Redwood School (Tawa)

Education institution number:
2976
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
359
Telephone:
Address:

Redwood Avenue, Tawa, Wellington

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Redwood School (Tawa) - 18/04/2017

Summary

Redwood School caters for students in Years 1 to 6. Students attending the school come from a range of ethnic backgrounds, with 11% identifying as Māori, 5% as Pacific and 17% as Asian.

Since the 2014 ERO review, new trustees have been elected and there have been some staff changes. Additional opportunities for leadership have been created with the appointment of three new syndicate leaders. Professional learning and development (PLD) for teachers in ‘Inquiry Learning’ and in ‘Learning through Play’ reflects the school’s future focus. In 2015 the school participated in the Accelerating Learning in Mathematics (ALiM) programme and 2017 is the third year where a kaiako is supporting the teaching and speaking of te reo Māori throughout the school.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Most students are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Māori students are achieving as well as their peers. In 2016, the majority of students achieving below the National Standards in reading and writing were boys. A similar achievement trend has been evident over the last four years. Robust moderation practices ensure greater dependability of National Standards’ information.

A useful schoolwide process is in place to help teachers identify and plan for students who are at risk of underachievement. Teachers are collaborative and prioritise learning through meaningful experiences.

Aligning the school’s vision and plans with an unrelenting focus on accelerating the progress of children not achieving the National Standards, and making better use of internal evaluation should assist the school to further promote equity and excellence.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school continues to develop its effectiveness in responding to all children, including Māori, whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Since the 2014 ERO review, schoolwide achievement information has shown that most students achieve at or above National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Data shows that there is no disparity between Māori students’ achievement and that of their peers. Pacific students’ reading achievement has improved over time. The achievement of some Pacific students in writing will be targeted for acceleration in 2017.

In 2016 nearly all of the students achieving below National Standards in reading and writing were boys. Twenty five percent of boys were below in writing.

There is evidence to show that the progress of some students was accelerated during 2016. School data has yet to be analysed to show the rate of accelerated progress over time for those Māori, Pacific, English Language Learners and others who were achieving below the National Standards.

Assessment and moderation practices are well considered and provide the board, school leadership and teachers with a dependable picture of achievement across the school. Students are regularly assessed using appropriate informal and standardised tools. Data from assessments is used to track achievement, inform teaching and report to families and to the board.

The school’s valued outcomes are to encourage students to be respectful, responsible, engaged, empowered and driven life-long learners.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has developed some effective processes to support the achievement of equity and excellence.

In‘Learning through Play’ in Years 1 and 2 and ‘Inquiry Learning’ in Years 3 to 6 the school is prioritising learning through meaningful experiences. Students are beginning to make decisions about and take more responsibility for their learning. Classrooms are welcoming, settled environments and interactions are respectful.

A useful schoolwide process is in place to help teachers identify and plan for students who are at risk of underachievement. Teachers are collaborative and support each other in their syndicate teams. They identify learning needs from achievement information and explore teaching practices that will promote improvement. Teachers know their students well and develop learning centred partnerships with parents.

School leaders promote good practice and actively support teachers through role modelling and mentoring. There has been some focus on specific teaching to accelerate progress in reading and mathematics.

Teachers regularly reflect on their practice. The school’s appraisal process supports teachers’ professional growth. Prioritising of PLD in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori is being progressed schoolwide.

The board regularly receives and discusses schoolwide achievement information with the principal and leadership team. Trustees make resourcing decisions to support and target student learning and achievement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Some school processes need further development to achieve and sustain equity and excellence.

The school’s vision, strategic and annual targets should be more clearly focused on raising and accelerating the achievement of students not yet reaching National Standards. Aligning the vision and targets, so that teacher inquiry is evidence based and deliberately focused on the acceleration of student achievement will strengthen this process.

Strategic and annual achievement targets should be more specific and include success indicators to assist the evaluation of the effectiveness of schoolwide development.

Senior leaders have identified the need to build collective capability in evaluation and inquiry for sustained improvement. Scrutinising the achievement data schoolwide and in syndicate teams should enable leaders and teachers to more easily see and address patterns and trends of underachievement.

The new curriculum has yet to be fully developed to include te ao Māori, local legends and stories, culture and identity, in consultation with whānau Māori.

School leaders are aware of the importance of strengthening learning-centred partnerships with families, including those whose children’s learning requires acceleration.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management. 

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • align the school’s vision, strategic and annual targets to the acceleration of students below National Standards

  • build consistency and collective capacity in evaluation and inquiry

  • further develop the curriculum to include te ao Māori in consultation with whānau Māori

  • continue to strengthen learning partnerships with families.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

18 April 2017

About the school 

Location

Tawa

Ministry of Education profile number

2976

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

372

Gender composition

Boys 51%, Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori 11% Pacific 5% Asian 17% Pākehā 60%

Other ethnic groups 7%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2017

Date of this report

18 April 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, May 2014

Education Review, April 2011

Education Review, February 2008

 

Redwood School (Tawa) - 30/05/2014

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Redwood School caters for students in Years 1 to 6, largely from the surrounding neighbourhood. Students attending the school come from a range of ethnic backgrounds, with 7% identifying as Māori and 5% as Pacific. The school enjoys strong support from its community. The school's vision and values are for students to be ‘respectful, responsible, engaged, empowered and driven to be life-long learners’.

