Glenfield College

Education institution number:
30
School type:
Secondary (Year 9-15)
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
569
Telephone:
Address:

60 Kaipatiki Road, Glenfield, Auckland

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Glenfield College

Te Ara Huarau | School Profile Report

Background

This Profile Report was written within 15 months of the Education Review Office and Glenfield College working in Te Ara Huarau, an improvement evaluation approach used in most English Medium State and State Integrated Schools. For more information about Te Ara Huarau see ERO’s website www.ero.govt.nz

Context 

Glenfield College on Auckland’s North Shore is a multicultural secondary school catering for students from Years 9 to 13. The school values are ‘With Pride and Respect – Mā Maruwehi, Kā Rāhiri’.

The college values the inclusion of students with high learning needs from Wilson School and Wairau Valley Special School. These classes are adjacent to and network with the college’s learning support department.

Glenfield College’s strategic priorities for improving outcomes for learners are:

  • Hauora – excellence in wellbeing across the school community

  • Providing quality teaching and learning programmes that build dynamic learners

  • Student success – building capacity in teachers/kaiako that leads to a culture of success

  • Meeting Māori and Pasifika academic aspirations.

You can find a copy of the school’s strategic and annual plan on Glenfield College’s website.

ERO and the school are working together to evaluate how well the development of a schoolwide literacy programme linked to our strategic goals of Hauora and Dynamic Learner promotes achievement and success for all students.

The rationale for selecting this evaluation is:

  • school leaders have identified the importance of lifting junior school literacy and achievement with a schoolwide programme

  • a literacy programme, linked with Hauora and Dynamic Learner, will enable students to access and achieve success in the senior curriculum and future pathways

  • to ensure equity and excellence is available to all.

The school expects to see:

  • a schoolwide literacy programme established and embedded

  • student literacy and achievement will improve across the school

  • an inclusive education will be provided through these strategic initiatives.

Strengths

The school can draw from the following strengths to achieve its goal:

  • schoolwide programmes to raise literacy achievement are being implemented

  • effective school leadership which has created and led a culture of ongoing improvement

  • well established processes to build capacity in teaching staff, based on strong pedagogy and assessment practices

  • a values-based education that supports the wellbeing of learners and build a strong sense of belonging.

Where to next?

Moving forward, the school will prioritise:

  • implementing and embedding a schoolwide Literacy programme linked with Hauora and the Development of Dynamic Learners

  • developing a Māori Achievement programme with whanau that promotes Māori success

  • providing resources and support for teachers to build capacity in Te Reo Māori, Tikanga and Matauranga Māori that benefits the whole community.

ERO’s role will be to support the school in its evaluation for improvement cycle to improve outcomes for all learners. ERO will support the school in reporting their progress to the community. The next public report on ERO’s website will be a Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report and is due within three years.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

27 October 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.  educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Glenfield College

Board Assurance with Regulatory and Legislative Requirements Report 2022 to 2024

As of May 2022, the Glenfield College Board has attested to the following regulatory and legislative requirements:

Board Administration

Yes

Curriculum

Yes

Management of Health, Safety and Welfare

Yes

Personnel Management

Yes

Finance

Yes

Assets

Yes

Further Information

For further information please contact Glenfield College, School Board.

The next School Board assurance that it is meeting regulatory and legislative requirements will be reported, along with the Te Ara Huarau | School Evaluation Report, within three years.

Information on ERO’s role and process in this review can be found on the Education Review Office website.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

27 October 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Glenfield College

Provision for International Students Report

Background

The Education Review Office reviews schools that are signatories to the Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021 established under section 534 of the Education and Training Act 2020.

Findings

Glenfield College has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code and has completed an annual self-review of its implementation of the Code.

At the time of this review there were six international students attending the school.

Effective systems and practices to ensure the quality of education and pastoral care of international students are established. Information about students’ academic progress, welfare and participation is monitored and regularly reported to the School Board.

International students are well-supported to participate and contribute to all aspects of school life.

Shelley Booysen
Director of Schools

27 October 2023 

About the School

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement. educationcounts.govt.nz/home

Glenfield College - 31/08/2017

Findings

The significant shift in Glenfield College NCEA achievement in 2016 is an indication of the effectiveness of leaders’ and teachers’ personalised and relational initiatives. Considerable efforts are made so students can access a curriculum that is responsive to their individualised learning needs and pathways.  

