Glenview School (Porirua East)

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Summary

Glenview School, in Porirua, has 76 students in Years 1 to 6. Of those students enrolled, 49 are of Pacific heritage and 20 identify as Māori.A large majority of students are English language learners. The school’s MANA values - manaaki, akoga, nature, aiga - arewell-known throughout the school.These valuesfocus on supporting children’s learning and wellbeing.

Since the October 2014 ERO report, Glenview School has had a change in leadership, with the appointment of the principal in 2015. Experienced and recently elected members make up the board of trustees.

Teachers are regularly involved in external professional learning and development to promote positive learner outcomes. The current schoolwide focus is mathematics, with a continued emphasis on literacy.

The school is part of the Porirua East Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school needs and continues to strengthen its response to those children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Since the previous ERO review, data shows a positive trajectory of improvement in achievement in relation to National Standards, particularly for Māori children.

Data for 2016, indicated that many learners achieved at and above in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The school continues to focus on raising Pacific students’ achievement in mathematics. Disparity between girls and boys in mathematics fluctuates over time.To increase equitable student outcomes, the school needs to sharpen the focus on accelerating learning for those children who are at risk of underachieving.

Student wellbeing and pastoral care are key areas of focus for trustees, leaders and teachers. This includes support for families and whānau.

The school agrees to:

  • continue to improve the consistency of targeted planning schoolwide to accelerate progress for learners

  • more regularly monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school needs and continues to strengthen its response to those children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

School achievement data for 2016, showed thatin relation to National Standards, Māori learners achieve at higher levels than their peers in the school in reading and mathematics and are comparable in writing.

In reading, three quarters of children achieve at or above in relation to National Standards. Twothirds of learners achieve in writing, with slightly fewer students achieving in mathematics.

The school has yet to have Pacific children achieving as well as their school peers in reading and mathematics.

Teachers know students well and use assessment tools to identify, respond to and monitor individual learning needs.The school recognises the need to strengthen moderation practices, in particular, in reading and mathematics and to work with other schools.

Children with additional learning needs are well identified and appropriately supported. External agencies are accessed when required.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

High expectations for positive behaviour and culturally responsive and inclusive learning environments contribute to purposeful learning for all students. Student engagement is supported by well promoted school values and positive, respectful relationships between children and with adults.The uniqueness of each child is valued.

Children are well supported to participate positively and contribute to school life.They enjoy a sense of belonging and connection to the school and community.Meaningful learning experiences align to students’ culture, identity and language and are enhanced by community involvement.

Leaders and teachers work effectively with families, whānau and external agencies to enable student needs to be identified and addressed.Families, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities. The school seeks whānau voice in supporting the setting of the school’s strategic direction.

Leaders and teachers work collaboratively and they are improvement focused. The board receives a range of information about student achievement to inform decision making about resourcing.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Trustees, leaders and teachers have a clear focus on improving student wellbeing.To sustain focus on student learning, trustees should continue to build knowledge of their stewardship role through ongoing professional learning and development.

Leaders and teachers continue to develop clear expectations for teaching practice and assessment as part of the ongoing curriculum review. The school should consider evaluating the effectiveness of practice and progress against their Māori and Pacific Action Plans. Further development ofteacher capability, through a sharpened focus on acceleration, should contribute to improved student outcomes.

Systematicinternal evaluation requires development to more effectively and formally measure the impact and effectiveness of teaching programmes, initiatives and resourcing on student outcomes.

To promote equity and excellence, ERO’s external evaluation affirms trustees’ and leaders’ ongoing developments in:

  • strengthening the curriculum, to support effective teaching practice and assessment for improved achievement of those children at risk of not achieving
  • strengthening the appraisal process, including teacher inquiry to build teacher capability
  • reporting to the board about the accelerated progress and achievement of those students whose learning is at risk.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. Leaders and teachersknow the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated. For sustained improvement and future learner success they need to:

  • further develop, implement and evaluate approaches to effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • further improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • continue to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • continue to improve the consistency of targeted planning schoolwide to accelerate progress for learners

  • more regularly monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

In agreement with the school, ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

14 November 2017

About the school

Location

Porirua

Ministry of Education profile number

2847

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

76

Gender composition

Male 41, Female 35

Ethnic composition

Māori 20
Tokelauan 21
Samoan 21
Other Pacific 7
Other ethnic groups 7

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

14 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, October 2014
Education Review, April 2011
Education Review, February 2008

Findings

Classes are settled with students on task and engaged in their learning. Relationships are positive and respectful. The language, culture and identity of Māori and Pacific students are recognised, valued and supported. School leaders understand the importance of continuing to develop the use of achievement information for informing planning to foster positive student outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Glenview School is a small school in Porirua East that caters for students in Years 1 to 6. The roll of 79 students includes 18 who are Māori, 23 Tokelauan and 18 Samoan. Staff members are representative of these cultural groups and provide role models for students.

The school’s vision is: “Active learners, leaders, guardians of the world. Ngā akonga manawanui, ngā rangitira ā ngā kaitiaki o te ao”.

