here is described in SECTION 3 of this report. Early childhood services are partners in the review process and are expected to make use of the review findings to enhance children's wellbeing and learning.

2 Information about the Early Childhood Service

Location

Te Awamutu

Ministry of Education profile number

30037

Licence type

Education & Care Service

Licensed under

Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008

Number licensed for

40 children, including up to 25 aged under 2

Service roll

69

Gender composition

Boys 37

Girls 32

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Other

15

49

5

Percentage of qualified teachers

0-49% 50-79% 80%

Based on funding rates

80%

Reported ratios of staff to children

Under 2

1:3

Better than minimum requirements

Review team on site

December 2014

Date of this report

5 February 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

October 2011

 

Education Review

May 2008

 

Education Review

June 2005

3 General Information about Early Childhood Reviews

ERO’s Evaluation Framework

ERO’s overarching question for an early childhood education review is ‘How well placed is this service to promote positive learning outcomes for children?’ ERO focuses on the following factors as described in the bicultural framework Ngā Pou Here:

Pou Whakahaere – how the service determines its vision, philosophy and direction to ensure positive outcomes for children

Pou Ārahi – how leadership is enacted to enhance positive outcomes for children

Mātauranga – whose knowledge is valued and how the curriculum is designed to achieve positive outcomes for children

Tikanga whakaako – how approaches to teaching and learning respond to diversity and support positive outcomes for children.

Within these areas ERO considers the effectiveness of arotake – self review and of whanaungatanga – partnerships with parents and whānau.

ERO evaluates how well placed a service is to sustain good practice and make ongoing improvements for the benefit of all children at the service.

A focus for the government is that all children, especially priority learners, have an opportunity to benefit from quality early childhood education. ERO will report on how well each service promotes positive outcomes for all children, with a focus on children who are Māori, Pacific, have diverse needs, and are up to the age of two.

For more information about the framework and Ngā Pou Here refer to ERO’s Approach to Review in Early Childhood Services.

ERO’s Overall Judgement and Next Review

The overall judgement that ERO makes and the timing of the next review will depend on how well placed a service is to promote positive learning outcomes for children. The categories are:

  • Very well placed – The next ERO review in four years
  • Well placed – The next ERO review in three years
  • Requires further development – The next ERO review within two years
  • Not well placed - The next ERO review in consultation with the Ministry of Education

ERO has developed criteria for each category. These are available on ERO’s website.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews are tailored to each service’s context and performance, within the overarching review framework. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to positive outcomes for children and useful to the service.