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Glenfield College on Auckland’s North Shore is a multicultural secondary school catering for students from Years 9 to 13. The school values are ‘With Pride and Respect – Mā maru wehi, Kā rāhiri’. The college values the inclusion of students with high learning needs from Wilson School and Wairau Valley Special School. These classes are adjacent to and network with the college’s learning support department.

Staffing changes have enabled the appointment of leaders and teachers who bring fresh perspectives and innovation to the professional learning culture of the school. A new principal began his tenure Term 2 in 2016, and has had a significant influence on practices to effect positive outcomes for learners.

The college is a member of the Kaipatiki Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako (CoL), which includes local kindergartens and primary and intermediate schools from Glenfield.

ERO’s 2014 report noted that students benefitted from the college’s positive learning environment based on restorative practices, inclusion, respect and an appreciation of diversity. This review finds that trustees, leaders and staff have sustained this accepting and supportive culture, and they continue to seek further ways to enhance students’ learning opportunities.

ERO’s 2014 report also identified development priorities that have been more particularly addressed during the past year. These priorities included making more effective use of achievement data to accelerate priority learners' progress, developing more coherent learning pathways for students, reviewing leadership effectiveness, and strengthening teachers’ reflection on the effectiveness of teaching practices. 

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

School leaders and staff have increased the effectiveness of their use of achievement information to make positive changes in learners’ progress and achievement. Achievement information is now more deliberately analysed and used by:

  • heads of departments, in newly formatted curriculum reports to the board
  • teachers, in their inquiries into the effectiveness of their teaching practice
  • leaders and staff, to openly and collaboratively forecast and monitor NCEA credit progress.

In 2016, the college’s results in National Certificates of Achievement (NCEA) showed significant, positive shifts. In particular there was an overall 16 percent rise in achievement at Level 2. The biggest shift was seen in Māori achievement at the University Entrance Level with an increase of 22 percent. Māori achievement also rose 11 percent on average, in Levels 1, 2 and 3. Overall achievement at the college is now tracking close to national achievement levels using roll-based data, and Māori achievement is now higher than national Māori achievement. There was also an increase in the number of merit and excellence endorsements in 2016, particularly in Level 1.

These positive shifts can be attributed to the more personalised approaches introduced in 2016 to promote priority learners’ success and self efficacy. These initiatives include:

  • well considered, aspirational targets, backed by deliberate teaching and system actions to achieve these targets
  • collective staff knowledge of, and responsibility for, priority learners’ NCEA progress
  • offering additional opportunities for students to work individually with teachers
  • raising expectations, and restructuring systems for academic mentoring to closely support students in their individual learning pathways
  • developing active partnerships with parents/whānau to support their children’s learning.

These 2016 initiatives are helping leaders and teachers to work towards reducing the disparity in NCEA achievement between Māori and Pacific students and other groups.

In 2017, leaders and teachers are focusing more on raising literacy and numeracy achievement in Years 9 and 10 so that students are ready to be successful in NCEA at Year 11. Together with staff, leaders are developing relevant assessment practices and frameworks for tracking progress in Years 9 and 10. These frameworks are well aligned with the levels of the New Zealand Curriculum.

The college is working with CoL contributing schools to share achievement information, and to determine common approaches to assessment. Senior leaders are considering ways to transfer the successful 2016 initiatives to benefit learners in Years 9 and 10.

Leaders and teachers have also improved the ways they use achievement information to engage parents in conversations about learning. Parents have easier access to relevant data, particularly through online sharing of real-time achievement information. They also have increased opportunities to discuss their children’s progress in depth. This is helping parents to participate in decision making at important transition points on their children’s educational journey. 

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The Glenfield College curriculum is supporting students well to engage and succeed in their learning. It is future focused, and is accepting and supportive of students’ diverse learning needs and aspirations.

Teachers and leaders follow holistic approaches to enable students to know themselves as learners. They make considerable efforts so students can access a curriculum that is responsive to their individualised learning needs and pathways, and supports their success in meaningful qualifications.

Students are proud of their school. They are supported well to develop confidence and a sense of belief in themselves as learners. They have multiple forums to voice their perspectives regarding the curriculum and school life, and they are confident that their voice is heard and responded to by teachers and leaders.