These elements are reflected in the curriculum and commitment to the EnviroSchool philosophy. The semi-rural setting provides spacious grounds for students' physical development and community garden projects.

The April 2011 ERO report indicated the need for continued development of self review to determine curriculum effectiveness for raising achievement. Since then a new board has been elected. Teachers have participated in professional learning and development (PLD) for teaching and learning in literacy.

The school provides an inclusive, welcoming environment for students and their families. Student attendance is high.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school is developing its processes for using student achievement information more effectively to promote engagement and learning.

Teachers use an appropriate range of nationally referenced assessment tools to gather baseline data on students. This is used to inform class placements, group for instruction and identify students in need of additional support.

School leaders use data to set schoolwide achievement targets and report to the board on trends, patterns, initiatives and programmes. The board responds by planning resourcing and staffing. Enhancing the analysis and use of student achievement information to more clearly identify trends and patterns should help with setting more specific, measurable targets.

A high proportion of students have English as a second language. These students are suitably supported in their learning by a teacher and teacher-aide who have had specialist training.

Families and whānau are well informed about student achievement through regular reports and three-way student, family and teacher conferences.

The school reports that the majority of students are achieving at or above in relation to the relevant National Standard in reading. Students do not achieve as well in writing and mathematics. These areas of continuing focus have been supported by externally facilitated teacher PLD. Māori learners achieve at levels comparable with other students in the school. Teachers are working to enhance the consistency and reliability of moderation processes and judgements against the National Standards.

School leaders recognise the importance of continuing to focus on developing teachers' use of student achievement information. Ongoing PLD to support the improved use of classroom data is needed. This should enhance the analysis and use of achievement information for tracking progress and measuring the impact of programmes and initiatives.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Student engagement and learning is well promoted by the school’s curriculum.

Clear documentation effectively guides teachers' integration of values, key competencies and learning areas in programme design. Relevant local contexts are used. Literacy and numeracy strategies are evident across all learning areas. The MANA (Manaaki-Akoga-Nature-Aiga) values reflect the cultural make-up of the school. These values reinforce expectation for behaviour and learning and are strongly promoted. There is an appropriate focus on increasing the use of digital technology to support student engagement and learning.

The curriculum provides many opportunities for students to participate and celebrate success in a wide range of academic, sporting, cultural and leadership activities.

Classes are settled. Students are on task and engaged in their learning. Relationships among students and teachers are positive and respectful. There is a productive working atmosphere across the school.

Teachers are highly reflective and regularly inquire into ways to improve their practice. Extensive, detailed observational notes support their inquiry. As part of this cycle, building in a consistent data-based analysis of the outcomes for students should strengthen the process.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The language, culture and identity of Māori students is recognised, valued and supported. Regular engagement and consultation with families and whānau have informed the development of strategic charter goals for Māori student success.

Teachers and leaders have used the Ministry of Education document Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners to help develop their MASAM (Māori achieving success as Māori) framework for culturally responsive practices. This document provides clear guidelines for teachers to grow their capability to meet the aims and aspirations of students and whānau.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Pacific students?

Pacific students’ cultures and languages are strongly supported throughout the school curriculum. Families are warmly welcomed in the school and encouraged to be fully involved with their child’s learning. Programmes such as Reading Together have been well attended by many families with positive outcomes for students.

Teachers and leaders have used the Ministry of Education Pacific Education Plan to help develop their PASAP (Pasifika achieving success as Pasifika) framework for improving student achievement and developing culturally responsive practices.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is developing its capacity to sustain and improve its performance.

The board of trustees were all newly elected in 2013. They are undertaking appropriate training and access support when needed. After a recent period of unsettledness, a new chairperson was elected. Trustees are reviewing their policies and practices and developing their understanding of roles and responsibilities. They are well informed about student achievement and school operation.

The principal and teachers work collaboratively. Leadership is shared and teachers are encouraged to initiate and contribute to programmes, plans or ongoing development. Teacher appraisal processes are being reviewed. Bringing all the parts under one framework should enhance its effectiveness in guiding and supporting teacher development.

Parents, whānau and aiga are actively involved in the school. There is a growing partnership between school and home, focused on student engagement, learning and progress.

Board and staff are improvement focused. Leaders and teachers regularly review what they have done. The quality and usefulness of this reflection should be improved by the use of data and achievement information to measure the impact on student achievement. ERO, leaders and trustees agree that measuring the effectiveness of initiatives and programmes is likely to enhance decision-making and support planning.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Classes are settled with students on task and engaged in their learning. Relationships are positive and respectful. The language, culture and identity of Māori and Pacific students are recognised, valued and supported. School leaders understand the importance of continuing to develop the use of achievement information for informing planning to foster positive student outcomes.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie

National Manager Review Services Central Region

14 October 2014Image removed.

About the School

Location

Porirua

Ministry of Education profile number

2847

School type

Contributing Primary (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

79

Gender composition

Female 42, Male 37

Ethnic composition

Tokelauan

Māori

Samoan

Asian

Other Pacific

Other ethnic groups

23

18

18

9

7

4

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

14 October 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

April 2011

February 2008

May 2005