The school has a positive reporting history with ERO. Since the April 2011 ERO report, the board appointed a new principal and deputy principal and the school has participated in Ministry of Education (the Ministry) contracts to help teachers:

  • accelerate the progress of students who are below National Standards in literacy and mathematics
  • use digital technologies to support teaching and learning.

Contracts to support literacy development and the use of digital technologies continue this year.

There have also been changes in board membership, with new trustees undertaking some training to help them understand their governance role and responsibilities.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Schoolwide achievement information gathered over the past three years shows that the majority of students achieve at or above in relation to National Standards for reading, writing and mathematics. The achievement of Māori and Pacific students is similar to their peers and Asian students achieve well. The board uses this information to set annual targets to accelerate the progress of priority students who are below the standards.

Since the previous ERO review, teachers are using achievement information more effectively to:

  • make reliable judgements in relation to National Standards as a result of improved moderation processes, especially for writing
  • look more closely at the data to better inform teaching and learning in some classes.

Senior leaders identify that the next step is to:

  • support all teachers make better use of assessment data to inform teaching and learning by sharing effective models within the school.

The school gathers useful achievement information when students enter school aged five and the need for early intervention is apparent. The assistant principal is supporting junior teachers to make better use of achievement information to identify teaching strategies that accelerate students’ progress.

A good range of additional programmes support students with special needs and abilities. Most focus on small group teaching outside the classroom using part-time teachers. Student progress is monitored with clear evidence to show that some students make accelerated progress. Further consideration should be given to:

  • promoting more targeted support within classroom teaching programmes for students who are achieving below National Standards.

Students with very high learning needs are well supported. Their progress and achievement is monitored through individual education plans.

Parents and whānau receive useful information about their child’s progress and achievement in relation to National Standards. School leaders have sought and responded positively to feedback from parents about the school’s reporting and continue to review and improve the process.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Students participate in a wide range of learning experiences. Appropriate priority is given to literacy, numeracy and physical education, including daily fitness. Other curriculum areas such as science, social sciences, health, technology and the arts are integrated through student inquiries, based around a range of topics. Students enjoy participating in activities outside the classroom and the engagement they have with other students from local schools at special events.

Examples of effective teaching practices are evident. Interactions between teachers and students are positive and supportive. Most classes have a settled, learning-focused atmosphere and many of the older students talk confidently about their learning. Leaders plan to support greater consistency of effective practices across the school.

Senior leaders and teachers are presently reviewing the school’s curriculum to ensure it is designed to cater for the needs of all students. They have also begun to review behaviour management practices. ERO suggests widening the scope to include student wellbeing as the findings are likely to link well with the outcomes of the curriculum review.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school’s curriculum gives specific focus to aspects of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. The kapa haka group is gathering strength and has performed well in the local Tawa Cultural Festival. While the majority of Māori students are achieving well, the school’s curriculum is not yet sufficiently responsive to their needs, interests, abilities and culture. The curriculum review should help address this.

The board, school leaders and whānau have yet to develop shared understandings about success for Māori, as Māori. Increased knowledge of whānau values and aspirations is likely to contribute to the development of effective strategies to further promote the learning and wellbeing of Māori students as Māori. Using the recent Ministry publications Ka Hikitia Accelerating Success 2013-2017 and Tātaiako Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners should support this development.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Trustees, senior leaders and teachers are committed to ongoing improvement. The board has developed a clear vision, values and goals to guide future planning and the strong partnership with families supports student learning and wellbeing. Effective aspects of self review include:

  • good analysis of schoolwide achievement information with a clear focus on accelerating the progress of students not meeting National Standards
  • school leaders and teachers regularly reflecting on teaching and learning
  • the board’s cycle of ongoing policy review.

The next steps are to:

  • develop a robust process for the in-depth review of the school’s curriculum to ensure it responds effectively to the diverse range of student needs, abilities and cultures
  • establish a cohesive and well aligned approach to school development and review, including strengthening links to appraisal
  • consider the most effective leadership model to promote and support ongoing school improvement.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

When is ERO likely to review the school again?

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

30 May 2014

Image removed.About the School

Location

Tawa, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2976

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

409

Gender composition

Male 54%, Female 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Asian

Pacific

Indian

Other European

Other Ethnic Groups

7%

69%

7%

5%

5%

5%

2%

Review team on site

March 2014

Date of this report

30 May 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

February 2008

November 2004