The college provides extensive and responsive provision for students’ pastoral care. Restorative and pastoral practices are interwoven in the curriculum to support students’ wellbeing, welfare, and readiness for learning. Mentoring across the school is advancing students’ personal growth and educational success. During the first two terms of 2017 there has been a significant increase in student attendance, punctuality to school and student engagement.

The curriculum reflects the intentions and key competencies of The New Zealand curriculum (NZC). The school manages the constraints of its small size well to provide a broad and meaningful curriculum for students. Vocational Pathways, the use of digital technologies, and distance learning help the school to provide a broad programme. A range of Education outside the Classroom (EOTC), sports and cultural activities enrich the curriculum offered. The college’s science department has supported student representatives to win the national robotics competition for the past two years.

The school’s vocational pathways programme enables students to gain relevant qualifications, and make them informed about future employment opportunities. Subject departments are adapting learning opportunities, and using external expertise, to accommodate learners’ vocational pathways and support the school’s academic focus. Many students follow combined vocational and academic programmes of learning, including those linked to the Service Academy.

Senior leaders have identified relevant priorities that include continuing to develop:

  • students’ self efficacy and ownership of their learning pathways
  • a strong foundation of learning through the Year 9 to 10 curriculum
  • teaching practices and programmes that support students’ e-learning skills and knowledge.

Further curriculum development priorities include considering ways to include a health programme for Years 11 to 13.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The college values and affirms Māori students’ identity, language and culture. Bicultural practices are becoming increasingly integrated in the curriculum and reflected in school life.

The significant shift in Māori NCEA achievement in 2016 is an indication of the effectiveness of leaders’ and teachers’ personalised and relational initiatives. Students are well supported to grow in confidence as Māori in the school. The school’s 2017 data indicate that Māori students are more engaged in school, and are continuing their learning longer through to Year 13.

This year, teachers’ appraisals include a more specific focus on building culturally responsive teaching practice to engage Māori students in learning. The aim is for Māori students to have a greater sense of succeeding as Māori in the school, and to achieve greater achievement parity with their peers. There is a similar focus on supporting Pacific student engagement and achievement parity.

Senior leaders and trustees recognise the value of developing a strategic plan for Māori success, in collaboration with whānau Māori. Māori leadership of such a plan could be useful to coordinate the work of the multiple efforts made to promote Māori student success, as Māori, in the college.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Glenfield College is well placed to sustain the momentum of 2016’s initiatives and achievement success, and to continue adapting and refining practices for student equity and excellence. Trustees, leaders and teachers demonstrate a commitment to ongoing improvement. Evaluation for improvement is motivated by the need to make changes that have a positive impact on student learning and wellbeing.

College leaders promote a sense of optimism, and confidence in the school vision, which inspires young people to be future focused, and well prepared to follow their pathways. Learners are at the centre of decision making, planning and practice at all levels of the college. The college has a clear sense of direction and strategic leadership. The board’s vision is purposefully aligned to management planning, school improvement goals, and targets for raising achievement.

The board of trustees provides sound stewardship of the school. Trustees work collaboratively with the principal and school leaders to develop strategic and annual planning. This planning, and the achievement of annual goals are informed by ongoing evaluation that includes student, whānau and staff perspectives.

Highly effective leadership has driven positive changes over the past 18 months, resulting in greater student engagement in learning and achievement success. Coherent strategies and school systems are guiding school-wide consistency and improvement. These include raised expectations, curriculum planning and evaluation, as well as improvement-focused teacher appraisal.

Professional learning and the new appraisal process are relevant, and aligned to school priorities. In recent years there has been a deliberate focus on building teacher capability in analysis and use of achievement data. Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) has been successfully embedded and evaluated to fit the school’s context.

ERO recommends that trustees, leaders and teachers continue to embed the 2016 initiatives, and to adapt the curriculum and teaching practice through evaluative inquiry and evidence-based decision making. 

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. At the time of this review there were 46 international students attending the school. Students contribute well to the college’s inclusive and cultural environment.

