Hataitai School

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Summary

Hataitai School isa Years 1 to 8 primary in suburban Wellington.The roll of 353 children at the time of this review, includes two percent who are Māori, two percent Pacific and others from a diverse range of ethnicities.

senior leaders continue to promote a reflective and responsive organisational culture that supports developing practice and ongoing improvement. Regular property development has upgraded a number of teaching areas to better support modern learning practices.Since the September 2014 ERO evaluation,

Hataitai School is a member of the Wellington East Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako (CoL).

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Hataitai School is effective in achieving very good learning outcomes for children.

It responds well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Useful processes support children to achieve. There are some examples of reduced disparity of achievement between groups of students within the school. However, information for 2014 to 2016 shows that the school has not yet achieved equitable learning outcomes for Māori students in reading and writing.

Further developments to support the school’s ongoing improvement involve extending the use of innovative learning practices and refining strategic planning.

earners are achieving well. The school demonstrates some good progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.L

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to those Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Hataitai School responds well to those Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The school’s 2016 student achievement data shows that most children achieve well in relation to National Standards and that all or almost all achieve at or above the Standards at Year 8. Overall achievement at or above the Standards in reading, writing and mathematics has remained consistently high from 2014 to 2016. In 2016, Māori children’s achievement in mathematics is similar to their peers in the school. Pacific children’s progress is tracked individually by senior leaders.

There are some examples of reduced disparity of achievement between groups of students within the school. However, the information for 2014 to 2016 shows that the school has not yet achieved and sustained in-school equity of learning outcomes for Māori students in reading and writing.

Students with additional learning needs are closely monitored. They benefit from well-designed programmes to meet their individual learning needs. Their progress is tracked to evaluate how effectively interventions are promoting their achievement.

Teachers use a variety of useful moderation processes to ensure the dependability of their assessment judgements about children’s achievement in relation to National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The inclusive culture of the school supports children’s wellbeing for success to reach their potential. Senior leaders and teachers value the importance of knowing children and families very well. This, and an ethic of care, is modelled by the senior leadership team.

Trustees and senior leaders attribute children’s success to the school’s ongoing connectedness with families, and the vision and values that underpin school operations. Parents have many opportunities for input to the strategic decision making and direction of the school and to know about their children’s learning. The school’s community provides strong support in a variety of ways.

Teachers use a range of useful, school-based and standardised assessment tools. Achievement information is used well by staff to plan learning programmes to respond to children’s individual learning needs. Specific learning goals are developed for each student and are shared with parents and whānau. Their progress is well monitored, tracked and reported.

Teachers are increasingly personalising learning. There is a strong emphasis on developing children’s awareness and management of their own learning. Their input is valued by staff and informs teaching programmes and the choice of activities offered.Ongoing review of the school curriculum includes the development and use of digital technology and inquiry learning to enhance engagement and achievement.

Children benefit from positive, affirming relationships with their teachers. The purposeful, settled and attractive environments promote learning. Children are highly engaged in, and talk knowledgeably about, their learning.

extensive opportunities to participate and celebrate success in cultural, artistic, sporting and leadership activities. Many activities and events enable students to learn about and celebrate Māori culture and language.The inclusive curriculum provides children with

Senior leaders encourage teachers to lead aspects of the curriculum. Professional development is appropriately focused on introducing new methodologies and growing teachers’ professional practice. Teachers use research and evidence to inquire into the effectiveness of strategies and approaches intended to enhance engagement and promote improved outcomes for children.

The board is well informed about the progress and achievement that children make over time. Trustees bring expertise and skills to their roles and undertake relevant board training. They scrutinise student achievement information and focus on enhancing learning and achievement.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has many structures and processes in place to raise children’s achievement, and is well placed to continue making improvements that impact positively on children’s learning.

Next steps are to:

  • maintain the focus on identifying and reducing in-school disparity of learning outcomes for Māori and other students
  • refine strategic planning to include clear indicators of expected outcomes for learners that will support and enhance internal evaluation and continuous improvement
  • continue to extend and embed the schoolwide teaching philosophies and practices that promote innovative educational practices to extend student agency.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates some good progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Next steps are to:

  • maintain the focus on identifying and reducing in-school disparity of learning outcomes for Māori and other students
  • refine strategic planning to include clear indicators of expected outcomes that will support and enhance internal evaluation and continuous improvement
  • continue to extend and embed the school wide teaching philosophies and practices that promote innovative educational practices to extend student agency.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

28 November 2017

About the school

Location

Hataitai School, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2854

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

353

Gender composition

Male 51%, Female 49%

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā
Asian
Pacific
Other ethnic groups

  2%
79%
  6%
  2%
11%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

28 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review
Education Review
Education Review

September 2014
September 2011
December 2008

Findings

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The majority of students achieve at and above in relation to National Standards. Change is well-considered. Curriculum review and improving the use of student achievement information are ongoing developments. A supportive, inclusive environment for students, families and whānau is evident.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Hataitai School in Wellington has a roll of 342 students in Years 1 to 8.

