Evans Bay Intermediate

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Education institution number:
2837
School type:
Intermediate
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
399
Telephone:
Address:

14 Kemp Street, Kilbirnie, Wellington

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Summary

Evans Bay Intermediate in Kilbirnie, Wellington, is a school that is culturally diverse. Of the 442 children enrolled, 17% identify as Māori, 13% as Asian and 11% Pacific.

Since the July 2014 ERO report, leadership has changed in the school. A new principal was appointed in July 2015 and new deputy and assistant principals in 2017. Board membership changed in 2016, including a new board chair.

The values of respect, whanaungatanga and success are highly evident in student designed displays. The school’s vision of ‘expanding the horizons of all our akonga’ is enacted through the many opportunities provided for students.

In 2016, teachers undertook professional learning and development (PLD) in mathematics. This has continued in 2017. Leaders are participating in leadership PLD with external providers. Positive Behaviour for Learning has been revisited and strengthened with restorative practice PLD planned for later in the year.

Leaders have taken Ministry of Education (MoE) advice as they strengthen systems focused on accelerating learners’ achievement and reducing disparity. A range of new initiatives has been implemented since the previous ERO review, designed to support improved learner outcomes.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is developing its approach to supporting children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. Rates of progress in reading have remained similar over time, with a slight dip in writing and mathematics in 2016, attributed to improved dependability of achievement information. Processes for targeting students and monitoring their achievement are strengthening. The particular focus for 2017 is mathematics. The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for boys, Māori and Pacific children remains.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

School leaders are strongly focused on developing and embedding consistent schoolwide practices to support children whose learning and achievement need acceleration and to reduce disparity. This includes new processes for targeting learning and aligning processes for teaching as inquiry that link to the strategic and annual plans.

In 2016, the school reported that most learners, including Māori, were at or above in relation to the National Standard in reading. Māori achievement was similar to Pākehā in reading. Although many achieve at or above the Standards in writing and mathematics, Māori and Pacific children achieved at significantly lower levels than their peers. In 2017, school achievement targets are focused on Year 8. Teachers have clearly identified each child who is below the standard and the need for focused, effective teaching to support improved learning outcomes.

Leaders acknowledge that further work is needed to achieve equitable learning opportunities for boys and Māori and Pacific children. ERO’s evaluation affirms this imperative. The school’s action plans for Māori and for Pacific learners have been amalgamated into the 2017-19 charter to align priorities and schoolwide initiatives.

In 2016, moderation processes were revisited and strengthened to ensure teacher judgements about achievement were based on valid and reliable data. This has informed the sharper focus in 2017 on target learners and the accompanying expectations for acceleration of their progress. Leaders are monitoring the impact of the actions taken and expect a reduction in disparity.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school is strengthening its approach to supporting children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. It is following guidance provided by the MoE about targeting learners whose achievement requires acceleration and developing teacher capacity. All learners who are below and well below in relation to the National Standards in mathematics have been identified and clear guidance given to teachers on how to provide for them.

The board of trustees is resourcing the development of the new leadership team. This action aligns with school priorities and goals. Leaders are improvement focused and strategic as they build teacher capacity and seek to improve outcomes for learners.

Children work in an orderly and supportive environment. The revised curriculum and learner profile supports children to have increased understanding and ownership of their learning.

Practices to support the dependability of teachers’ assessment judgements about National Standards in mathematics and writing were examined by staff in 2016 and useful guidelines established. The current mathematics PLD is strengthening assessment practices.

Teachers are encouraged to reflect on the effectiveness of their practice through a newly implemented teacher inquiry process alongside gathering information to support the renewal of their Practising Certificates. 

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Senior leaders know that the school needs to strengthen its response to accelerating the learning and achievement of learners who are not achieving in relation to National Standards. Consequently, they have recently redeveloped processes that focus on achieving equity and excellence. They are aware that these changed expectations now need monitoring and embedding to achieve improved and sustained outcomes for all children. The next steps they have identified include:

  • curriculum redevelopment, looking at cultural responsiveness and more integration of learning

  • continuing the focus on improving outcomes for Māori and Pacific students

  • developing greater data literacy across the school

  • continuing the focus on relationships and wellbeing

  • continuing to build the effectiveness of teachers and the leadership team

  • forging strong liaisons with their partner schools in the Community of Learning

  • continuing to be reflective and strengthening understanding and implementation of internal evaluation.

ERO‘s evaluation affirms leaders’ identified priorities and emphasises the need for ongoing focus to improve and sustain positive outcomes for all students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014. 

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were no international students attending the school.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of children’s learning and achievement

  • need to further build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Alan Wynyard

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

11 August 2017

About the school

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2837

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 and 8)

School roll

442

Gender composition

Female 52%, Male 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori 17%
Pākehā 50%
Asian 13%
Pacific 11%
Other ethnic groups 9%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

11 August 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review July 2014
Education Review August 2011
Education Review January 2006

 

Findings

The school’s broad curriculum successfully promotes and supports student learning in many ways. An increased focus on assisting those students not meeting National Standards expectations is enhancing teaching and learning. Trustees and senior leaders use regular self review to monitor progress towards goals and determine future priorities. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Evans Bay Intermediate caters for Years 7 and 8 students in Kilbirnie, Wellington. The roll is multicultural, with 17% of students identifying as Māori and 14% as Pacific. Students learn in an inclusive setting.

The school hosts a satellite of Kimi Ora Special School. The satellite has been onsite for two years. The school has focused on building relationships with the staff and students of the satellite classrooms.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school purposefully uses a range of student achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, achievement and progress.