The college provides inclusive and relevant programmes for international students. An experienced coordinator provides evaluative reports for parents and the board on student learning, achievement and their participation in school life and the community.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The significant shift in Glenfield College NCEA achievement in 2016 is an indication of the effectiveness of leaders’ and teachers’ personalised and relational initiatives. Considerable efforts are made so students can access a curriculum that is responsive to their individualised learning needs and pathways.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Violet Tu’uga Stevenson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern (Acting)

31 August 2017

About the School 

Location

Glenfield, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

30

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 15)

School roll

417

Number of international students

46

Gender composition

Boys 58%, Girls 42%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā
Māori
South East Asian
African
Chinese
Middle Eastern
Samoan
European
Tongan
other Pacific
other

31%
21%
17%
5%
3%
3%
3%
4%
2%
2%
9%

Special Features

2 classes from Wairau Valley Special School

2 classes from Wilson School

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

31 August 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Supplementary Review

June 2014
August 2010
May 2007

 

Glenfield College - 30/06/2014

Findings

Students benefit from an inclusive environment that supports their learning and achievement and promotes their wellbeing. The school engages with its community to celebrate student success. School leaders continue to seek new initiatives and opportunities to improve outcomes for students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Glenfield College is a medium size co-educational secondary school on Auckland’s North Shore. ERO’s 2010 review of Glenfield College noted significant improvements in the school culture, and a clear focus on raising student achievement. These good practices have been sustained under the effective leadership of the principal and board of trustees.

In 2013 Te Kura Tuarua o Kaipatiki opened their whare ako on the school site. Visitors to the school are welcomed in this whare through student-led protocol. Links with the community and the local contributing schools continue to be strengthened. Students are staying longer at school to achieve relevant qualifications. The school prioritises the needs of each individual student and is focused on being the school of choice for families in the Glenfield community.

School leaders provide a positive learning environment for students based on well embedded restorative practices and Kaipatiki values which promote inclusion, respect and an appreciation of diversity. The board recently established two satellite classes for students with high learning needs. The school continues to attract international students who are engaged in the wider life of the school.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school uses achievement information well to promote student learning.

The board continues to use achievement information data well to set strategic and annual goals and to improve community perceptions. The school supports improved outcomes for all students with a strategic focus on promoting positive outcomes for students who are at risk of not achieving to their potential. Teachers use data to help transition students into the school at Year 9. The school is well placed to report on student progress and achievement at Year 9 and 10. More detailed reporting of the progress and achievement of Year 9 and 10 students would improve the information the board has about these students’ learning. Heads of department collect and analyse data at Years 11, 12 and 13 to inform the board of student achievement against charter goals.

Students generally make good progress during their time at the school. Strategic goals have been set to lift the achievement levels of students who are below expectations, particularly those who are Māori or Pacific. It is worth noting that a high level of transience contributes to some of the challenges the school faces in raising student achievement levels.  

The school has engaged a facilitator to help develop a Pacific Education Plan that will engage Pacific parents in the learning and achievement of their students through the use of student identified mentors. Teachers work with the facilitator to develop effective teaching strategies that focus on success for Pacific students.

Support for students with special educational learning needs is very effective. Teachers are making better use of academic, pastoral and administration systems to monitor the progress of all learners. Planning for teachers to use this data specifically to accelerate and monitor the progress of priority learners is a positive next step.

Having all teachers track student achievement data over time to reflect on the effectiveness of their teaching practice could benefit both teachers and students. School leaders could further develop this inquiry approach through the continued use of Ministry of Education documents, Ka Hikitia Accelerating Success 2013-2017 and Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum promotes and supports student learning well. The curriculum is responsive to student interests and provides opportunities for academic, sporting and cultural success. Teachers help students to develop competencies for independent learning. Form tutors and deans provide individual support for students.

The school’s use of restorative practice has strengthened student’s understanding of social responsibility. Together with the emphasis on environmental sustainability, this contributes to a relevant and forward thinking curriculum.

At Years 10, 11 and 12, students are supported to make appropriate subject choices, set academic targets and keep their future options open. Parents are involved in discussions and decisions with the school about their children’s progress and achievement.

The curriculum has a school-wide literacy focus. Students are engaged in their learning in inclusive and encouraging classroom environments. Positive interactions between teachers and students support the innovative practices that challenge students’ thinking and learning. Students are encouraged to maintain an interest in the creative and performing arts and health and physical education.

There is teaching expertise across a wide range of subject areas. Specific approaches are used to engage students in challenging learning experiences such as robotics, boat-building, automotive, dance and languages. Student retention has increased as a result of such motivating programmes.