The principal, teachers and trustees are committed to educating students to be engaged and successful learners in a values-based setting. Cooperative and respectful relationships are evident amongst students and with teachers.

Parents and whānau are valued as important partners in their children’s learning. A welcoming environment contributes to students’ and their families’ strong sense of belonging with the school.

At the time of ERO's 2011 review, the principal had just been appointed. Since then she has worked closely with staff to develop a collaborative and positive working environment. Significant progress has been made in addressing the areas for further development identified in ERO's previous report.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school is improving its use of achievement information to make positive changes to learners' engagement, progress and achievement.

Teachers’ judgements about students' achievement in relation to the National Standards have been further strengthened. Teachers work together, and with external advisers, to moderate their overall their assessment decisions. Assessment schedules and guidelines are in place to support these practices and are being used to inform teaching and learning.

Teachers regularly reflect on the achievement and progress of identified learners. Team reviews of priority students identified on a learning needs register are collated to form a summary of teaching strategies being used to support them. This information is reported to the board. Including individual student goals and expected outcomes within teaching strategies should assist teachers to better monitor progress and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of interventions and initiatives.

The school's achievement information shows that the majority of students achieve National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics, with significant groups achieving above the standard in reading and mathematics. Assessment information in 2012 and 2013 shows improvement in these two learning areas.

Data is analysed to identify groups of students whose rates of progress could be improved. Identifying specific targets and actions for these students should help to monitor their progress.

A review of reports to parents and whānau has led to changes in the way information is reported. Families receive good commentaries about their child’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

Plans to further develop student achievement records online should continue to promote increased understanding and involvement of students and their families and whānau in assessment and learning.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

A review of the school’s curriculum has been a significant focus for the school. The curriculum is now aligned with the principles of The New Zealand Curriculum. The review has enabled exploration of its relevance for students, families and the community.

The curriculum document provides a useful schoolwide framework for teaching and learning. The introduction of a ‘concept’ approach to learning provides opportunities for team planning and an integrated focus to curriculum implementation across learning areas. All students, including Māori, have opportunities to learn about te ao Māori.

Ongoing refinement and review of the curriculum should ensure local features and cultural aspects are woven into all learning areas. This should help to reflect the aspirations for successful learning held by parents, whānau, students and staff.

Students engage in learning in environments that are calm and inclusive. Their self-management skills are promoted and supported by teachers. Students confidently participate in class activities. Effective use of questioning enables students to articulate their understanding and ideas.

Elements of inquiry learning are continuing to be developed by teachers. This should contribute to increased opportunities for students to direct and own their learning. Teachers focus on being responsive to students’ needs and identify strategies to enable all students to be successful.

A small group of Pacific students attend the school. Their achievement is tracked and monitored and shows that most are achieving well in relation to National Standards. The school is considering ways to better respond to the cultures, languages and identities of the Pacific students and relationships with their families.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The board, senior leaders and staff recognise the unique position of Māori as tangata whenua in their school charter and curriculum.

Māori students have a good range of opportunities to identify with and lead aspects of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori. Regular meetings with whānau provide avenues for them to discuss and contribute to plans and developments for Māori students and their families.

Most Māori students achieve well in relation to National Standards, particularly in mathematics. Their achievement is regularly reported and reviewed to ensure their needs are being addressed. A well-planned te reo Māori programme is in place at all year levels.

The board, senior leaders and ERO discussed and agreed that there is a need to develop, in consultation with whānau, a strategic approach to Māori students’ success as Māori. This should further strengthen the opportunities Māori students have to experience success as Māori and teachers’ culturally responsive practices.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The school charter and strategic plan identify school priorities and areas for development. Regular reviews by teams contribute to principal’s reports to the board on progress in relation to goals and actions in the annual plan.

This process should be further strengthened to include more specific goals and expected student outcomes. This will assist leaders to evaluate how each goal has contributed to improving student progress and achievement.

The principal has led well-considered change with a strong focus on all students achieving the best possible outcomes. Senior leaders actively foster a collaborative community that enables teachers to share and learn together. Teachers’ strengths are valued and used in leadership roles.

A culture of trust enables teachers to observe and reflect on each others' teaching. This is supported through targeted professional development and learning conversations.

A newly introduced process for teachers to consider how well their practices are improving students’ learning should help them better evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching. Including needs-based feedback through teacher appraisal should also support ongoing development of individual practice.

Board members bring a diverse range of skills and knowledge to their governance roles. New trustees are developing an understanding of school governance and the importance of student data in decision-making. Trustees are clearly focused on enabling all students to experience success.

A supportive and inclusive environment for families, whānau and students is evident. Parents’ contributions are welcomed and encouraged.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The majority of students achieve at and above in relation to National Standards. Change is well-considered. Curriculum review and improving the use of student achievement information are ongoing developments. A supportive, inclusive environment for students, families and whānau is evident.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

26 September 2014

About the School

Location

Hataitai, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2854

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

342

Gender composition

Males 54%,

Females 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Asian

Samoan

Other ethnic groups

2%

87%

9%

1%

1%

Review team on site

July 2014

Date of this report

26 September 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2011

December 2008

January 2006