Paremata School

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Education institution number:
2950
School type:
Full Primary
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
375
Telephone:
Address:

Paremata Crescent, Paremata, Porirua

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School Context

Paremata School, in Porirua North, is a full primary catering for students in Years 1 to 8. At the time of ERO’s evaluation, the roll was 387. Pākehā children make up approximately 70% of the roll. Māori children at 17%, are the next largest group. Of the remaining children, 6% are Pacific.

The school’s expressed vision for student success includes the valued outcomes of respect, identity and empathy for other - children will be active learners who have resilience, global awareness and a strong sense of community.

The school’s current achievement targets and goals focus on improving progress and outcomes for all children so that they meet school expectations.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, schoolwide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • progress and academic achievement in reading, writing and mathematics

  • progress and achievement for those with additional learning needs

  • valued outcomes in relation to the school key competencies.

Some changes in teaching staff have occurred since the October 2014 ERO report.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is effectively promoting equitable and excellent achievement outcomes for most students.

High levels of achievement in reading, writing and mathematics have been sustained. Reported achievement information at the end of 2016 shows most students, including Māori and Pacific, achieve highly in relation to the school’s targets and goals in reading, writing and mathematics and to national expectations. The data shows, Year 8 students achieved 100% in reading, 90% in writing and 93% in mathematics. This high level of achievement has been consistent over the past three years.

1.2 How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

School leaders and teachers respond very well to those Māori and other children at risk of not meeting the school’s achievement expectations. All children identified as at risk of underachievement are appropriately targeted and suitable plans monitored during their time at school to promote ongoing progress.

At the time of this ERO evaluation, the school’s assessment information showed many of those children identified, at the beginning of 2016 had accelerated progress by the end of that year. Of the small group of Māori children identified in targets at the beginning of 2017, most are on track to likely achieve at or above expectation by the end of the year.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Leaders and trustees have an appropriate strategic approach to sustaining and building the school’s capacity and teachers’ capability to promote equitable outcomes and excellence for all learners. Reports presented to trustees are comprehensive. They enable trustees to monitor progress toward the school’s achievement targets and goals.

Teachers are highly reflective practitioners. School processes enable teachers to know students’ strengths, interests and learning needs well. Teachers’ ability to make dependable judgements about children’s progress and achievement is supported by clear guidelines and effective moderation practice.

Children identified with additional learning, health or social needs are very well catered for through a range of considered and collaboratively designed individualised learning programmes.

Teachers work collaboratively in a coherent manner to improve teaching practice and outcomes for all learners. Schoolwide professional learning, teacher inquiry and internal evaluation are very well considered and appropriate. These align with curriculum innovations and to the school’s desired approach to teaching and learning.

Sustaining a positive school culture and instilling the school’s vision and values are well considered. Supporting actions include the high level of involvement of families and whānau in their children’s education and by developing attributes and attitudes in children conducive to student led learning. Respectful reciprocal relationships result in an affirming tone that prevails across the school. The learning environment provides a positive context for children’s belonging and wellbeing.

Considered planning enables children to learn through contexts of high interest, both in the school and in the wider community. Students are increasingly more able to take responsibility for their learning. Māori, and all, learners have opportunities to participate in authentic learning experiences reflective of Māori culture, language and identity as an integral part of their schooling experience. The cultural heritages of all the children attending is acknowledged and valued.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence?

Ongoing curriculum review and development aligns clearly with the school’s strategic direction. Guidance for teaching and learning practice continues to evolve in light of this. The pace of development has meant that the school curriculum document has not kept up to date with innovations and evolving practice. ERO’s evaluation affirms the school’s intention to include new approaches for learning as an integral part of the school curriculum.

Leaders and trustees should consider reviewing how they set schoolwide targets to focus more specifically on those learners they know require accelerated progress. Reporting on the rate of progress these students make should enable trustees to better evaluate the impact of deliberate actions aimed at improving outcomes for this group.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • Learner-focused inquiry and collaborative practice that maintains high expectations for teaching and learning

  • curriculum developments and evaluation that responds to students’ language, culture and identity and the local context

  • processes that support teachers and leaders to know about students’ strengths, interests and needs and effective ways of responding to raise levels of progress and achievement.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, development priorities are in:

  • using the school’s effective internal evaluation process to further determine the impact of initiatives on progressing children’s learning and achievement.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in four-to-five years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

16 February 2018

About the school

Location

Porirua

Ministry of Education profile number

2950

School type

Full Primary Years 1 - 8

School roll

387

Gender composition

Male 53%, Female 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori 17%
Pākehā 70%
Pacific 6%
Asian 5%
Other ethnic groups 2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

November 2017

Date of this report

16 February 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review October 2014
Education Review December 2011
Education Review September 2009

Findings

Paremata School has made good progress in improving student achievement in relation to the National Standards. More Māori, Pacific, Asian and students with additional learning requirements are experiencing success. Effective monitoring, teaching and governance contribute to this. Reviewing the school curriculum, teaching as inquiry and appraisal process are key next steps.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Paremata School caters for nearly 400 students in Years 1 to 8 in a northern coastal suburb of Wellington. A diverse school roll comprises 65% New Zealand European/Pākehā, 22% Māori, 6% Asian and 6% Pacific students. The school is inclusive and provides carefully considered support for students with additional learning needs.

