Waimarama School

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Education institution number:
2718
School type:
Contributing
School gender:
Co-Educational
Definition:
Not Applicable
Total roll:
15
Telephone:
Address:

27 Taupunga Road, Waimarama Beach, Havelock North

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Findings

Very good progress has occurred since the 2016 ERO report.  Development and improvement of school conditions that promote positive outcomes for students are evident.  The curriculum and teaching practices reflect a Māori world view. A positive shift in student achievement is evident. Continuing to strengthen school leadership and governance capability should support ongoing improvement and sustainability.

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO ‘s overall evaluation judgement of Waimārama School performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Developing.

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

Waimārama School is a contributing primary school located in the coastal settlement of Waimārama. It caters for students from Years 1 to 6. All 11 students attending the school identify as Māori.

The school is situated beside Waimārama Marae. The school enjoys a positive relationship with the Waimārama Kōhanga Reo.

Since the May 2016 ERO report, significant changes have occurred. A new board was appointed in 2017. A sole charge principal was appointed in term two, 2018. A new administrator was employed in 2019 and a principal release teacher joined the school in 2020. Significant improvements have been made to the indoor and outdoor learning environments.

The previous report identified several areas for improvement. Over the past four years the school has participated in an ongoing ERO evaluation process to support improvement. The principal and board have received ongoing support from the Ministry of Education (the Ministry) to bring about the changes required.

The school is part of the Flaxmere Kāhui Ako.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

The greatest need was to enhance board capability for effective stewardship and strengthen principal leadership for high quality teaching and learning. Areas of focus to support this have included:

  • developing a deliberate approach to effectively respond to children whose learning and achievement requires acceleration

  • developing a responsive, localised curriculum to guide effective teaching and learning

  • supporting the principal’s professional leadership

  • enhancing board capability and understanding of their stewardship role.

Progress

A collective responsibility and an ongoing focus on creating a learning environment that is conducive to student’s wellbeing and learning is highly evident. Students are nurtured through affirming interactions with all staff. Students are acknowledged for who they are and what they bring. Their efforts are affirmed and celebrated, promoting a sense of belonging.

An effective programme that reflects a Māori world view is being implemented to promote students’ social and emotional skills. High expectations and routines provide structure for the day and promotes engagement in learning. Students engage in a range of authentic learning contexts within the local community, including the Marae, enhancing learning opportunities.

End of 2019 school reported achievement information, shows that most students achieved at or above expectation in reading. A large majority achieved in writing and less than half in mathematics. There is evidence of a positive shift in achievement from 2018, across all areas.

The principal has developed systems and processes to track, monitor and report the progress of all students. Achievement targets are appropriately focused on those students whose learning requires acceleration.

The curriculum is well developed with clear alignment to the principles, values and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum . The school’s values are highly evident and reflect a Māori world view. It appropriately guides effective teaching and learning and incorporates programmes that are evidence-based and designed for Māori and indigenous contexts.

The principal has strengthened systems and processes to support school operation, well informed by current research and best practice. She continues to be well supported through a number of professional networks and is proactive in seeking advice and guidance from external agencies. Appraisal is appropriately focused on progressing strategic priorities and building leadership capability.

The board has strengthened their understanding of the governance role including reviewing and developing policies and procedures. They are very well informed about school operations, curriculum and student achievement. A board work plan is in place which supports them in meeting all statutory requirements.

Consultation with parents and whānau has informed the development of the school’s charter. It clearly sets out strategic priorities and actions to achieve these. Progress is closely monitored and reported. Outcome measures are identified and used to evaluate the impact of actions on outcomes for students.

Key next steps

For ongoing improvement and sustainability, the principal and trustees should continue to strengthen:

  • the teaching of Te Reo Māori to align with government policy about Māori language revitalisation

  • assessment practices with a focus on defining and monitoring accelerated progress

  • leadership with a focus on building relational trust and effective collaboration at every level of the school’s community

  • board capability through an ongoing and regular programme of training targeted to trustees’ needs.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The school has improved its capacity to sustain, improve and review its performance. The principal and board have worked collaboratively to address the areas identified in the previous report. There has been a deliberate focus on the development of coherent systems, processes and practices to raise achievement and improve wellbeing outcomes for students.

Through the charter, a framework has been developed to evaluate the progress of strategic priorities. The principal and board should continue to use this to determine the impact and effectiveness of programmes and initiatives on outcomes for students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Children’s Act 2014.

Conclusion

Very good progress has occurred since the 2016 ERO report. Development and improvement of school conditions that promote positive outcomes for students are evident. The curriculum and teaching practices reflect a Māori world view. A positive shift in student achievement is evident. Continuing to strengthen school leadership and governance capability should support ongoing improvement and sustainability.

On the basis of the findings of this review, ERO ‘s overall evaluation judgement of Waimārama School performance in achieving valued outcomes for its students is: Developing.

ERO’s Framework: Overall Findings and Judgement Tool derived from School Evaluation Indicators: Effective Practice for Improvement and Learner Success is available on ERO’s website.

Darcy Te Hau

(Acting)Director Review and Improvement Services (Central)

Central Region - Te Tai Pūtahi Nui

24 June 2020

About the school

The Education Counts website provides further information about the school’s student population, student engagement and student achievement.