The school should continue to review the curriculum so that it meets the future learning interests of students. It would be useful for curriculum leaders to explore the development of more coherent learning pathways. These pathways can be used to connect learning areas through skills such as critical thinking and self management. Careers education should also be broadened to support new curriculum initiatives and innovative teaching.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Since the last ERO review, the board and school leaders have been very strategic in their approach to supporting Māori students and their whānau. The school’s engagement with the Māori community to complete the whare ako and the choice by whānau to enrol their children at Glenfield College is a clear indication of the school’s commitment to te reo Māori me ōna tikanga and to educational success for Māori as Māori.

A large whānau tutor group is the basis for the Māori student mentoring programme. Teachers work with selected students who are also supported through tuakana/teina relationships. Students set goals and meet with mentors to ensure progress and achievement is monitored regularly.

Māori students now access credits at higher levels through Māori performing arts. An enhanced focus on bicultural practices supports all students to identify as successful, capable and competent learners. The increased recognition of Māori students succeeding in the broader curriculum helps them to choose learning pathways appropriate to their cultural identity and individual strengths.

The ongoing provision of strong leadership in the teaching of te reo me ōna tikanga is critical to the development of overall Māori student achievement.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The board sets goals for school improvement based on strategic priorities and student achievement information and is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The board, principal and staff have a shared vision for learning and strategic priorities based on analysed achievement information. A current priority is improving outcomes for underachieving students. School leaders seek new initiatives that support these goals and report on progress as part of the board’s ongoing self review. 

The school provides well for students in its community. An additional priority for the board is to use this as a basis for further building the community's positive perception of the school.  This could help the school to rebuild its roll numbers.

The principal is well respected by staff, students and the community. He continues to provide leadership that is collaborative and transformative. A clear focus on equitable outcomes for students underpins the school’s culture and Kaipatiki values. Restorative approaches result in respectful interactions between staff and students.

Teachers are valued by the board and students. The establishment of professional learning groups is an opportunity for teachers to discuss effective practice and strengthen evidence-based teaching across the school.

Trustees bring experience and commitment to school governance. They take an active interest in student achievement outcomes and the work of the school managers. Good information supports the board’s decision making. Trustees agree that a documented annual work plan and a governance manual would support new board members and improve governance sustainability.

Some curriculum leaders contribute significantly to sharing expertise and sustaining new initiatives within their departments. In order to help others meet these expectations, senior leaders should extend the support they currently provide.

Key next steps for senior leaders are to:

  • review how effectively the current roles within the management team contribute to leading and sustaining school developments and initiatives
  • modify and embed new performance management requirements to include the Registered Teacher Criteria and to provide better alignment with school-wide and professional goals.

Provision for international students

Glenfield College is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under the section 238F of the Education Act 1989.

At the time of the review there were 58 international students from diverse range countries, including Europe and Asia.

The school responds well to the interests of international students. Pastoral care services and English language teaching programmes are designed to meet their specific needs and improve their English language skills. International students are encouraged to participate in co-curricular activities and involve themselves in the wider life of the school.

The international student department is managed by an experienced director, and administration staff. The director meets regularly with the principal. The board has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code. ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self-review process for international students is thorough.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should modify the school's performance management system to include the New Zealand Teacher Council's Registered Teacher Criteria.

ERO also identified an area of non-compliance relating to student safety. While the school has good risk analysis processes ERO found that in one case they were not sufficiently comprehensive. To meet requirements the Board of Trustees must ensure:

  • that a comprehensive risk analysis is completed prior to students leaving the school for Education Outside The Classrooms (EOTC)

[National Administration Guideline 5].

Conclusion

Students benefit from an inclusive environment that supports their learning and achievement and promotes their wellbeing. The school engages with its community to celebrate student success. School leaders continue to seek new initiatives and opportunities to improve outcomes for students.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Dale Bailey
National Manager Review Services
Northern Region

30 June 2014

About the School 

Location

Glenfield, Auckland

Ministry of Education profile number

30

School type

State Co-Educational Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

625

Number of international students

58

Gender composition

Boys      57%
Girls       43%

Ethnic composition

Maori
NZ European/Pakeha
South East Asian
Indian
African
Samoan
Tongan
other European
other Asian
other

21%
33%
18%
  5%
  5%
  4%
  2%
  4%
  3%
  5%

Special Features

Service Academy

Adult Community Education

Two Satellite Classes:

  • Wilson School
  • Wairau Valley Special School

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

30 June 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Supplementary Review
Education Review

August 2010
May 2007
November 2005