Since the December 2011 ERO report, the school has made good progress in improving student achievement. Teachers are developing their use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and culturally responsive teaching practices. Te ao Māori is valued and increasingly represented in the curriculum. There is a focus on providing students with a wide range of learning opportunities.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Achievement information is very well used by the board, school leaders and teachers to make positive changes to students’ progress and achievement in literacy and mathematics.

Māori, Pacific and Asian learners have made good progress in literacy and mathematics since 2012. High proportions of all students achieve in relation to the National Standards. There is an awareness of the need to provide challenge to students to increase the numbers working above the Standards.

Teachers identify and effectively target students who require support to reach the National Standards. Individual learning needs are well-known and addressed. Sound school processes enable students with additional learning requirements to develop suitable learning goals and access external expertise. Thorough monitoring extends students’ progress and achievement.

School leaders and teachers continue to strengthen their use of assessment information from a wide range of evidence. Practices for moderation of teachers' judgements about student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics are developing well.

School strategic targets are clearly focused on ensuring all students reach at least the National Standards for literacy and mathematics. There is a deliberate strategy of early intervention, and close tracking of students’ progress in reaching school targets. Parents are well-informed about extra programmes and are provided with suggestions to further assist their child’s learning at home.

Parents receive comprehensive reports that show their child’s achievement in relation to the National Standards, the key competencies and other curriculum areas. Students contribute written reflections on their progress in the reporting process with their parents.

ERO identified that school leaders should improve the reporting to the board about the impact of special programmes to include information about progress in relation to individual education plan goals.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school curriculum strongly supports students’ learning in reading, writing and mathematics. Key competencies and the school values are highly evident in how students learn. Student wellbeing is well-monitored and issues attended to. School leaders are currently reviewing the breadth and implementation of the curriculum across the school.

Since 2011, te ao Māori has been increasingly incorporated in classroom programmes and students’ learning inquiries. Students enjoy programmes that regularly celebrate each other’s cultures. Teachers are developing more culturally responsive teaching approaches for Māori learners.

Effective teaching strategies assist students’ purposeful engagement in learning. Independence and self-management are encouraged. Teachers value and respond to individual ideas and preferences. Critical thinking skills and questioning strategies improve students’ understanding. Collaborative learning is encouraged with students assisting each other in their learning.

A strong focus on growing teachers' professional practice in literacy and mathematics leads to improved teaching. Teaching teams recently developed high schoolwide expectations for effective teaching based on a sound research base. Improving staff use of ICT as a learning tool is ongoing. These practices are becoming embedded across the school.

ERO’s evaluation recommends that the review of the curriculum should be extended to include consideration of the school's:

  • mission, values, key competencies and essential learning areas to better integrate them with recent developments in effective teaching, ICT and student inquiry-learning
  • expectations for culturally responsive teaching practices for Māori learners
  • planned response to the Ministry of Education’s Pasifika Education Plan 2013-2017 for Pacific learners.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

Since 2011, schoolwide practices have strengthened to support Māori leaners’ language, culture and identity.

The school kapa haka group for Years 3 to 8 has grown to over one hundred students. School tutors, affiliated with Ngāti Toa, contribute to students confidently enjoying regular opportunities for karakia, waiata, pōwhiri and performances. Meaningful Māori student leadership roles and school events affirm their cultural heritage.

The board’s strategic decision-making makes the availability of curriculum time and resources to support success for Māori a priority. This includes expectations for students to learn about local Māori history. Teachers are making good progress in regularly using instructional te reo Māori and providing te reo Māori programmes across the school.

The next steps for school leaders and teachers are to continue to embed their use of te reo Māori in classrooms and to continue to develop interesting and challenging te reo Māori programmes for students.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to continue to improve student achievement and progress in relation to the National Standards and other areas of the curriculum.

Robust monitoring of student achievement targets improves the school’s performance, particularly for Māori and Pacific learners.

The complementary skills of the principal and deputy principal contribute to effective change management that improves student outcomes. Growing staff leadership in teaching teams is underway.

School leaders are continuing to strengthen their understandings and use of in-depth self review as part of the ongoing review of the school curriculum. Further work is planned to improve teachers’ formal inquiry into their practices and its use in the appraisal process.

The strengths in school governance identified by ERO in 2011 have been sustained. Trustees skilfully use their expertise to review policies and strategic priorities. They are highly involved in school activities and focused in their support for raising student achievement. They prudently manage school finances and property. They make decisions that contribute to better outcomes.

School leaders and trustees should continue to strengthen strategic consultation and decisionmaking based on community input. This should include specific Māori and Pacific contributions to the review of the school’s curriculum and strategic plan.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Paremata School has made good progress in improving student achievement in relation to the National Standards. More Māori, Pacific, Asian and students with additional learning requirements are experiencing success. Effective monitoring, teaching and governance contribute to this. Reviewing the school curriculum, teaching as inquiry and appraisal process are key next steps.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three year.Image removed.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services

Central Region

21 October 2014

About the School

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2950

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

378

Gender composition

Male 51%

Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European

Pacific

Asian

Other ethnic groups

22%

65%

6%

6%

1%

Review team on site

September 2014

Date of this report

21 October 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2011

September 2009

August 2006