1 Context

Waimarama School is a contributing primary school located on the fringe of Waimarama Beach. It caters for students from Years 1 to 6. Of the 22 students attending the school 15 identify as Māori. The school is situated beside Taupunga marae, which has linked with the school to provide learning opportunities in te reo me ngā tikanga Māori.

At the time of the review the school had a new teaching team including a principal, junior teacher and principal release teacher, who commenced their roles at the beginning of 2015. The principal is on study leave from the end of February to November 2016.

Findings of the 2013 ERO review have yet to be sufficiently addressed and are further outlined in this report.

2 Equity and excellence

The vision and valued outcomes defined by the school for all children are to 'be the best you can be', supported by Respect, Excel, Ask, Challenge and Happy (REACH). These were reviewed by the new teaching team in 2015. It is timely to revisit the school's vision and values in consultation with students, whānau and the community to better reflect current needs and aspirations.

The school's National Standards achievement information shows that over the last three years Māori student achievement in reading, writing and mathematics is similar to or higher than the achievement of all learners. However, achievement in all areas has declined since 2013. Teachers believe this is a result of improved data gathering and better informed judgements.

The school has yet to adequately address the areas of development identified in ERO's 2013 report. These included curriculum and assessment, reporting student achievement information to trustees and strengthening the performance management process.

Teachers understand the importance of regular attendance for raising student achievement. However, there is a need to strengthen the deliberate actions taken to accelerate the learning and achievement of students.

3 Accelerating achievement

How effectively does this school respond to children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

A school-valued outcome is for all their learners to achieve at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. This is not reflected in the school's achievement targets, which are not appropriately focused on accelerating student progress. There is no specific targeting of Māori and other students whose learning is most at risk.

Teachers are developing better systems to make reliable judgements about student achievement. There is a need to further improve assessment practices and use of achievement information to support student learning. This should include:

  • improving the identification of students needing extra support to accelerate their learning
  • developing effective teaching strategies to address specific, identified needs
  • improving the tracking and monitoring of student progress
  • establishing and implementing processes to ensure the reliability of teachers' judgements about achievement.

The school needs to develop a deliberate approach to effectively respond to children whose learning and achievement requires acceleration.

4 School conditions

How effectively do the school’s curriculum and other organisational processes and practices develop and enact the school’s vision, values, goals and priorities for equity and excellence?

The new curriculum introduced in 2015 provides some guidance for teaching, learning and assessment. Students participate in a wide range of learning experiences at the local marae.

The school is yet to fully implement The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC). Guiding information relating to reading, writing and mathematics has been developed. However, there is much more work needed to make sure the full breadth of the curriculum is accessed by students. Community consultation is required to ensure local aspirations are catered for within the school curriculum.

The school needs to develop a more useful document to guide teaching and learning. It should include:

  • the NZC vision, values, key competencies and principles
  • guidelines for the teaching of all learning areas
  • reflection of te ao Māori
  • integration of authentic and meaningful learning experiences.

Teachers are receiving external support to develop their understanding of the impact of their teaching on student engagement, progress and achievement. This process of inquiry is at very early stages of implementation and is not yet targeting those learners most at risk of not achieving.

Appraisal processes do not support teacher development and are not focused on ongoing improvement. Key next steps are to ensure:

  • appropriate goals are set
  • feedback is given, identifying strengths and areas to improve
  • sufficient evidence is collected in relation to Practising Teacher Criteria (PTC)
  • a formal mentoring programme is implemented to support provisionally registered teachers.

A new board of trustees is in place since EROs previous review. Members understand the importance of, and are committed to, their role. They need to further develop their knowledge and understanding of stewardship.

The principal needs to strengthen the reporting of student achievement to the board. This information should assist ongoing review of progress towards targets and build the school's evaluative capacity to inquire into the effectiveness of initiatives and programmes.

5 Going forward

How well placed is the school to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children?

Leaders and teachers:

  • have not yet adequately built their knowledge of the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated
  • have not yet adequately established necessary conditions to effectively accelerate learning and achievement
  • are not well placed to achieve and sustain equitable and excellent outcomes for all children.

ERO intends to carry out a process of ongoing evaluation to support development over the course of one-to-two years.

6 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and Self Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • Board administration.

  • Curriculum.

  • Management of health, safety and welfare.

  • Personnel management.

  • Asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • Emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment).

  • Physical safety of students.

  • Teacher registration.

  • Processes for appointing staff.

  • Stand down, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions.

  • Attendance.

  • Compliance with the provisions of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

During the course of ERO’s external evaluation, the following area of non-compliance was identified:

  • the school board, with the principal and teaching staff must report in writing to students enrolled in Years 1 to 8 and their parents on the students’ progress and achievement in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. [National Administration Guidelines 2A (a)]

In order to improve current practices the board of trustees should ensure:

  • teachers' appraisal is robust in supporting teacher improvement and gathering sufficient evidence for all PTCs
  • teaching and learning programmes reflect the NZC.

7 Recommendations

ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education consider providing support for the board in order to bring about improvements in the following areas:

  • evaluation, inquiry and knowledge building
  • professional leadership
  • curriculum development
  • use of student achievement data
  • understanding of the stewardship role.

Joyce Gebbie

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central

10 May 2016

About the school

Location

Waimarama Beach

Ministry of Education profile number

2718

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

22

Gender composition

Female 11, Male 11

Ethnic composition

Māori
Pākehā

15
7

Review team on site

February 2016

Date of this report

10 May 2016

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2013

August 2010

May 2007