In 2013, most students achieved at or above in relation to the National Standards. Schoolwide reports clearly show comparative data for gender and ethnicity. Strengths and weaknesses for different groups are appropriately analysed. Māori students do not yet experience success at similar levels to all students. The board and senior leaders recognise that achievement for Pacific students is of significant concern. The school charter appropriately aims to see Māori and Pacific students more engaged and enjoying educational success.

Students not yet achieving against National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics are well identified and targeted for additional support. Teachers use deliberate strategies to assist their learning. The progress of these students is tracked. The principal collates information about progress towards schoolwide targets and reports this to the board during the year.

In 2013, 88% of the target student group made progress. The next step is for staff to consider and define how much progress they expect students to make: while in the target group; during their time at the school; and for their future schooling.

Teachers have further developed moderation processes to support reliable overall teacher judgements about students' achievement in relation to the Standards. They are beginning to use samples of work in essential learning areas beyond English and mathematics. This assessment development is ongoing and ERO’s evaluation affirms this as an appropriate direction.

Students' transitions into the school and on to secondary education are organised and well considered. Students with special needs are capably supported. Staff collect a wide range of useful information about students’ strengths and needs and their parents’ aspirations. Liaison between the school and external agencies is suitably managed.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s curriculum successfully promotes and supports student learning in many ways. An emphasis on school values of success, whanaungatanga, respect and thinking underpin school culture and classroom programmes. Learning experiences are broad, with opportunities for extension in areas of student strength and interest. Student leadership is fostered.

A move to using more digital technology in classrooms is providing students with opportunities to engage with and share their learning. Online forums are assisting greater use of immediate feedback on learning and improved partnerships with parents.

Staff are beginning to explore student-led inquiry that integrates learning areas. This provides students with further choices and engagement in areas of interest, and influences curriculum experiences.

Expectations for effective teaching are clearly outlined for teachers and linked closely to best practice indicators. These guidelines emphasise the importance of students setting and knowing about their learning goals and next steps.

An inclusive school culture effectively supports wellbeing and learning. ERO observed classrooms where students were settled, positive and engaged in purposeful learning. Senior leaders and the board include and support students with special needs. A senior leader coordinates their programmes of learning.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The board demonstrates a strategic and ongoing commitment to the promotion of te ao Māori and to strengthening partnership with Māori whānau.

Significant elements of te ao Māori are now well embedded in school culture and the wider curriculum. Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are valued and fostered in an inclusive setting.

The recently released Ka Hikitia: Accelerating Success 2013-2017 triggered internal reflection about how well the school is supporting success for Māori as Māori.

An action plan has been written to strengthen the bicultural curriculum and improve partnership with whānau Māori. To strengthen planning, the school should consider how:

  • Tātaiako: Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners could be used to deliberately foster teachers’ cultural competence and confidence
  • classroom programmes and environments could more explicitly reflect te ao Māori and use Māori learners’ identity, language and culture in learning.

In further developing the action plan, the school should consider making the plan measurable, in terms of defining what the hopes are for Māori learners' achievement.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Pacific as Pacific?

Many initiatives promote the languages, cultures and identities of Pacific students and provide a strong platform for success as Pacific. The Ministry of Education's Pasifika Education Plan has been discussed and in response, the school is strengthening learning partnerships with all Pacific parents. The school has considered other actions for raising Pacific success within the annual plan. It is timely to consider in-depth review of how successful teaching and learning programmes are for Pacific students and to more deeply consider how to increase the pace of improvement.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

The principal and senior leaders undertake regular self review to monitor progress towards goals, respond to key findings and determine future priorities. Reviews include the use of student and parent surveys at times. The purpose of review is improvement for students. Review should be strengthened by deciding evaluative indicators prior to the start of initiatives.

Schoolwide data is regularly collated, analysed and reported to the board. These reports are detailed documents which senior leaders use in decision-making about programmes of learning. Such reporting is less useful for trustees to help them see the overall picture of student progress and that of priority groups. Streamlining reporting is a useful next step.

The principal knows about the quality of teaching schoolwide and meets regularly with individual teachers to discuss the progress they are making with target students. Staff professional development is suitably referenced to best practices for effective teaching. Appraisal is developmentally focused and linked to schoolwide priorities. Alignment between appraisal goals, schoolwide targets and teachers’ inquiries should be further strengthened.

A changed leadership model in 2014 allows syndicate teams more time to collaborate and share ideas. This initiative is promoting collegiality, shared leadership and consistency in teaching practice for students.

Teachers are encouraged to reflect on how their programmes and classroom teaching impact on students’ learning. A new review process for evaluating programmes of learning is becoming more inquiry based. The next steps are to strengthen teaching as inquiry and to create further opportunities for syndicate teams to share emerging good practices schoolwide.

Trustees are highly representative of their parent community and bring a range of skills to governance. They focus on raising student achievement, setting appropriate goals and targets. Board self review is regular and trustees actively participate in a range of professional development.

The school’s values, climate, culture and community engagement and relationships provide a solid foundation for sustaining and improving student learning.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

The school’s broad curriculum successfully promotes and supports student learning in many ways. An increased focus on assisting those students not meeting National Standards expectations is enhancing teaching and learning. Trustees and senior leaders use regular self review to monitor progress towards goals and determine future priorities. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Joyce Gebbie
National Manager Review Services Central Region

14 July 2014

Image removed.About the School

Location

Kilbirnie, Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

2837

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

406

Gender composition

Male 52%, Female 48%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

Other ethnic groups

17%

52%

14%

17%

Special Features

Attached satellite class from Kimi Ora School

Review team on site

May 2014

Date of this report

14 July 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

August 2011

September 2008

January 2006